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Rod Carew

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April 1, 1986 | By BILL FLEISCHMAN, Daily News Sports Writer Compiled from staff and wire reports
There is an unemployed baseball player with more than 3,000 career hits sitting at home in Anaheim Hills, Calif. Rod Carew, the seven-time American League batting champion, has been waiting for a call from some team that could use his services. The 40-year-old Carew, the California Angels' leading hitter four of the past six years, was not offered a new contract for 1986. Carew, a certain future Hall of Famer who has 3,053 career hits and a lifetime batting average of .328, wants to play one more season.
SPORTS
May 4, 2008
The Angels' Vladimir Guerrero, who used to torment the Phillies back when there was still a baseball team in Montreal, reached the 2,000-hit plateau last week. He did it in 6,171 at-bats, the fourth-fewest by players who entered the majors in 1950 or later. The top three: Wade Boggs 5,832; Rod Carew 5,965; Tony Gwynn 6,094. Boggs, Carew and Gwynn combined for 20 batting titles. Guerrero has never won one, but he has hit at least .300 in each of his 11 full seasons. Carew (13 times)
SPORTS
June 3, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Seven-time American League batting champion Rod Carew, who wasn't offered a 1986 contract by the California Angels and then was snubbed by the 25 other major-league teams, announced his retirement yesterday. Carew, 40, thus completed a 19-year big-league career with a .328 lifetime batting average and 3,053 hits, the 13th-highest total in baseball history. Recently, Carew said, he was offered a contract for 1986 by the San Francisco Giants but decided against accepting the offer.
SPORTS
July 22, 1991 | by Jennifer Frey, Daily News Sports Writer
They came by airplane from Gatun, Panama, Rod Carew's birthplace. Their carry-on luggage was simple - a purse, a camera and a white plastic bag filled with hand-sized Panamanian flags. Carlo and Trina Nunez, two fans who made the journey from Panama, were at the entrance to the Hall of Fame grounds early yesterday, handing out the flags to anyone who could say, "Rod Carew is the greatest" in Spanish. Or at least something close. "He is our hero, our whole country's hero," Carlo said in broken English.
SPORTS
April 29, 1996 | Daily News Wire Services
Rod Carew and his wife were nearly kicked off a plane on the way back from their daughter's funeral in a dispute with a flight attendant, the Hall of Famer said. The flight attendant roughly handled a portrait of 18-year-old Michelle Carew, her father said Saturday. The portrait "is my heart, the daughter I'm not ever going to see again, that I'm going to cry over for years to come," the California Angels' batting coach told the Orange County Register. Michelle Carew died April 17 after a seven-month battle with leukemia.
SPORTS
August 19, 1986 | By Ray Parrillo, Inquirer Staff Writer
The next time your favorite baseball team tells one of its future Hall of Famers to take a hike when the guy looks as if he still has something left, don't rush out to cancel your order for season tickets. The next time the disabled list grabs the guy who has made a splendid habit of carrying your favorite team on his back for about a month each year, don't sit in your car in the garage with the motor running. Hang in there during such adversities. Keep the faith. There might be a savior from some remote minor-league outpost such as Edmonton or Rochester to pick up the slack for your fallen hero.
SPORTS
July 4, 1993 | By Jayson Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stan Musial couldn't do it. Pete Rose couldn't do it. Rod Carew couldn't do it. George Brett couldn't do it. Wade Boggs couldn't do it. Tony Gwynn couldn't do it. For 52 years now, baseball's foremost woodworkers have been taking their best shot at hitting's ultimate magic number - .400. And for 52 years now, they have been finding out exactly how remarkable Ted Williams' fabled .406 batting average in 1941 really was. But just when you thought there was a better chance of somebody putting a baseball into orbit than of someone hitting .400 again, along came John Olerud and Andres Galarraga.
SPORTS
January 9, 1991 | By Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
Once upon a time, the Phillies signed a tall, skinny, black hockey player out of Canada. The year was 1962. The 18-year-old also had done some pitching, and the Phillies kind of liked his arm. Last night, Ferguson Arthur Jenkins joined Rod Carew and Gaylord Perry as the newest members of the Baseball Hall of Fame. Failing to make the cut were another former Phillie, Jim Bunning, and Rollie Fingers, the all-time leader in saves. Sadly for fans at long-gone Connie Mack Stadium, typical of the dusty days that typified the Phillies franchise during that thirsty time, Jenkins accomplished almost none of what launched him to immortality while wearing those cherry red pinstripes.
SPORTS
June 3, 1986 | By KEVIN MULLIGAN, Daily News Sports Writer Compiled from staff and wire reports
Rod Carew was not interested in playing for the San Francisco Giants, the only team to express an interest in him this season. So yesterday, citing his discovery of a life outside baseball, the game's most consistent hitter over the last two decades officially called it quits. "Had they (Giants) called me in the spring, when my mind was programmed for baseball, I am sure I would have signed," said the 40-year-old Carew, a seven-time American League batting champion. "But I'm having a lot of fun now, for the first time in years.
SPORTS
May 31, 1986 | Daily News Wire Services
Charlie Bolling, of Rosemont, shot a 70 yesterday to move 7-under par and take a one-stroke lead after the second round of the $500,000 Kemper Open at Bethesda, Md. Bolling, who never has finished higher than ninth in a PGA tournament, registered five birdies, including three on the final four holes. "I feel good about my position, but heck, we're only halfway through," Bolling said. "I've learned that you can't start thinking about winning until the last day. " Ayako Okamoto added a 2-under-par 70 to a first-round 66 to take a three- stroke lead in the LPGA Championship at Mason, Ohio.
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SPORTS
May 21, 2011 | Daily News Wire Services
Harmon Killebrew's Hall of Fame career as one of the most powerful sluggers baseball has known was merely a subplot to his story as family and friends gathered to say goodbye. What they recalled most was Killebrew the gentle, caring man who treated all those he encountered with respect. Several hundred mourners, including past and current members of the Minnesota Twins, attended Killebrew's funeral service yesterday at a church in Peoria, Ariz., north of Phoenix. Killebrew, who hit 573 home runs in his long major league career, died Tuesday at his home in Scottsdale, Ariz., of esophageal cancer at 74. The Twins were able to attend, because the ballclub was in Arizona for a weekend interleague series with the Arizona Diamondbacks.
SPORTS
May 4, 2008
The Angels' Vladimir Guerrero, who used to torment the Phillies back when there was still a baseball team in Montreal, reached the 2,000-hit plateau last week. He did it in 6,171 at-bats, the fourth-fewest by players who entered the majors in 1950 or later. The top three: Wade Boggs 5,832; Rod Carew 5,965; Tony Gwynn 6,094. Boggs, Carew and Gwynn combined for 20 batting titles. Guerrero has never won one, but he has hit at least .300 in each of his 11 full seasons. Carew (13 times)
SPORTS
April 29, 1996 | Daily News Wire Services
Rod Carew and his wife were nearly kicked off a plane on the way back from their daughter's funeral in a dispute with a flight attendant, the Hall of Famer said. The flight attendant roughly handled a portrait of 18-year-old Michelle Carew, her father said Saturday. The portrait "is my heart, the daughter I'm not ever going to see again, that I'm going to cry over for years to come," the California Angels' batting coach told the Orange County Register. Michelle Carew died April 17 after a seven-month battle with leukemia.
SPORTS
April 9, 1996 | Daily News Wire Services
The 18-year-old daughter of Hall of Famer Rod Carew remained in critical condition at Children's Hospital in Orange, Calif., yesterday, breathing through a respirator and on dialysis, a hospital spokesman said. Carew, the California Angels' hitting instructor, took an indefinite leave of absence last week to spend more time with his daughter, Michelle, who has been suffering from a potentially fatal form of leukemia for seven months. Carew has parked his motor home near the hospital so the family can monitor Michelle's condition around the clock.
SPORTS
July 4, 1993 | By Jayson Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Stan Musial couldn't do it. Pete Rose couldn't do it. Rod Carew couldn't do it. George Brett couldn't do it. Wade Boggs couldn't do it. Tony Gwynn couldn't do it. For 52 years now, baseball's foremost woodworkers have been taking their best shot at hitting's ultimate magic number - .400. And for 52 years now, they have been finding out exactly how remarkable Ted Williams' fabled .406 batting average in 1941 really was. But just when you thought there was a better chance of somebody putting a baseball into orbit than of someone hitting .400 again, along came John Olerud and Andres Galarraga.
SPORTS
November 10, 1991 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
If he teaches as well as he hit, Rod Carew could make the California Angels the next team to follow the last-to-first routine. Carew, a seven-time American League battting champion who finished with a .328 career average, last week was named the Angels' hitting instructor. Former Phillie Deron Johnson, the Angels' hitting instructor last year, was appointed the team's dugout coach. "I was a thinking hitter," Carew said. "Hopefully, I can get them thinking more at the plate.
SPORTS
July 22, 1991 | By Frank Dolson, Inquirer Sports Editor
This was the best baseball has to offer. This was Ted Williams enthusiastically applauding Joe DiMaggio and steadying a chair for him as Williams' most cherished rival from a treasured era sat down next to him, not far from Willie Mays. It was 31 returning Hall of Famers turning out on a brutally hot weekend to pay tribute to the Hall's Class of '91 - Rod Carew, Ferguson Jenkins, Gaylord Perry and the late Tony Lazzeri and Bill Veeck. It was Robin Roberts walking over to Willie McCovey, who broke into the big leagues by going 4 for 4 against him, and playfully hitting the big guy with a rolled-up program to the delight of the spectators.
SPORTS
July 22, 1991 | by Jennifer Frey, Daily News Sports Writer
They came by airplane from Gatun, Panama, Rod Carew's birthplace. Their carry-on luggage was simple - a purse, a camera and a white plastic bag filled with hand-sized Panamanian flags. Carlo and Trina Nunez, two fans who made the journey from Panama, were at the entrance to the Hall of Fame grounds early yesterday, handing out the flags to anyone who could say, "Rod Carew is the greatest" in Spanish. Or at least something close. "He is our hero, our whole country's hero," Carlo said in broken English.
SPORTS
January 9, 1991 | By Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
Once upon a time, the Phillies signed a tall, skinny, black hockey player out of Canada. The year was 1962. The 18-year-old also had done some pitching, and the Phillies kind of liked his arm. Last night, Ferguson Arthur Jenkins joined Rod Carew and Gaylord Perry as the newest members of the Baseball Hall of Fame. Failing to make the cut were another former Phillie, Jim Bunning, and Rollie Fingers, the all-time leader in saves. Sadly for fans at long-gone Connie Mack Stadium, typical of the dusty days that typified the Phillies franchise during that thirsty time, Jenkins accomplished almost none of what launched him to immortality while wearing those cherry red pinstripes.
SPORTS
January 6, 1991 | By Jayson Stark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Another Hall of Fame vote will be announced Tuesday. And this is one of those years to pay close attention, because this will be an exceptionally interesting election. Here are some of the intriguing names on this year's ballot: Jim Bunning. This is Bunning's 15th and final year of eligibility. And since his vote totals have gone from 311 to 283 to 257 the last three years, it doesn't look as if he's building momentum. But if, as expected, he doesn't make it, his exclusion will be more than simply unjust.
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