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Rogue Cops

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NEWS
June 1, 1995
A former police commissioner, shortly after his appointment, was asked what he considered to be the major problem confronting him. He didn't pause for a second. "Corruption," he replied. He wasn't saying corruption is particularly widespread in the Philadelphia Police Department; there's no reason to believe it is. What he meant (and other knowledgeable observers agree) was that the temptations confronting police officers day in and day out are too much for a few to resist.
NEWS
November 29, 1996 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Several years ago, Philadelphia Highway Patrol Officer Allen L. Wilson raced to the scene of a reported burglary, arriving in time to prevent a drug-related homicide, federal authorities say. Mission accomplished, Wilson and an unnamed partner then took $11,000 in drug profits from the intended victim, a man named Butchy, and, instead of turning in the cash to the department, they kept it Wilson, 40, a cop for 17 years who admitted stealing more...
NEWS
December 30, 2010
A newly released report detailing city police arbitration cases sheds new light on an old problem: getting rid of the bad apples on the force. A review of 46 cases over the last decade reveals an ineffective disciplinary system that seems to favor bad conduct. Officers dismissed for serious violations often get reinstated by arbitrators with back pay. The decisions were made outside of public scrutiny, and the outcomes probably would have remained secret. But a Common Pleas Court judge rightfully ruled in favor of the Daily News, which waged an 18-month legal battle to obtain police grievance arbitration decisions.
NEWS
March 10, 1992 | by Joe O'Dowd and Kurt Heine, Daily News Staff Writers Staff writer Jack McGuire contributed to this report
Raphael Perez had a feeling that the Colombians - the ones he owed $12,000 in a dope deal - would be trouble. But not like this. Not kidnap his 2-year-old son, his girlfriend, and another relative and her 2-year-old daughter. Not hold them hostage in a Bucks County hotel room and demand $30,000 for their lives. Perez went to the cops for help. That's when he learned his problems had gone far deeper than disgruntled Colombian dope peddlers. His problems, according to detectives, appeared to involve one and possibly two rogue state troopers working in Philadelphia as undercover narcotics investigators.
NEWS
February 23, 1996
It's not a bad idea, Philadelphia District Attorney Lynne M. Abraham's notion of a special unit to investigate rogue cops, though city residents must wonder why such a unit doesn't already exist. To her credit, Ms. Abraham has said pungently what other high city officials seem loath to concede: "The corruption investigation has rocked . . . the whole Police Department up to the commissioner. You cannot just sit back and continue with your old procedures. "You have to do something.
NEWS
September 18, 1995
Nobody ever said it was going to be cheap, having rogue Philadelphia cops bully, rob and frame the citizens they're charged with protecting. What, after all, is the right price tag for being tossed in jail for three years on trumped-up charges? How about the theft of your nest egg during a bogus drug raid? Or having a gun put to your head in an abandoned rowhouse? Civil suits stemming from the 39th District police scandal will seek to define those numbers on behalf of the people who were wronged by dishonest cops.
NEWS
January 16, 2002
Better late than never for the Philadelphia Police Department to come down hard on two high-ranking officers who covered up a drinking-and-driving mishap in 1998. At least one officer's resignation in the face of likely criminal charges addresses the core issue: How could these guys have kept their badges? Any motorist knows what Police Department investigators are saying only now - that criminal charges should be filed against the two captains, James J. Brady, whose resignation was reported yesterday, and Joseph J. DiLacqua.
NEWS
March 30, 1991 | By ROGER E. HERNANDEZ
Two points about the case of the police in Los Angeles. And, two, in spite of the very real problem of violent cops, the urgent crisis in the inner cities is street crime, not police brutality. But first things first. The attack on King was not one of those tough split-second decisions police have to make to protect their lives in crime- ridden neighborhoods. This was not a case in which suspect makes sudden move, cop reaches for gun, bang-bang, dead suspect had no gun after all. This was a case of a suspect lying down, helpless and being beaten senseless for no rational reason.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Staff Writer
DISGUSTING. Unbelievable. Sickening. There are a thousand more adjectives to describe yesterday's astounding news that no criminal charges will be brought against the cops who terrorized 22 Philly bodega owners. But you need to understand this: The shop owners were all legal immigrants. None had criminal records. Nor had they ever met - they hailed from four corners of the city and spoke different languages. Yet the stories they told Daily News reporters Barbara Laker and Wendy Ruderman were identical: A Philadelphia plainclothes narcotics squad had barreled into the immigrants' bodegas, guns drawn.
NEWS
December 6, 1995 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The Philadelphia chapter of the NAACP is set to sue the city next week in federal court in the wake of admitted police abuses and civil rights violations in the scandal-plagued 39th Police District in North Philadelphia. The class-action suit, which is supported by the American Civil Liberties Union and the Police-Barrio Relations Project, is an attempt "to change the way the Police Department operates," said attorney David Rudovsky, one of the lawyers who will litigate the case.
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NEWS
June 11, 2014
PHILADELPHIA'S unemployment rate showed a promising decline recently, and although things could be on an upturn, the long-term health of a big, old city like ours is by no means a sure thing - especially with intractable problems of schools and crime. One worrisome factor behind the city's crime rate is a troubled Police Department. And new evidence of those troubles should raise red flags not just for the city's leadership but for all of us. According to a recent Daily News report, civil-rights lawsuit settlements reached a new high in 2013 of nearly $20 million to settle 207 claims.
NEWS
April 30, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
IT HAPPENED. It actually happened. Philly stopped shrugging long enough to call BS on cops getting a pass from the feds for allegedly preying on some of the city's most vulnerable. And that outrage led the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office to review the cases of two women who said they were groped by one of the cops. No word if they'll revisit the 22 Philly bodega owners who said they were robbed and roughed up. "It makes sense for us to do this now given the criticism we've received for something we never looked at before," First Assistant District Attorney Ed McCann said.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Staff Writer
DISGUSTING. Unbelievable. Sickening. There are a thousand more adjectives to describe yesterday's astounding news that no criminal charges will be brought against the cops who terrorized 22 Philly bodega owners. But you need to understand this: The shop owners were all legal immigrants. None had criminal records. Nor had they ever met - they hailed from four corners of the city and spoke different languages. Yet the stories they told Daily News reporters Barbara Laker and Wendy Ruderman were identical: A Philadelphia plainclothes narcotics squad had barreled into the immigrants' bodegas, guns drawn.
NEWS
March 17, 2014
Reading the laundry list of allegations of abuse that suspended Police Officer Kevin Corcoran has faced over the years, it's hard to believe the Philadelphia cop wasn't kicked off the force before now. Give modern technology credit for finally nabbing him. Witnesses pulled out their cellphones to record Corcoran's violent arrest last year of an Iraq War veteran who had the audacity to yell at the officer for driving in the wrong direction on a one-way...
NEWS
January 9, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
THIS COLUMN is for families and friends of Philly police officers. We need your help. Or, rather, Vinny Vella needs your help. Vinny - who has just joined the Daily News ' dogged band of police reporters - writes today's story about Philly cops Brandon Bryant, David Quaintance and Tighe Wingrove. They saved the lives of two wounded men by using tourniquets to stop the victims from bleeding to death. It's a feel-good piece about hot-damn police work. We want to tell more stories like this (which resulted from a fellow reporter's tip)
NEWS
December 10, 2013
"WHY SO MANY bad cops?" I asked in October. That column brought a lot of reaction, from citizens and current and past officers, some with questions, some with suggestions. In the light of continuing personnel problems - it seems to fall short of a crisis (or does it?) - and in an effort to clear up misconceptions about the Philadelphia Police Department, I requested some time with Commissioner Charles Ramsey. I wanted to know about the quality and training of recruits, and more. I hate to explode widespread myths, but the Police Department does not hire high-school dropouts, nor does race play a role in hiring, Ramsey told me. Let's start with race, that evergreen and explosive topic.
TRAVEL
June 17, 2013 | By Elaine Rose, For The Inquirer
It was time to put up or shut up. I had been talking about moving to Canada for nearly a decade. Nine months after leaving my job, I was too distracted to finish my latest writing project. A friend suggested I hole up in British Columbia for a couple of months to complete the work and get a taste of life north of the border. After my meteorologist friend in Omaha told me it wasn't downright crazy to attempt a drive to Western Canada in the dead of winter, I started planning. Using Craigslist, I found a pet-friendly rental for February and March in Powell River, a small city on British Columbia's Sunshine Coast.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Warsaw in 1937 was a city full of intrigue. A city crawling with spies. A city on the brink of war. Its story is told in BBC America's superb, gorgeously shot mini-series Spies of Warsaw , which premieres Wednesday. It's one of two major new TV dramas this week, along with Rogue , a gritty, violent cop series from DirectTV's Audience Network, which also begins Wednesday, with a feature-length pilot. Spies of Warsaw is a lush, classic spy yarn starring David Tennant ( Doctor Who , Hamlet )
NEWS
February 1, 2013 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A former Camden City police officer who admitted his role in a corrupt antidrug unit and cooperated with federal authorities was sentenced today to 46 months in prison. Jason Stetser was the last of four former police officers convicted as a result of the investigation to learn his fate. The case has resulted in payouts totaling more than $3.8 million to some of those who had been arrested by the rogue group. Standing before U.S. District Court Judge Robert Kugler in Camden, Stetser, 34, apologized to all he had hurt and said, "I am ashamed of my actions.
NEWS
May 4, 2012 | Stu Bykofsky
THE PHILADELPHIA Parking Authority is spotlighted in an A&E cable TV show titled "Parking Wars. " If A&E were to do one on the Philadelphia Police Department, I suggest the title "Fireproof. " Just what do you have to do to get yourself fired, if you're a Philadelphia cop? Just how bad to the bone must you be? The latest awful example is Officer Michael Paige, 45, driving a patrol car marked with the words "Honor, Service, Integrity" — the Philly cops motto — but his honor is besmirched, his service suspect, his integrity questioned.
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