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Rodin Museum

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July 27, 2012 | By Mary SYDNOR and For the Daily News
AUGUST RODIN is generally considered the father of modern sculpture, though his works reference the classical sculpture of ancient Greece and Rome. That balance of old and new is reflected in the just-reopened Rodin Museum on the Parkway. As part of its summer concert series, the museum commissioned contemporary French composer Philippe Hurel to create three pieces, called "Spectral Impressions," that will be performed Saturday in the museum's sculpture garden by the Argento Chamber Ensemble.
NEWS
October 29, 1999 | By Elisa Ung, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Rodin Museum, which houses a collection by sculptor Auguste Rodin in its building on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, will close for eight months while central air-conditioning is installed, beginning Nov. 7. It is scheduled to reopen in July. The renovations will allow the museum to exhibit works on paper and other pieces that require stricter climate control, museum officials said. "It gives us more flexibility not only to exhibit the full breadth of our collection, but also to have the public enjoy it more during the summer months," said Gail Harrity, chief operating officer of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, which administers the Rodin Museum.
NEWS
August 17, 1990 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
A small fire that erupted yesterday morning inside the Rodin Museum was started by thieves who stole $200 from the museum souvenir shop's cash register, police said. Firefighters were summoned to the museum at 22d Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway at 6:37 a.m. after an employee detected smoke in the building, fire officials said. When firefighters arrived, they found that a fire in some clothing or other material in a storage area in the building's loft had been extinguished, apparently by the intruders, police said.
NEWS
December 16, 1989 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
The Rodin Museum on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway today begins a new lease on life. The museum, which houses the world's second largest collection of Auguste Rodin's sculpture, has been closed for more than six weeks for renovations. It reopens this morning showing more of that collection than ever before, in galleries that have been restored to their original sparkle. The face lift was long overdue; for too many years, the Rodin has suffered a kind of benign neglect because of its location and its foster-child relationship to the Philadelphia Museum of Art, which has administered it since 1939.
NEWS
May 12, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
An engineer who sued after he nearly died more than three years ago, when he fell 38 feet through a glass ceiling at the Rodin Museum, has reached a $7.25 million settlement with the defendants, including the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the museum's security company, lawyers for the man said Tuesday. The settlement was reached last week in Philadelphia Common Pleas Court before jury selection began, said lawyers Larry Bendesky, David Kwass, and David Langsam, who filed the suit on behalf of Phani Guthula.
NEWS
November 26, 2010 | By QUEEN MUSE, museq@phillynews.com 215-854-5880
Cement trucks, piles of soil, pipes and leafless shrubs are piled high behind construction gates and strategically placed signs that announce the new home of the Barnes Foundation on Benjamin Franklin Parkway at 21st Street. While the museum's move from Merion to Philadelphia has been highly publicized, fewer people know about a similar project taking place right next door, at the Rodin Museum. The Rodin Museum houses some of French sculptor Auguste Rodin's greatest works, and has been open on the Parkway since 1929.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2012 | Freelance
THE PHILADELPHIA Mausoleum of Contemporary Art and local film website celebrate all things David Lynch on Friday. The director of TV's "Twin Peaks" and films such as "Blue Velvet" spent time in Philly as a student at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Lynch lived in the PhilaMOCA neighborhood, which some refer to as "Eraserhood" in honor of the director's iconic film "Eraserhead. " "Eraserhood Forever" celebrates the mausoleum's new Lynch-themed mural by artist Evan Cairo with Lynch-inspired art and performances, including a reading of essays by Juliet Hope Wayne, an art show featuring more than 40 pieces by local and national artists, and musical performances by rockabilly band Full Blown Cherry and solo electronica band Void Vision.
NEWS
March 11, 1989 | By Dave Bittan and Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writers Staff writers Kurt Heine and Joe O'Dowd contributed to this report
The Rodin Museum will soon be getting back its famous stolen friend. Police last night found the undamaged bronze sculpture, "Mask of the Man with the Broken Nose," in the basement of a Center City apartment building wrapped in brown paper beneath a sewer line. The bust, by French sculptor Auguste Rodin, had been stolen from the museum last fall by a gunman who shot a hole in the museum wall, handcuffed together three guards and escaped with the sculpture worth $75,000. Stephen Shih, 24, a former trucker with an art student girlfriend, was charged last night in the theft.
NEWS
July 23, 2012 | Ed Sozanski
For the Philadelphia tourism industry, the consummation devoutly to be wished has arrived at last. The reopening of the Rodin Museum last weekend, its original character sensitively restored, completes the longed-for "museum mile" along the Parkway that tourism promoters hope will prove to be an irresistible magnet for the culturally motivated. The Rodin, the new museum of the Barnes Foundation next door, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art a few blocks west certainly create a destination worth a special journey, as the Michelin guides would put it. The question now is whether this new synergy will benefit all three museums, particularly the Rodin.
NEWS
July 16, 2012 | By Julie Zauzmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Since Philadelphia's Rodin Museum opened in 1929, one small room at the back of the gallery has seen many a fresh coat of paint. When the museum shut its doors for renovations a year and a half ago, conservators took a paint chip from the wall and drilled down to the first layer to discover the room's original hue: Pompeian red. Now, the room is a rich volcanic color once more. "The redness of the room really brings out the fierceness of the figures, which is what I like about Rodin - the edginess," said Mike Stanaitis, a resident of Washington, visiting the renovated museum on its second day of operation Saturday.
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NEWS
May 12, 2016 | By Julie Shaw, Staff Writer
An engineer who sued after he nearly died more than three years ago, when he fell 38 feet through a glass ceiling at the Rodin Museum, has reached a $7.25 million settlement with the defendants, including the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the museum's security company, lawyers for the man said Tuesday. The settlement was reached last week in Philadelphia Common Pleas Court before jury selection began, said lawyers Larry Bendesky, David Kwass, and David Langsam, who filed the suit on behalf of Phani Guthula.
TRAVEL
April 25, 2016
We're often asked how we pick our next destination. One way is through art. Perhaps there is an artist whose work you admire. Why not structure a trip to see his or her masterpieces on display? Planning a journey on that basis can lead to a lifelong global scavenger hunt, exploring places that are famous, and perhaps discovering a few more-obscure locales. We've long admired the powerful works of Auguste Rodin and are fortunate that we could start our quest in the world-class Rodin Museum on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in Philadelphia.
TRAVEL
September 14, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
PARIS - From 1886 to 1889, Vincent van Gogh painted more than 30 head-and-shoulders images of himself, making him one of the art world's most prolific self-portraitists. Lacking money to pay live models, or the reputation to win commissions from patrons, the introspective Dutchman gazed into a mirror and splashed his canvasses with selfies of his soul. The "Van Gogh selfie" has a whole new meaning now at the Musee d'Orsay, the 115-year-old former railway station on the Seine that opened in 1986 as a museum for impressionist and post-impressionist art and that received 3.4 million visitors in 2014.
NEWS
July 10, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the last 10 years, the Philadelphia Museum of Art has been systematically digitizing its entire collection of about 230,000 paintings, drawings, sculptures, furniture, artifacts, tapestries, rugs, personal artifacts - everything. Photographs, curatorial and conservation details, provenance, and analytical and art-historical minutiae have all been diligently recorded, entered into an increasingly vast database, and placed online. Other museums have also been putting their collections online, but Art Museum officials say they have moved forward with a thoroughness matched by few. Make no mistake, this is a slog.
NEWS
June 10, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Memorial services are set for 2 p.m. Tuesday, June 9, for Josephine Procopio Albarelli, 92, of Philadelphia, an educator and museum guide who died Saturday, May 2, of a heart ailment at her home. The services will be held at Dinan Funeral Home, 1923 Spring Garden St. Burial was private. A native of Fulton, N.Y., Mrs. Albarelli enrolled at Alfred (N.Y.) University when she was 15 and graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor of arts degree in 1942. Drawn by her love of the Spanish language, she moved to Mexico City, where she earned a master's degree from the National Autonomous University of Mexico.
NEWS
April 9, 2015 | Stephan Salisbury, The Inquirer
Gail Harrity, president and chief operating officer of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, will be honored with a lifetime achievement award by the Preservation Alliance of Greater Philadelphia, the alliance has announced. Carolyn Boyce, alliance executive director, said Tuesday that Harrity and the Art Museum have "diligently" cared for all of "the historically and architecturally significant buildings" in their care, citing renovation and refurbishing of the Perelman Building, the Rodin Museum, the main building, and the museum's two historic Fairmount Park mansions.
NEWS
February 27, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The South Asian galleries at the Philadelphia Museum of Art - the eight second-floor rooms containing such dramatic works as the mammoth Pillared Temple Hall built in the 16th century in southern India - will be closed for more than a year after Sunday. Museum officials said Wednesday that the closure, long in the planning, will allow a complete rethinking of how the South Asian collection is presented to the public. Galleries will be reconfigured, lighting and floors will be upgraded and refurbished, and the stories told through the artworks will be revised, expanded, and refocused.
NEWS
January 18, 2015
The "Sideshow" column Friday gave an incorrect name for Kris Jenner of Kardashian family fame. The "Changing Skyline" column Friday incorrectly identified the city agency that oversees the Benjamin Franklin Parkway and gave an approval for an 11-story apartment house behind the Rodin Museum. It is the Department of Parks and Recreation.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The first time that developer David Blumenfeld proposed an apartment house for the strip of land behind the Rodin Museum, he was practically laughed out of the Art Commission. His renderings showed a bland six-story building rising up like a wave behind the tiny classical temple, ready to swallow the Paul Cret masterpiece in its glassy maw. What a difference a few months can make. When Blumenfeld returned to the commission last week with a revised design for 2100 Hamilton by Barton Partners, he was somehow able to talk members into approving the concept.
NEWS
August 29, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
The fast-paced growth of Philadelphia's lower Spring Garden neighborhood quickened Wednesday, with the official groundbreaking of a massive, $160 million luxury apartment complex. The project promises to further transform an area that 20 years ago was a dead zone, and that 20 years from now may be unrecognizable. "It's overused in real estate," said Brady Nolan, one of the developers, "but every great project must have three things: location, location, and Whole Foods. " A big Whole Foods - twice the size of the current market nearby - will anchor the building, just off the Benjamin Franklin Parkway.
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