CollectionsRomaine Lettuce
IN THE NEWS

Romaine Lettuce

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 12, 1992 | By Alan Sipress, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dawn is just breaking over the 120 acres of land that Maurice Barsuglia's grandfather began farming half a century ago. From the family homestead on Panther Road in Vineland, N.J., Barsuglia places a call to South Philadelphia, to the purchasing agent at the Dichter Bros. and Glass store in the regional produce center. Barsuglia asks how much romaine lettuce they want today. About 100 boxes, comes the answer. By 6 a.m., a few members of the Barsuglia family and a half-dozen farm laborers are out in the fields, cutting 2,400 heads of lettuce he planted two months earlier.
FOOD
April 4, 2013
Makes 4 servings 1 romaine lettuce heart, core    removed, cut in 1/2-inch pieces 2 large celery ribs, leaves    trimmed, cut in 1/2-inch pieces 2 ripe avocados, peeled,pitted, cut in    1/2-inch pieces 1 can (14 oz.) hearts of palm,    drained, cut in 1/2-inch pieces 2 ripe tomatoes, cored, cut in    1/2-inch pieces 1 cup canned    chickpeas, drained 1 teaspoon fine sea salt,    plus more to taste 1/4 teaspoon freshly    ground black pepper Juice of 1 lemon 2 tablespoons extra virgin    olive oil 1/4 cup finely chopped    fresh    cilantro   (optional)
FOOD
January 12, 1997 | By Bev Bennett, FOR THE INQUIRER
You don't have to be a marketing expert to know that Caesar salad is the hottest thing between tongs. It has two essential qualities going for it: ease of preparation and flavor. Even the most basic Caesar salad of romaine lettuce, croutons and bottled dressing tastes good. Do it from scratch with good-quality Parmesan cheese, anchovies and extra-virgin olive oil and it's a feast. One of the things you'll note about Caesar salad is how versatile it is. You can make it more substantial by adding strips of grilled chicken or salmon or cooked shrimp; or make it lighter by skipping the traditional coddled egg. You can even take the essential ingredients and replay them in a new form, as Caesar Sandwich.
FOOD
January 8, 1995 | By Bev Bennett, FOR THE INQUIRER
Sometimes a dish has a combination of ingredients that come together in a taste sensation that is so marvelous and universal that there's no reason to limit the basic formula to that one dish. For example, mushrooms sauteed with a little butter, cream and brandy is a delicious side dish, but you could serve it in a risotto, over spaghetti, or as a soup if it is thinned with chicken stock. Or, think of how creative cooks have transformed the classic bacon, lettuce and tomato sandwich into salad, using the bread as croutons.
FOOD
July 27, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
If Caesar Cardini were alive, would he recognize the salad that bears his name? Probably not. Just imagine the inventor of the Caesar ordering his baby at some of our more fashionable restaurants: Once it would arrive topped with strips of grilled chicken breast, another time garnished with crabmeat, sun-dried tomatoes or roasted poblano peppers. Yet another version might feature seven- grain croutons or a low-fat, eggless dressing. Caesar salad - that slippery, pungent classic of romaine lettuce, anchovies, Parmesan cheese and creamy, garlicky dressing - has changed with the nutritional times and the maturing American palate.
NEWS
May 8, 2010
Soft money OKd for redistricting WASHINGTON - Members of Congress helping their parties finance redistricting fights can raise soft money, the unlimited corporate and union cash that a 2002 law bans them from collecting for their campaigns, the Federal Election Commission said Friday. The FEC unanimously granted the National Democratic Redistricting Trust's request to let lawmakers raise unlimited contributions and money from corporations and unions for the likely legal battles as congressional district boundaries are redrawn after the 2010 census.
FOOD
March 14, 1993 | By Bev Bennett, FOR THE INQUIRER
In this age of safe food, it's curious that there's so much interest in the Caesar salad. This classic recipe, which had all but vanished from restaurant menus, is again making an appearance. Stacked high with romaine lettuce, anchovies and croutons, it has an obvious visual appeal. But what supposedly gives this sensational salad its character is a coddled egg. It's not completely raw, yet it's also not cooked enough to ensure that any possible trace of salmonella contamination has been destroyed.
NEWS
July 22, 2010
10 tablespoons unsalted butter 1 1/4 cups sugar 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon lavender buds cup plus 2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract 2 large eggs 1/2 cup all-purpose flour Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Put sugar and lavender buds in a food processor and pulse together. Set a double boiler or a heatproof bowl over a pot of simmering water. Add butter, lavender sugar, cocoa and salt, stirring occasionally until the butter melts and the mixture becomes fairly smooth and hot. Remove from heat and let cool until the mixture is warm.
NEWS
May 10, 2013
Company description: " 'Zoë' means 'life' in Greek, and this is embraced in every aspect of Zoës Kitchen. We embrace the Mediterranean way of life - that a fulfilled, happy life is one shared with family, good friends, great food and that eating wholesome, fresh ingredients is key. " Location: Marlton, N.J. (also in Collegeville and Newtown, Bucks County; coming May 20 to Bryn Mawr). Nutrition information: Zoës is one of a new breed of fast-food chains that emphasize healthy eating.
FOOD
March 5, 1997 | by Rose DeWolf Daily News Staff Writer
Through the night, three large stainless-steel machines in Harleysville, Montgomery County, chop 2,000 to 3,000 pounds of fresh celery. Nearby, other machines slice and dice other salad ingredients: onions, peppers, radishes. Chicken and tuna for chicken salad and tuna salad are folded with celery and mayonnaise. The pasta for the pasta salads is cooked - al dente. This is the Isabelle's Kitchen division of T.J. Pupillo Co., where salad-bar offerings like "sunshine salads" and "crunchy pea medleys" are born.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 10, 2013
Company description: " 'Zoë' means 'life' in Greek, and this is embraced in every aspect of Zoës Kitchen. We embrace the Mediterranean way of life - that a fulfilled, happy life is one shared with family, good friends, great food and that eating wholesome, fresh ingredients is key. " Location: Marlton, N.J. (also in Collegeville and Newtown, Bucks County; coming May 20 to Bryn Mawr). Nutrition information: Zoës is one of a new breed of fast-food chains that emphasize healthy eating.
FOOD
May 10, 2013 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
This is the ninth in a series on healthy cooking classes at St. Martin De Porres School in North Philadelphia. As our cooking classes wind down - just one more to go! - I still want to introduce healthy meals, but I also long to teach these 11-year-old girls to make something they really love. I figured smoothies were a good bet, and I knew better than to whip up the banana, kale, flaxseed, and almond milk concoctions I love. I'd go with a basic banana-yogurt-honey blend, and present it as an alternative to the fast-food banana milkshake Jayla Reeves loves.
FOOD
April 4, 2013
Makes 4 servings 1 romaine lettuce heart, core    removed, cut in 1/2-inch pieces 2 large celery ribs, leaves    trimmed, cut in 1/2-inch pieces 2 ripe avocados, peeled,pitted, cut in    1/2-inch pieces 1 can (14 oz.) hearts of palm,    drained, cut in 1/2-inch pieces 2 ripe tomatoes, cored, cut in    1/2-inch pieces 1 cup canned    chickpeas, drained 1 teaspoon fine sea salt,    plus more to taste 1/4 teaspoon freshly    ground black pepper Juice of 1 lemon 2 tablespoons extra virgin    olive oil 1/4 cup finely chopped    fresh    cilantro   (optional)
NEWS
July 22, 2010
10 tablespoons unsalted butter 1 1/4 cups sugar 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon lavender buds cup plus 2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract 2 large eggs 1/2 cup all-purpose flour Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Put sugar and lavender buds in a food processor and pulse together. Set a double boiler or a heatproof bowl over a pot of simmering water. Add butter, lavender sugar, cocoa and salt, stirring occasionally until the butter melts and the mixture becomes fairly smooth and hot. Remove from heat and let cool until the mixture is warm.
NEWS
May 8, 2010
Soft money OKd for redistricting WASHINGTON - Members of Congress helping their parties finance redistricting fights can raise soft money, the unlimited corporate and union cash that a 2002 law bans them from collecting for their campaigns, the Federal Election Commission said Friday. The FEC unanimously granted the National Democratic Redistricting Trust's request to let lawmakers raise unlimited contributions and money from corporations and unions for the likely legal battles as congressional district boundaries are redrawn after the 2010 census.
LIVING
July 30, 2000 | By Marian Uhlman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Camp food has come a long way since a favorite ditty was: The meatballs that they give us They say are mighty fine, One rolled off the table And hurt a friend of mine. Mystery meat is out, and restaurant-style menus with salad bars are in as camps try to please growing numbers of vegetarian campers and children with more diverse tastes - not to mention health-minded parents. "I have seen a real consciousness-raising in the camps about food and the importance of proper nutrition," said Jeffrey Solomon, executive director of the National Camp Association, which helps families find sleep-away camps.
NEWS
August 25, 1999 | by Jaclyn D'Auria, For the Daily News
Since I have yet to experience a meal on a cruise ship, I thought it would be interesting to venture to downtown Swedesboro and experience dinner at Botto's Italian Line Restaurant. As the restaurant's slogan proclaims, "Why go to the Italian Riviera on the beautiful Mediterranean Sea? Come to Botto's Italian Line Restaurant. " Sounds reasonable. I didn't need a passport, and I could forget the Dramamine. The "Italian Line" part of the name is not meant to impart a nautical theme.
NEWS
March 10, 1999 | by Beth D'Addono, For the Daily News
Sports bars and food don't always go together. But that's not the case at Champps, the popular Marlton watering hole dominated by large screen TVs and sports memorabilia. On a recent rainy Wednesday night, the place was mobbed, which is saying something, considering that Champps can hold up to 500 hungry sports fans. Maybe the crowds were drawn by the karaoke contest planned for 9:30 p.m. - $300 in cash prizes, step right up. Whatever the reason, there was a 15-minute wait for a table, and the place was buzzing.
FOOD
March 5, 1997 | by Rose DeWolf Daily News Staff Writer
Through the night, three large stainless-steel machines in Harleysville, Montgomery County, chop 2,000 to 3,000 pounds of fresh celery. Nearby, other machines slice and dice other salad ingredients: onions, peppers, radishes. Chicken and tuna for chicken salad and tuna salad are folded with celery and mayonnaise. The pasta for the pasta salads is cooked - al dente. This is the Isabelle's Kitchen division of T.J. Pupillo Co., where salad-bar offerings like "sunshine salads" and "crunchy pea medleys" are born.
FOOD
January 12, 1997 | By Bev Bennett, FOR THE INQUIRER
You don't have to be a marketing expert to know that Caesar salad is the hottest thing between tongs. It has two essential qualities going for it: ease of preparation and flavor. Even the most basic Caesar salad of romaine lettuce, croutons and bottled dressing tastes good. Do it from scratch with good-quality Parmesan cheese, anchovies and extra-virgin olive oil and it's a feast. One of the things you'll note about Caesar salad is how versatile it is. You can make it more substantial by adding strips of grilled chicken or salmon or cooked shrimp; or make it lighter by skipping the traditional coddled egg. You can even take the essential ingredients and replay them in a new form, as Caesar Sandwich.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|