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Rodale Institute

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NEWS
September 7, 2000 | By Nicole Barnes, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The little hands moved more rapidly than a harvester as they picked cucumbers and green beans from a bountiful garden yesterday morning. But these vegetables didn't come from just any garden - they came from the prize-winning garden at Kings Highway Elementary School. For placing first in the organic-gardening competition at the elementary level, the school will receive $400 for garden supplies tonight at the Rodale Institute's annual benefit dinner. The Kutztown, Pa., institute is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the regeneration of agriculture through education, research and training.
LIVING
April 14, 2006 | By Therese Ciesinski FOR THE INQUIRER
If I tried to sell you a garden product that holds water in the soil yet allows it to drain, fertilizes plants, suppresses weeds, and loosens compacted soil, and I promised I could back up those claims with research, would you whip out your checkbook or report me to the Federal Trade Commission? Well, scientists are demonstrating that compost - the dark, earthy stuff that results when wet and dry vegetative materials "cook" into a whole greater than the sum of their parts - solves a multitude of horticultural problems, while also saving time, money, and effort.
NEWS
November 14, 1995 | By Lola Smallwood, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The crisp, early-morning wind slices through the trees that border the Seven Stars Farm, fanning dozens of fragile leaves to the ground in a colorful blizzard of scarlet and rust. While some look at fallen leaves as a cumbersome nuisance, farm manager David Griffith sees the death of a leaf as a source of life on this dairy farm between Phoenixville and French Creek. For the last two years, the biodynamic dairy farm has used the loads of leaves collected by the Phoenixville Public Works Department each fall to make compost that fertilizes the topsoil year-round.
NEWS
September 21, 1990 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this article
Robert Rodale, the "Mr. Natural" of the publishing world whose Lehigh County-based Rodale Press achieved bottom-line success while promoting exercise, self-healing and chemical-free nutrition, died yesterday in a car accident in Moscow. He was 60. Mr. Rodale, chairman of the board and chief executive officer of the company that publishes the magazines Prevention, Organic Gardening, Backpacker and Runner's World, was in the Soviet Union to set up a Russian-language edition of one of his publications, The New Farmer.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2003 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The organic-food movement is getting organized. Local grocery stores have organic-food aisles, and menus in restaurants all over the Philadelphia region include chemical-free salad greens. But fledgling organic farmers such as Gloucester County's Bob Muth have been unsure about how to set prices for their produce. "Growers who are new tend to underprice their stuff," Muth said. "Farmers operating in the dark tend to make bad decisions. " In response to queries from farmers such as Muth, the Rodale Institute in Kutztown, Pa., launched the agriculture world's first organic price index yesterday.
NEWS
November 23, 2000 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania Agriculture Secretary Samuel E. Hayes Jr. has announced $860,000 in matching grants from his department to 22 nonprofit trade groups, to help promote the state's farm products. The program funded $726,000 worth of such promotional proposals last year. "We started in 1995 with about $250,000 [and] 15 proposals," Deputy Secretary of Agriculture Russell C. Redding said in a telephone interview. "The purpose is to leverage private promotional advertising dollars that commodity interests raise from their constituencies.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2006 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Covered Bridge Produce, a Berks County farm that supplied vegetables to 600 families in the Philadelphia region, has suspended operations, saying it ran out of money. Several customers said they knew Covered Bridge was having a tough year, but were surprised by yesterday's announcement and said they felt more sad than angry. "I don't really feel like I've really lost a whole lot in this, because it's been fabulous produce," Bala Cynwyd resident Lisa Nicholson said. As a subscription farm, Covered Bridge had collected $675 each from customers in the spring for a full share of 23 weekly produce deliveries.
NEWS
December 20, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ardath Harter Rodale, 81, of Allentown, former chairwoman of Rodale Inc., died Friday at her home. In 1942, Mrs. Rodale's father-in-law, J.I. Rodale, started Organic Farming and Gardening magazine, and in 1951 the company introduced Prevention. After he died in 1971, his son, Bob, succeeded him, and expanded the company into a publisher of books and magazines focused on health and fitness. In 1990, Bob Rodale died in an auto accident while on a trip to Russia. Before he left, one of his executives asked him what would happen to his publications without him. "You'll have to trust Ardie," he replied.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1998 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Whoa there! What's this happening at the New Jersey State Fair? Looks like name-brand entertainment this year, along with the familiar parade of amusement rides, carnival attractions and agricultural events that make the state fair a popular family outing. The fair began last night and goes through next weekend. The headliner tonight will be the Fabulous Thunderbirds, fronted by original member Kim Wilson. On Saturday night, it's sax player Clarence Clemons, the legendary sideman to Bruce Springsteen.
FOOD
September 3, 1997 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Support your local farmer. For Ann Cain in Mullica Hill, that means five families, now friends, helping to keep her 119-acre organic farm afloat by buying shares in the harvest from a one-acre truck garden. For a mix of cash and labor, members may harvest all the produce they need - strawberries, tomatoes, corn, eggplant, summer squash, green beans, lettuce, beets, cabbage, limas, onions, potatoes, sweet potatoes, zucchini, and more. "We're so small that we go on the honor system," said Cain, citing the group's philosophy: "There's enough in this world for everyone's need, but not for their greed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
With his burly physique and woolly beard, Brandon Barnhart looks every inch the laid-back country kid from tiny West College Corner, Ind. But don't be fooled. This guy is driven. After eight years in the Air Force working on nuclear cruise missiles, Barnhart returned to civilian life in 2010 and immediately reenrolled at Indiana University to finish his undergraduate degree in general studies and history. And while he grew up around conventionally grown sweet corn, soybeans, and hay on his family's farm, he intends to do things his way - as an organic farmer.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Be honest. What kind of gardener comes to mind when you hear the word "greenhouse"? Probably not guys like Ed Egolf, a truck driver in Shermans Dale, in rural Perry County, northwest of Harrisburg. But his zest for growing tomatoes and peppers from seed indoors rivals any you'll find in elite horticulture circles. "When you're in the greenhouse working on something, focusing on that, nothing else really matters," he says cheerily. Though a popular fantasy, greenhouses aren't for everyone.
NEWS
December 20, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ardath Harter Rodale, 81, of Allentown, former chairwoman of Rodale Inc., died Friday at her home. In 1942, Mrs. Rodale's father-in-law, J.I. Rodale, started Organic Farming and Gardening magazine, and in 1951 the company introduced Prevention. After he died in 1971, his son, Bob, succeeded him, and expanded the company into a publisher of books and magazines focused on health and fitness. In 1990, Bob Rodale died in an auto accident while on a trip to Russia. Before he left, one of his executives asked him what would happen to his publications without him. "You'll have to trust Ardie," he replied.
NEWS
May 3, 2009 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You've been making fun of Prince Charles for a long time now - the ears like open taxi doors, the fuddy-duddy mannerisms and marital missteps. But here's something you probably don't know about HRH Charles Philip Arthur George, Prince of Wales: For almost a quarter-century, he has been a prescient champion of organic gardening, a famous, if lonely, voice in a wilderness once considered the preserve of wackos and hippies. At long last, the gardener formally known as Prince is alone no more.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2006 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Covered Bridge Produce, a Berks County farm that supplied vegetables to 600 families in the Philadelphia region, has suspended operations, saying it ran out of money. Several customers said they knew Covered Bridge was having a tough year, but were surprised by yesterday's announcement and said they felt more sad than angry. "I don't really feel like I've really lost a whole lot in this, because it's been fabulous produce," Bala Cynwyd resident Lisa Nicholson said. As a subscription farm, Covered Bridge had collected $675 each from customers in the spring for a full share of 23 weekly produce deliveries.
LIVING
April 14, 2006 | By Therese Ciesinski FOR THE INQUIRER
If I tried to sell you a garden product that holds water in the soil yet allows it to drain, fertilizes plants, suppresses weeds, and loosens compacted soil, and I promised I could back up those claims with research, would you whip out your checkbook or report me to the Federal Trade Commission? Well, scientists are demonstrating that compost - the dark, earthy stuff that results when wet and dry vegetative materials "cook" into a whole greater than the sum of their parts - solves a multitude of horticultural problems, while also saving time, money, and effort.
NEWS
August 29, 2005 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Among the immaculate lawns in Cherry Hill, some still a vivid shade of emerald in late August, the Deppa family's yard is marred by traces of imperfection: A scattering of brown patches and - gasp! - some weeds. Sarah Deppa endures it willingly. She's gone chemical-free. "I just didn't want any pesticides whatsoever," said Deppa, who hands out flyers urging her neighbors to use fewer chemicals. "My feeling is, this stuff is all over the neighborhood. " Crabby about crabgrass?
BUSINESS
February 26, 2003 | By Kaitlin Gurney INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The organic-food movement is getting organized. Local grocery stores have organic-food aisles, and menus in restaurants all over the Philadelphia region include chemical-free salad greens. But fledgling organic farmers such as Gloucester County's Bob Muth have been unsure about how to set prices for their produce. "Growers who are new tend to underprice their stuff," Muth said. "Farmers operating in the dark tend to make bad decisions. " In response to queries from farmers such as Muth, the Rodale Institute in Kutztown, Pa., launched the agriculture world's first organic price index yesterday.
NEWS
November 23, 2000 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania Agriculture Secretary Samuel E. Hayes Jr. has announced $860,000 in matching grants from his department to 22 nonprofit trade groups, to help promote the state's farm products. The program funded $726,000 worth of such promotional proposals last year. "We started in 1995 with about $250,000 [and] 15 proposals," Deputy Secretary of Agriculture Russell C. Redding said in a telephone interview. "The purpose is to leverage private promotional advertising dollars that commodity interests raise from their constituencies.
NEWS
September 7, 2000 | By Nicole Barnes, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The little hands moved more rapidly than a harvester as they picked cucumbers and green beans from a bountiful garden yesterday morning. But these vegetables didn't come from just any garden - they came from the prize-winning garden at Kings Highway Elementary School. For placing first in the organic-gardening competition at the elementary level, the school will receive $400 for garden supplies tonight at the Rodale Institute's annual benefit dinner. The Kutztown, Pa., institute is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the regeneration of agriculture through education, research and training.
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