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Roger Waters

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NEWS
August 25, 1987 | By David Hiltbrand, Special to The Inquirer
When a beach ball floated up from the audience during Roger Waters' concert at the Spectrum last night, a zealous roadie hurriedly carted it off the stage. Frivolity has no place in a Waters show. The former leader of Pink Floyd presented a program of grim and ferocious rock powered by corrosive guitars and wrenching saxophone. As on past tours, an imaginative mix of animation and film was projected onto a large screen behind the musicians. Unfortunately, Waters imposed the muddled concept of his most recent album, Radio K.A.O.
NEWS
July 16, 2012 | By Sam Adams and FOR THE INQUIRER
Given the efficiency with which commercial success trumps contradiction, it was perhaps inevitable that Pink Floyd's The Wall, an album inspired by Roger Waters' distaste for stadium shows, would find its way back into ballparks, more than three decades after its initial release. At Citizens Bank Park on Saturday night, Waters and his 11-piece band were dwarfed by a 40-foot-high "brick" wall that spanned the breadth of the field. As the ensemble played through the album in its entirety, stagehands filled in the gap in the center, oversize imitation brick by oversize imitation brick, until, at the two-hour show's midpoint, Waters and his ensemble were entirely hidden from view.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Would Ryan Howard be able to hit it over this Wall? Pink Floyd mastermind Roger Waters is bringing The Wall , his most impressive musical-theatrical production based on the 1979 double LP that's one of the biggest-selling albums of all time, back to Philadelphia. The bass-playing rock auteur will build up a 40- by-500-foot wall at Citizens Bank Park on July 14, in what's planned as the final stop of a U.S. tour that begins May 1 in Houston. Tickets go on sale Monday at 10 a.m. at livenation.com and comcasttix.com.
NEWS
August 21, 1987 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
Get him blabbing about the "economic interdependence of nations," or the power of communications to "unite the entire world," and rock's longtime prophet of gloom and doom Roger Waters proves a surprisingly positive (verging on utopian) spirit nowadays. His attitudes were recently revealed in a trans-Atlantic phone conversation prompted by the arrival of Waters' "Radio K.A.O.S. " mixed media stage extravaganza at the Spectrum on Monday. The themes are also played out in the "Radio K.A.O.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Steven Wilson has a reputation for crafting meticulously designed, progressive albums of his own, along with his bands Porcupine Tree and No-Man. He has also remastered and remixed classic recordings from King Crimson, Yes, and Roxy Music. Once, he was reticent about touring, but that melted away with time. Starting in earnest with the 2008 album Insurgentes , his solo career has bloomed comparatively late. When on tour, as he is now - with a date Thursday night at the Keswick Theatre - Wilson likes to get out and see what your town is all about.
NEWS
September 18, 2006 | By Patrick Berkery FOR THE INQUIRER
Roger Waters' synapse-goosing performance Saturday at the Tweeter Center was the kind of show that could restore one's faith in the big rock spectacle. It wasn't your garden-variety lasers and flashpots illuminating classic rock warhorses in need of firepower. It fit "The Creative Genius of Pink Floyd," as the former Floyd singer/bassist/composer is billed in promotional literature for his current tour. This was sensory overload done to carefully scripted - though totally thrilling - perfection.
NEWS
June 3, 1994 | By Sam Wood, FOR THE INQUIRER
Though it didn't dazzle with the smarts and media-savvy overload of U2's "Zoo TV" tour, Pink Floyd's mind-numbing spectacle of sight and sound held its audience in thrall last night at the first show of the group's three- night stand at Veterans Stadium. There was a candy-colored cosmic light show that sent tentacles of wintergreen and peppermint-blue rays into the heavens, a series of surreal videos that mixed live-action with animation and made nods to Dali and Magritte, two demon-eyed piggies that emerged from hutches perched over the looming bandshell, and a quadrophonic sound system that rendered the 27-year- old band's music with fidelity unheard in stadiums prior to this tour.
NEWS
May 16, 1988 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
"1988's outdoor concert season picks up where '87's left off, with the sound-and-light spectacle of Pink Floyd. Only the locale has changed - from creaky, creepy JFK Stadium to relatively intimate Veterans Stadium, in a 2 1/ 2-hour show that repeats tonight at sunset. While the Vet really ain't my eye-deal (or ear-deal) of a music hall either, let it be said that Pink Floyd is one (and maybe the only) group that can really make the room "work" - with grand-scale visual special effects and a reverential/sensual rock 'n' roll thunder that hits you from all sides.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1987 | By David Hiltbrand, Special to The Inquirer
Though still embroiled in a legal dispute with former leader Roger Waters over use of the group's name, the remaining members of Pink Floyd - guitarist David Gilmour, drummer Nick Mason and keyboardist Richard Wright - are back with a tour grandiose enough to live up to the band's reputation for road extravaganzas. The show tomorrow night at JFK Stadium, featuring five other musicians and two female singers, is divided into two parts. First the band plays selections like "Learning to Fly" and "Turning Away" from its new album, A Momentary Lapse of Reason.
NEWS
November 11, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
"SideShow" favorite Kenneth Branagh , who a lot of people think is royalty, he's played royals so often, was knighted Friday by Queen Elizabeth II at a dump called Buckingham Palace. Born in Belfast, he's eligible, you see. He's chuffed it happened in this, the year of the queen's Diamond Jubilee and the Olympics: "It's been a hell of a year for the U.K. and I feel very honored to be a tiny part of it. " He got it for his charity work, not his acting. Maybe Elizabeth can give him another!
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Steven Wilson has a reputation for crafting meticulously designed, progressive albums of his own, along with his bands Porcupine Tree and No-Man. He has also remastered and remixed classic recordings from King Crimson, Yes, and Roxy Music. Once, he was reticent about touring, but that melted away with time. Starting in earnest with the 2008 album Insurgentes , his solo career has bloomed comparatively late. When on tour, as he is now - with a date Thursday night at the Keswick Theatre - Wilson likes to get out and see what your town is all about.
NEWS
November 11, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
"SideShow" favorite Kenneth Branagh , who a lot of people think is royalty, he's played royals so often, was knighted Friday by Queen Elizabeth II at a dump called Buckingham Palace. Born in Belfast, he's eligible, you see. He's chuffed it happened in this, the year of the queen's Diamond Jubilee and the Olympics: "It's been a hell of a year for the U.K. and I feel very honored to be a tiny part of it. " He got it for his charity work, not his acting. Maybe Elizabeth can give him another!
NEWS
July 16, 2012 | By Sam Adams and FOR THE INQUIRER
Given the efficiency with which commercial success trumps contradiction, it was perhaps inevitable that Pink Floyd's The Wall, an album inspired by Roger Waters' distaste for stadium shows, would find its way back into ballparks, more than three decades after its initial release. At Citizens Bank Park on Saturday night, Waters and his 11-piece band were dwarfed by a 40-foot-high "brick" wall that spanned the breadth of the field. As the ensemble played through the album in its entirety, stagehands filled in the gap in the center, oversize imitation brick by oversize imitation brick, until, at the two-hour show's midpoint, Waters and his ensemble were entirely hidden from view.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Would Ryan Howard be able to hit it over this Wall? Pink Floyd mastermind Roger Waters is bringing The Wall , his most impressive musical-theatrical production based on the 1979 double LP that's one of the biggest-selling albums of all time, back to Philadelphia. The bass-playing rock auteur will build up a 40- by-500-foot wall at Citizens Bank Park on July 14, in what's planned as the final stop of a U.S. tour that begins May 1 in Houston. Tickets go on sale Monday at 10 a.m. at livenation.com and comcasttix.com.
NEWS
September 21, 2006 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
FOR THE second time in my life, I'm writing a column about Pink Floyd. Specifically, about the man I've always considered to be the brains of the band: Roger Waters. The first time I wrote about him was 26 years ago when I was a high school senior at Central Bucks West in Doylestown and editor of the school paper, the Chatterbux. Back then, I was one of the lucky few to see Pink Floyd perform "The Wall," live at the Nassau County Coliseum on Long Island, N.Y. My review earned me an invitation to the principal's office.
NEWS
September 18, 2006 | By Patrick Berkery FOR THE INQUIRER
Roger Waters' synapse-goosing performance Saturday at the Tweeter Center was the kind of show that could restore one's faith in the big rock spectacle. It wasn't your garden-variety lasers and flashpots illuminating classic rock warhorses in need of firepower. It fit "The Creative Genius of Pink Floyd," as the former Floyd singer/bassist/composer is billed in promotional literature for his current tour. This was sensory overload done to carefully scripted - though totally thrilling - perfection.
NEWS
June 3, 1994 | By Sam Wood, FOR THE INQUIRER
Though it didn't dazzle with the smarts and media-savvy overload of U2's "Zoo TV" tour, Pink Floyd's mind-numbing spectacle of sight and sound held its audience in thrall last night at the first show of the group's three- night stand at Veterans Stadium. There was a candy-colored cosmic light show that sent tentacles of wintergreen and peppermint-blue rays into the heavens, a series of surreal videos that mixed live-action with animation and made nods to Dali and Magritte, two demon-eyed piggies that emerged from hutches perched over the looming bandshell, and a quadrophonic sound system that rendered the 27-year- old band's music with fidelity unheard in stadiums prior to this tour.
NEWS
April 8, 1994 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
THE DIVISION BELL Pink Floyd / Columbia Gawd, do these guys miss the mean-spirited railing of fuming former partner Roger Waters. I'd even settle for the drug-addled hallucinations of their long-lost soulmate Syd Barrett. Despite a seven-year gap since their last (and very good) "A Momentary Lapse of Reason" album, Messrs. Gilmour, Mason and Wright seem to be sleepwalking, resting on atmosphere pandering to the troops. "A Great Day for Freedom" does enjoy a majestic, anthem-like aura.
NEWS
May 16, 1988 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
"1988's outdoor concert season picks up where '87's left off, with the sound-and-light spectacle of Pink Floyd. Only the locale has changed - from creaky, creepy JFK Stadium to relatively intimate Veterans Stadium, in a 2 1/ 2-hour show that repeats tonight at sunset. While the Vet really ain't my eye-deal (or ear-deal) of a music hall either, let it be said that Pink Floyd is one (and maybe the only) group that can really make the room "work" - with grand-scale visual special effects and a reverential/sensual rock 'n' roll thunder that hits you from all sides.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1987 | By David Hiltbrand, Special to The Inquirer
Though still embroiled in a legal dispute with former leader Roger Waters over use of the group's name, the remaining members of Pink Floyd - guitarist David Gilmour, drummer Nick Mason and keyboardist Richard Wright - are back with a tour grandiose enough to live up to the band's reputation for road extravaganzas. The show tomorrow night at JFK Stadium, featuring five other musicians and two female singers, is divided into two parts. First the band plays selections like "Learning to Fly" and "Turning Away" from its new album, A Momentary Lapse of Reason.
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