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NEWS
April 15, 2008 | By Jan Hefler INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ralph Knisell, 83, of Wenonah, a former outdoors writer who built custom fishing rods, died Friday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital after suffering a massive stroke. Mr. Knisell wrote columns on fishing and hunting for the Gloucester County Times and filed weekly for Fisherman magazine. He also broadcast reports every Saturday on WSNJ-AM (1240) in Bridgeton, N.J. "For the past 28 years or so, I don't think he ever missed a program unless he was in the hospital or something was wrong," said George Moore, host of the station's Sportsman's Hotline show.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2006 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Joe Shipley is psyched. Tuning up for his annual gearhead jamboree - Sunday's Rock-n-Rods, a show of eccentrically beautiful vintage cars - Shipley is not only hosting hundreds of cars and a thousand hot-rod enthusiasts. He's readying his own 1950 Buick Fastback for the show outside the Whiskey Dix Saloon. It's his car with the kitschy fake fur, fringe, and a tapestry of the "Poker Playing Dogs" on display. "It's beautiful," he says with pride of his Buick baby, just one of his treasured rods.
NEWS
May 31, 1996 | By Richard Jones, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mr. Ewerth's gym class trooped out of Pickett Middle School yesterday to the banks of the Wissahickon in Fairmount Park to take part in this new course you don't see much of in city schools these days. It's called fishin'. Seems you take these long pole-like things and you hold them over the water and catch edible creatures using something called a lure. Strange. Yet, 35 city kids, armed with rods donated by the state's Fish and Game Commission, the school district's blessing, and tankfuls of youthful confidence, went down Valley Green to figure out what this fishing stuff is all about anyway.
NEWS
July 23, 1995 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He's a big-smiling, mill-town boy hunting for a way to tell a Northerner in a white shirt how it feels when his 1966 Ford Galaxie rips down the drag strip with a jolt so hard his cheeks shimmy like Jell-O. He dips his head, looks around, and whispers in the same soft lup-lup-lup rhythm of a rebuilt 350 engine. "Now I'll tell you," says Chad Christy, who fixes looms in the Fieldcrest Cannon textile mill, "if someone said to me you could either have sex with Miss America or drive a race car, why, I'd choose the race car every time.
NEWS
November 9, 1993 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
CAT HOME AFTER 6 YEARS, HEADS STRAIGHT FOR FRIDGE It's hard to say whether Miszan the missing cat spent the last six years on an incredible journey, but there's no doubt about her memory. After a six-year absence, Miszan returned home and walked in as if she had never been away - setting out to raid the refrigerator before settling into her favorite resting place on a dining-room chair. Greta Vindberg-Nielsen had been preparing to go out to buy some ice cream in Stockholm when the door handle jiggled.
NEWS
May 11, 1990 | By Donna Cassata, Associated Press Inquirer staff writer Tom Belden contributed to this article
The Army has failed to overcome persistent safety problems with an advanced transport helicopter, congressional investigators said yesterday. Two accidents involving the aircraft have resulted in the deaths of 15 soldiers. "There is simply no justification for putting our soldiers at avoidable risk because of mechanically deficient aircraft," Rep. John D. Dingell (D., Mich.) said about flaws in the CH-47D Chinook helicopter. The Army has about 300 of the aircraft, produced by Boeing Helicopters in Ridley Township, Delaware County, and Avco-Lycoming of Stratford, Conn.
NEWS
June 9, 2002 | By E. Philip Krider
Each year, about 20,000 cloud-to-ground lightning strikes happen within the 40-by-40-square-mile area centered on Independence Hall. On average, Philadelphia receives about 12.5 strikes per square mile per year. Each person in a region like this runs a 50-50 chance that lightning will strike within 210 meters (690 feet) of him or her each year. Such strikes will be frightening, of course, and a fraction (about 1 percent) will produce injuries or significant property damage. Grounded "Franklin rods" will protect against lightning - and will also provide considerable peace of mind.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1998 | By Michael D. Towle, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Wondering how to make holiday gift-buying seem less like a search-and-rescue mission? The Pentagon may be able to provide the answer. The billions of dollars President Ronald Reagan pumped into the Pentagon budget during the 1980s not only produced an awesome war machine, but spun off some cool grown-up toys. High-tech devices developed by the military have become hot retail items for outdoor enthusiasts and weekend athletes. On the list: golf clubs using aerospace-grade titanium; compasses that use satellite technology; and Navy-developed sonar systems that tell fishermen exactly where to place their hooks.
NEWS
March 21, 2011
Let's step back, take a deep breath, and disregard all the gloom and doom concerning nuclear power and earthquakes. Let's look at the facts. Japan has four nuclear plants on its east coast, and we have some in California, near or on earthquake fault lines - and all of them have been designed to withstand an earthquake with a Richter rating ranging from 7.0 to 7.5. The designs of all these plants are similar, so their reactions to an earthquake would also...
NEWS
July 24, 2004 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Hunting, fishing and other sports collectibles will be offered at several auctions next week. Whether you are the outdoors type or just a collector, these may appeal to you. The biggest of these sales will take place Thursday in Hatfield, where Alderfer Auction Co. will offer more than more than 200 lots of fishing and sporting collectibles at its weekly sale, beginning at 8 a.m. at the gallery, 501 Fairgrounds Rd. Among the featured items...
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SPORTS
August 9, 2016 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
Philadelphia barely saw Alex Rodriguez during a 22-year career that he tearfully announced Sunday will come to an official close Friday night at Yankee Stadium. We did, however, see him enough to loathe him in much the same way they do in Boston, Baltimore and all of the New York Yankees' rival cities. In fact, Phillies fans have more reason to dislike him than all the other cities combined. Brian Cashman reminded us why Sunday. When asked about the man the Yankees will pay $20 million not to play next season, the team's general manager removed his 2009 World Series ring to make a point.
NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Sam Wood, STAFF WRITER
Belle might just be the walking definition of "lucky dog. " The 18-month-old standard poodle lives to play catch with her owners. But two months ago, the game nearly killed her. In mid-May, Belle was speeding after a ball outside her home in Townsend, Del., when she impaled herself on a 2-foot-long steel rod. Nearly 18 inches of the rod, which had been attached to a scissor jack holding up a camper, was driven into her chest cavity. "It ran right through her, but she didn't whimper once," said owner Lori Broome.
NEWS
April 8, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, STAFF WRITER
IF BENJAMIN FRANKLIN came back to visit the science museum that bears his name, he'd find that a new digital sign along his Ben Franklin Parkway has become something of a lightning rod. After nearly four years of zoning and court battles, the Franklin Institute is expected - in a matter of weeks - to convert its traditional sign, at 20th Street and the parkway, into a digital sign that changes its message every 20 seconds. But if critics have their way, it won't happen. A flurry of emails between L&I Commissioner David Perri and longtime billboard critic Mary C. Tracy suggest that some city officials were exploring ways to stop the sign from going digital.
SPORTS
November 25, 2015 | BY JEFF NEIBURG, Daily News Staff Writer jneiburg@phillynews.com
THE LIGHTS dimmed inside Wells Fargo Center and players from the Flyers and Carolina Hurricanes walked out to their respective benches to watch the ceremony, the Flyers wearing No. 17 patches on their jerseys. A tribute started to play on the video board, showing the newest Flyers Hall of Famer - and current Hurricanes assistant coach - Rod Brind'Amour. Highlights from the eight-plus seasons Brind'Amour spent adorned in orange and black in Philadelphia played with Lynyrd Skynyrd's "Simple Man" as the background music.
NEWS
October 12, 2015 | Marcus Hayes, Daily News Sports Columnist
HAVING CHANGED teams five times in nine years, there isn't much of the football world that 31-year-old Allen Barbre hasn't seen. None of it seems to discourage him. He's a long-term kind of guy. Barbre got no offers from Division I schools, but he made himself a fourth-round pick in 2007 out of Division II football afterthought Missouri Southern. He spent his first two NFL seasons in Green Bay, waiting for a chance to start. He got that chance in 2009 . . . and lost it midway through the season.
NEWS
June 7, 2015 | By Dan McQuade, For The Inquirer
If people had just quit nagging him about it, Tommy Edward would never have started impersonating Rod Stewart. "People would come up to me and say, 'Well, you sound like Rod Stewart, and you look like Rod Stewart,' " Edward said from his studio in Ocean City, Md. "And I was like, 'Maybe I look a little bit like him, but I don't really look like Rod Stewart.' " Edward tried to dodge the comparisons. He grew a goatee. He let his hair grow long and dyed it jet black. It didn't help.
SPORTS
May 13, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
They share your memories. Roy and Gretchen Jackson do - but they have so many more of their own. The Jacksons remember every minute of Preakness day, 2006. It was their horse, Barbaro, who broke down shortly after leaving the starting gate, two weeks after Barbaro had romped in the Kentucky Derby. The Jacksons can remember where they were, who they talked to, their jockey walking over and saying, "I'm sorry, I'm sorry" . . . even the policemen who helped Barbaro get out of Pimlico Race Course, on the road to the New Bolton Center in Chester County, where the horse had surgery for his catastrophic leg fractures the next day, just down the road from their own home in West Grove.
SPORTS
March 31, 2015 | ASSOCIATEDP PRESS
Alex Rodriguez played first base for the first time in his professional career Sunday, handling three chances in three innings during the New York Yankees' 7-0 win over the Houston Astros. "It was fun," Rodriguez said. "It was quite interesting, after 20 years in the league, to see the game from a totally different lens. " The 39-year-old, who lost his third-base job to Chase Headley during a season-long drug suspension, caught Headley's throw following Jose Altuve's grounder leading off the bottom of the first.
SPORTS
March 6, 2015 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
TAMPA, Fla. - Six years ago they were World Series headliners and at the peak of their popularity in their respective cities. Ryan Howard had just hit .333 with two home runs and eight RBIs, winning the NLCS MVP in the Phillies' five-game series win over the Los Angeles Dodgers. He had carried his team back to a second straight World Series for the first time in franchise history. Alex Rodriguez had batted .438 with five home runs and 12 RBIs in nine playoff games to help the New York Yankees get back to the World Series for the first time since 2003.
SPORTS
February 20, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
MAYBE THEY should rename it the Off-The-Wall Street Journal . The conservative daily hired Paula Sassi, a handwriting specialist, to analyze the handwritten statement Alex Rodriquez recently issued in which he apologized for his use of performance-enhancing drugs that led to his seasonlong suspension in 2014. After examining the sample, Sassi - a certified master graphologist - came to the following conclusion about the Yankees one-time slugger. "He writes like a girl," Sassi told the Journal.
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