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Role Models

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NEWS
August 30, 1986
In an Aug. 22 article of the "inexplicable" shooting of 14 people in Edmond, Okla., by a "disgruntled colleague," the Rev. Dale Carter is quoted as wondering whether there is something "wrong" with their community. Really, people who use violence and kill others in order to solve problems are following the role models and leadership of our society. After all, a "disgruntled" President Reagan recommends using violence and killing when he backs the contras in Nicaragua. He used these methods in Grenada.
NEWS
June 30, 1990 | By SANFORD PINSKER
In the face of it nothing sounds more reasonable than the request - increasingly sounded by students across the academic spectrum - that they be taught by those who will be especially sympathetic to their minority status, and who might thus act as positive role models. While I'm also concerned about the shoddy use of language such as "role modeling" and "empowerment," what gives me the willies are the implications of such demands. Increasingly, students and faculties alike are prone to take the short view.
NEWS
December 1, 2003
Concerning Michelle Malkin's 11/17/03 OP/ED piece, entitled "Just Another Dumb-Blonde Joke," about Jessica Simpson and other Hollywood "dummies" as poor role models for our children. Aren't conservatives cute when they're self-righteous? I'll be the first to admit that I have never watched Jessica Simpson's show, nor do I plan to, and all I know about it is what I have read in the paper. But as I read Ms. Malkin's "fair and balanced" rant, I thought of some other Hollywood "dummies" that she neglected to mention . . . perhaps intentionally.
NEWS
July 15, 1999 | By Ellen Goodman
So this is what it's like to be a soccer mom. Hold the minivan. Forget about the pollsters. Never mind the demographic cliches. It's about taking pride in the sheer, sweaty, muscular joy of the go-for-broke winners. It's about taking pleasure in the faces of girls in the stands, faces painted red, white and blue, instead of blush-on pink and mascara black. On Saturday, some 90,000 fans filled the Rose Bowl in the glaring afternoon sun to watch 20 women pass and kick their way up and down a scoreless field.
NEWS
September 13, 2008 | By Alfred Lubrano, Peter Mucha and Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Miles Mack was gunned down at a basketball tournament that he'd founded to save and serve a community he once referred to as "my people. " In that quick and brutal act, a city starved for role models lost one of its best. And a good man who had stepped up to make a difference was apparently victimized by the same tough guys and "hard-headed" kids he had worked all his life to help. "He was on the front lines," said Rick Young, a friend and the chief executive officer of the Mantua Community Improvement Committee.
NEWS
May 23, 1991 | By Gordon Mayer, Special to The Inquirer
Last October Marie Skertic became a big sister. There were no births or adoptions in her family - she joined Burlington County's Family Companion Program and met Rose, an unwed mother she now visits once a week. "If I have to get something off my chest, she's there to listen," said Rose, who wants to be a veterinarian's assistant. The former Mount Laurel resident thinks of 29-year-old Skertic as her "big sister. " Eighteen volunteers, all of them women, do for the 17 Burlington County families they work with what big sisters, aunts or even mothers often do. The service is part of the Family Companion Program sponsored by the Mental Health Association in New Jersey.
NEWS
August 21, 2007 | By Gail Shister, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Having served their time, convicted drug dealers Daniel Mangini and Steven Roberts, a couple for more than 20 years, were eager to resume their life together. Both had survived a hellish descent into methamphetamine addiction, and had emerged from prison clean and sober. Both were ready to serve their five-year parole, with mandatory weekly drug-testing and counseling. Any dreams of a reunion for the Montgomery County men quickly dissolved, however, when they learned they could not have any contact.
NEWS
July 9, 1993 | BY MIKE ROYKO
There has been a debate about role models lately. It started when Charles Barkley did a Nike commercial saying that he is not a role model, he is a basketball player, and that it's the job of parents to be their children's role models. This prompted other basketball stars to say, no, Charles is wrong, and that as a public figure, he must accept the responsibility of being a role model. I agree with Barkley. The ability to jump high and slam-dunk a basketball has entertainment value and pays well, but compared with other skills - such as collecting garbage - it really doesn't make the world a better place to live.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 4, 2016 | By Michael Smerconish
This summer, I've been reading past columns I've written for both the Sunday Inquirer and the Daily News. I began as a columnist at the latter in 2001 and for the next 10 years, my work ran every Thursday. In 2007 I began writing separately for the Sunday Inquirer and for four years, I had the unique honor of writing for both newspapers. In 2011, I scaled back to just the Inquirer. By my count, I wrote a total of 489 columns for the Daily News and this is my 555th column for the Inquirer.
NEWS
June 8, 2016
ISSUE | MUHAMMAD ALI A role model for us all Muhammad Ali was a near-mythical figure with a worldwide reputation and aura ("The Greatest," Sunday). He was arguably the best heavyweight fighter of all time, but we remember his life for demonstrating so much more than that. He was an iconic civil rights advocate and a prodigious fund-raiser for the Parkinson's disease that ended his life at 74. More importantly, he was devoted to his faith. Rather than be drafted and serve in the military, which he objected to on religious grounds, he was stripped of his boxing title and faced imprisonment.
SPORTS
May 1, 2016 | By Jeff McLane, STAFF WRITER
Carson Wentz stared down at his brother, Zach, and smiled. For most of his life, the new Eagles quarterback looked up, both literally and figuratively, to his older brother. It's a common tale - the younger sibling chasing the older one until he catches up and finally surpasses him. But Carson Wentz's story is his own, and even if it rings familiar, that doesn't mean it's not worth the telling. The way Wentz recounts it, he wouldn't have been where he was on Friday - standing behind the podium at the NovaCare Complex as the Eagles' top draft pick, before an auditorium full of people and cameras - without his brother.
SPORTS
April 22, 2016 | By John Smallwood, DAILY NEWS COLUMNIST
OSTENSIBLY, it was a celebration of the life of Philadelphia sports and philanthropic icon Ed Snider, but toward the end of the program, Jay Snider, Ed's son, revealed some of the last words his father spoke to him in their last conversation before he passed on April 11 at age 83. "This is what he said, not just for me or the family," Jay Snider said. "He told me, and so I'll tell you. "Quote - the last sentence he ever spoke was, 'I can't thank the Flyers enough for everything they've given to me and my family.' " Perhaps the most amazing thing about the event at the Wells Fargo Center, which was attended by thousands, was the variety of people who spoke to memorialize the man referred to as "Mr. Snider," but whose great wish was for people simply to call him "Ed. " From hockey representatives such as NHL commissioner Gary Bettman and Flyers captain for life Bob Clarke to businessmen such as Comcast CEO Brian Roberts and former PRISM/Comcast SportsNet president Jack Williams to even Mayor Kenney, the list of speakers illustrated the many segments of Philadelphia society Snider impacted.
NEWS
March 11, 2016 | By Steven Bohnel, Staff Writer
BIOLOGICALLY, Ryan Ciolli was John Moffat's nephew. But after Ciolli's father left him at the age of 3, John raised him as if he was his son. Because of John's support, Ryan legally changed his name to Ryan Moffat in June 2011, when he married. "I wanted my kids to know who he was," Ciolli, now 34, said. "And to be able to identify with the last name of him rather than my father, who they'll never meet and never had any real role in raising me. " John Moffat, 63, a lifelong resident of Andorra, died March 6 of cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2016 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
Filmmaker Gilberto Gonzalez has fond memories of growing up in the 1970s in the Puerto Rican enclave of Spring Garden. On weekends - when he woke up in the morning or fell asleep at night - he listened to men in the nearby park singing and drumming songs from their island home. But those also were tough times in Philadelphia's original barrio , darkened by violence with non-Puerto Ricans and ongoing tension with law enforcement. And it's the reason the 20Gs came to be the protectors of the neighborhood.
SPORTS
January 17, 2016 | By Keith Pompey, STAFF WRITER
Jason Richardson is the 76ers' latest special guest. The former Sixer attended Thursday's game and was on hand for Friday's practice. He said he expected to leave on Saturday. The Sixers (4-37) had reached out to Richardson about coming out of retirement to provide veteran leadership to the club before Elton Brand accepted the role. Coach Brett Brown said Richardson's visit didn't involve a possible position with the Sixers. "I don't think he's got any desire," Brown said.
NEWS
November 22, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
CINCINNATI - To Otis Hackney, it felt like a wonderland. Inside Oyler Community Learning Center, a public school in a tough neighborhood here, were things the Philadelphia principal could only dream of. There were vision, medical, and dental clinics. A food bank. A day-care center and a mental-health wing with five therapists. Volunteers trooped into the school routinely, part of a rotation of well-trained help that works one-on-one with Oyler's kids. "I thought," the South Philadelphia High principal said later, "it was awesome . " Oyler is a "community school," a phrase about to become much more familiar in Philadelphia, where the mayor-elect has pledged to establish 25 of them in four years.
SPORTS
July 27, 2015 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
When it came time to clean out his office at the Prudential Center in Newark, N.J., Lou Lamoriello probably didn't have much work ahead of him. He decorated the place sparsely on purpose - no photos of his family or friends or former coaches and players, not a touchstone from his personal past to be found, nothing to obscure his single-minded focus. One day in February 2011, as Lamoriello sat behind his desk for an interview, the only accoutrements in the room were seven replica trophies atop a shelf: four of the Prince of Wales Trophy, awarded to the winner of the NHL's Eastern Conference, and three of the Stanley Cup. He added one more to that collection the following year, when the New Jersey Devils reached the Stanley Cup Finals for the last time during Lamoriello's tenure, and by now he's likely boxed up those trophies and shipped them to Ontario.
NEWS
June 22, 2015 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
After years at the mike for WXPN, Michaela Majoun, the voice of morning for thousands of music-hungry people locally and worldwide, is stepping over to her other love: writing. She came to what was then a pretty good college station in 1989, the first professional on-air host the station had ever hired. Since then, and largely thanks to her efforts, XPN has become a cultural hub, connecting fans to artists they might not have known about, organizing concerts, conventions, and events such as the XPoNential Music Festival, with an especially splendid lineup Wednesday through Friday.
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