CollectionsRocky Iv
IN THE NEWS

Rocky Iv

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1989 | By Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
"Back To The Future Part II," the long-awaited sequel to Michael J. Fox's first time travel tale, revved up in the holiday movie pole position last week, and there's no telling how many box office records it will leave in the dust before it runs out of gas. The film opened last Wednesday to $7 million, in what Universal Pictures called the biggest ever Wednesday box-office gross. By Sunday, it had had the biggest non-summer weekend ever, gobbling up nearly $40 million at the box office during the Thanksgiving weekend.
NEWS
August 15, 2014
NORMALLY WE journalists like to conduct no-holds-barred interviews, but exceptions can be made. Here's one: "Expendables 3" star Ronda Rousey, the popular MMA champion known for bending human limbs until joints separate. Ms. Rousey is free to take the conversation in any direction she wishes, and on this day she wishes to talk about her debt to "Expendables" writer/star/producer Sylvester Stallone, who fought to find room for her when bigger Hollywood names wanted the job. "There were much more high-profile women, better known names than me, and he was the one pushing for me and taking the risk," Rousey said.
NEWS
January 15, 1990 | By Joe Logan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Six weeks of filming gets under way here today on the much-awaited, much- ballyhooed Rocky V, purported to be the concluding chapter for Philadelphia's most famous export in years, fighter Rocky Balboa. But despite the hubbub about the movie and star Sylvester Stallone, a hush has fallen over the production company and city officials about the film's plot, the locations where they'll be filming and a host of other tidbits of trivia that would be fun for area residents to know. Here's what's known, or thought to be known, for the moment: THE PLOT.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1990 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
I love the character too much to do a "Rocky IV" and have people go away disappointed and say we bled it dry. So this is it. - Sylvester Stallone, discussing Rocky III on Feb. 17, 1983. Rocky V concludes with Rocky Balboa scaling the Philadelphia Museum of Art steps for what is devoutly promised to be the last time - but as the above disclaimer indicates, take that with a grain of smelling salts. The climb leaves the Italian Stallion badly winded, but he musters the strength for a Sly aside.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1986 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer (Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, United Press International, Reuters, the New York Daily News, the Washington Post and the New York Times.)
Luther Vandross was charged yesterday in Los Angeles with misdemeanor vehicular manslaughter and reckless driving in a Jan. 12 three-car accident that resulted in the death of a passenger in the soul singer's 1985 Mercedes- Benz. A prosecutor said the charges were filed against Vandross because he had been doing 50 in a 35-m.p.h. zone when he drifted across the center line of a winding road. "We intend to vigorously defend against these charges," said Vandross' attorney, Anthony Glassman.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1996 | By Sherry Karasik, FOR THE INQUIRER
Dolph Lundgren is on an olympian crusade that is taking him, appropriately, to the Olympics. The karate-star-turned-action-film hero is headed for Atlanta with the U.S. modern pentathlon team. He arrives not as a participant - at 37 years old, that would be a feat even for Lundgren - but as high-profile team leader and all-around booster for the arcane five-event sport. As the U.S. team prepares for Tuesday's events - shooting, fencing, swimming, equestrian riding and cross-country running - Lundgren will be backstage, coordinating such things as food, transportation and equipment, while using his international celebrity to help save the modern pentathlon from permanent exile in future games.
LIVING
October 5, 1986 | By Richard Zacks, Special to The Inquirer
Contrary to popular belief, the Rocky movies contain almost no boxing. Sure, Sylvester Stallone puts on Tufwear boxing gloves and wears baggy satin trunks, but when he starts swinging his fists, that's where the resemblance to the real thing ends. "It's so exaggerated it's ridiculous," said a real Rocky, Rocky Graziano, during a recent telephone conversation. Graziano reigned as middleweight boxing champ from 1947 to 1948. "People don't fight like that, people don't slug each other for 20 straight minutes," he added.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 1986 | By Christopher Cornell, Special to the Inquirer
NBC is offering a triple threat to sanity tonight, with three of producer Stephen J. Cannell's silliest shows running one after another. And if that's not enough, there's always the 12th Annual People's Choice Awards. EVENING HIGHLIGHTS NOVA: RETURN OF THE OSPREY (7:45 p.m., Ch. 12) - For centuries, one sign of spring in the Northeast was the return of the osprey to its nesting grounds along the coast between New York and Boston. But in the mid-1950s, this magnificent bird of prey began to disappear mysteriously.
NEWS
March 8, 1993 | by Bob Strauss, Los Angeles Daily News
What could be worse than a sequel to "Best of the Best," arguably the dumbest entry ever in the martial arts movie genre? Well, surprise. "Best of the Best 2" is not second "Best. " It's got superior production values, better acting, a more interesting story and Wayne Newton. Starring the original karate competition team of Eric Roberts, Phillip Rhee and (briefly) Christopher Penn, "Best 2" is as different from "Best 1" as, well, "Rocky IV" was from "Rocky. " "Best 2" unfolds in Las Vegas and the surrounding desert.
BUSINESS
May 2, 1991 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
Al Hornstein had a simple request concerning who would be allowed to wear Maaco caps on-screen in George Romero's remake of Night of the Living Dead, filmed outside Pittsburgh. "I said, 'No zombies,' " said Hornstein, who is public relations director for the King of Prussia auto-painting and bodywork chain. For Maaco to be plugged in three scenes - plus receiving an acknowledgment in the closing credits - Hornstein paid $300 toward the cost of paint supplied by a local Maaco franchisee and used on cars in the film.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2015 | By Molly Eichel
HE'S HERE! Rocky himself, Sylvester Stallone , was spotted in town this weekend, especially in the Midtown Village area, where I got reports of Sly shopping at I. Goldberg (1300 Chestnut St.) and strolling down 13th Street with a pal. I'm sure he'll catch a bite or two with buddy Harry Jay Katz while here, as well. Stallone, of course, is in town to start shooting "Creed," the "Rocky" sequel starring Michael B. Jordan ("Friday Night Lights," "Fruitvale Station") as Adonis Creed, the grandson of the Italian Stallion's rival-turned-bestie, Apollo Creed (played by Carl Weathers in the original "Rocky," who was, alas, killed by Communism in the form of Dolph Lundgren 's Ivan Drago, in 1985's "Rocky IV")
NEWS
August 15, 2014
NORMALLY WE journalists like to conduct no-holds-barred interviews, but exceptions can be made. Here's one: "Expendables 3" star Ronda Rousey, the popular MMA champion known for bending human limbs until joints separate. Ms. Rousey is free to take the conversation in any direction she wishes, and on this day she wishes to talk about her debt to "Expendables" writer/star/producer Sylvester Stallone, who fought to find room for her when bigger Hollywood names wanted the job. "There were much more high-profile women, better known names than me, and he was the one pushing for me and taking the risk," Rousey said.
SPORTS
December 20, 2010 | by Frank Seravalli
Down the long corridor that extends from Peter Laviolette's office at the Flyers Skate Zone, past the Flyers dressing room and by the training rooms, there is often a curtain that gets closed to prevent the wandering eyes of reporters. Somewhere, out of sight, Sergei Bobrovsky is being re-tooled. You can almost imagine one of the training scenes with Ivan Drago in "Rocky IV" and picture Bobrovsky in his place. But instead of training with Sergei Igor Rimsky, Drago's trainer in the movie, Bobrovsky has been working daily with Flyers goaltending coach Jeff Reese.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2006 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Rocky Balboa, chewing his words like chunks of scrapple, is in reflective mode early in the sixth and promised final chapter of the Philadelphia pugilist's saga. The old Italian Stallion, long out to pasture, tells his pal Paulie, "I think there's still some stuff in the basement. " And he's not talking about plastic recyclables. Rocky Balboa, which Sylvester Stallone wrote, directs and stars in, comes 30 years and a few months after the Academy Award-winning best picture that made icons of both Stallone and his fictive Philly prizefighter.
NEWS
December 20, 2006 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Rocky Balboa, chewing his words like chunks of scrapple, is in reflective mode early in the sixth and promised final chapter of the Philadelphia pugilist's saga. The old Italian Stallion, long out to pasture, tells his pal Paulie, "I think there's still some stuff in the basement. " And he's not talking about plastic recyclables. Rocky Balboa, which Sylvester Stallone wrote, directs and stars in, comes 30 years and a few months after the Academy Award-winning best picture that made icons of both Stallone and his fictive Philly prizefighter.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2006 | By Don Steinberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Balboanian scholars may debate how much Rocky Balboa adds to the Rocky oeuvre. But there's no mystery why Sylvester Stallone has made six films about boxing, and just one about disco dancing. Dramatically, boxing has it all: One man (or woman) with nothing left to lose, confronting personal demons, forced to battle the pain one last time for family, loyalty and redemption, with the chance to go from rags to riches (and then maybe back). And that's besides the bloody action scenes.
NEWS
February 11, 2006 | By Michael Vitez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of Philadelphians came to the Rocky Steps at the Philadelphia Museum of Art yesterday hoping for maybe five seconds of fame. Sal Cavaliere, 23, of Upper Darby, ran the steps in his T-shirt with Rocky and the American flag on the front. "I've been trying to get in this movie," he said. "We went down to the set like eight times. This is my last chance. I love Rocky. He represents all of us. He followed his dream. " Sylvester Stallone decided that as the final credits roll in his sixth Rocky movie, Rocky Balboa, he should show real Philadelphians - as many as 100, in rapid-fire fashion - dancing and punching thin air at the top of the museum steps.
NEWS
June 14, 2002 | By Chris Gray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Surgery, homemade chicken soup with stars, and the presence of her favorite stuffed animal Barrett the Parrot couldn't save Muffin the miniature schnauzer. Early Monday morning, four days after a vicious attack by her notorious Wynnewood neighbor, Rocky the German shepherd, Muffin died at the University of Pennsylvania veterinary hospital. But she did not die in vain. Citing police reports from four other victims, Muffin's owner, Janis Peterson, persuaded the Montgomery County courts to step in against Rocky, an 80-pound beast with a rap sheet that would make a pit bull blush.
SPORTS
May 17, 2000 | by Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
With four siblings in college or out on their own, Tom Gorman knows how to fill the empty bedrooms in his Gwynedd Valley home for roughly a week. With cheerleaders! Ah, he'll settle for athletes. Gorman, a wideout-defensive back, is a senior-to-be at La Salle High and an important member of the football team. Next September, he will participate in what promises to be a wonderful mix of sports and cultural exchange. The Russians are coming. The Russians are coming.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1996 | By Sherry Karasik, FOR THE INQUIRER
Dolph Lundgren is on an olympian crusade that is taking him, appropriately, to the Olympics. The karate-star-turned-action-film hero is headed for Atlanta with the U.S. modern pentathlon team. He arrives not as a participant - at 37 years old, that would be a feat even for Lundgren - but as high-profile team leader and all-around booster for the arcane five-event sport. As the U.S. team prepares for Tuesday's events - shooting, fencing, swimming, equestrian riding and cross-country running - Lundgren will be backstage, coordinating such things as food, transportation and equipment, while using his international celebrity to help save the modern pentathlon from permanent exile in future games.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|