CollectionsRome
IN THE NEWS

Rome

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 21, 1996 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The plot thickens in an unusual legal battle pitting the city of Rome against Philadelphia lawyer and Barnes Foundation president Richard H. Glanton. The Italian city sued Glanton and the foundation last month, claiming he had reneged on an oral agreement to make Rome a stop on the Barnes Foundation's celebrated and never-to-be-repeated world art tour. Glanton's lawyer, Robert J. Sugarman, now claims the suit in federal court in Philadelphia should be dismissed because "no action has been taken by the city of Rome to authorize the litigation.
NEWS
May 18, 1989 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Giovanni Battista Piranesi (1720-1778) was the most celebrated printmaker of 18th-century Europe. He is best known today for his "prison" etchings - cavernous, gloomy chambers characterized by complex perspectival views, massive arches and grand staircases spiraling upward toward indeterminate destinations. It has been suggested that these striking architectural medleys, which Piranesi called Carceri, depict the Mamartine prisons of ancient Rome, but there isn't any evidence for this view.
LIVING
May 16, 1996 | By Carlin Romano, INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
Imagine the Bolshoi Ballet inviting the Mummers to dance with it around Red Square. Well, no - let's upscale this a bit. How about the Vienna Philharmonic asking the Philadelphia Orchestra to play a joint concert in Austria? Closer. Now cut the music, heighten the high seriousness (yes, even more), and you've got the distinguished adventure that will begin Sunday for Philadelphia's very own American Philosophical Society, founded by Benjamin Franklin in 1743, the oldest learned society in the United States.
SPORTS
May 19, 2007 | Daily News Wire Services
Serena Williams hasn't played the French Open in 3 years and hardly seems ready for this month's clay-court major. She made an array of mistakes yesterday in her final match before the French Open, losing to Patty Schnyder, 6-3, 2-6, 7-6 (5), at the Italian Open quarterfinals in Rome. "I'm going to obviously want to work harder and just do some things differently," Williams said. "Where I am today, in Paris I'll probably be even better. " In the semifinals, Schnyder will face third-seeded Jelena Jankovic, who routed Elena Dementieva, 6-2, 6-1. Second-seeded Svetlana Kuznetsova beat sixth-seeded Dinara Safina, 6-1, 6-3, in an all-Russian match and will next play ninth-seeded Daniela Hantuchova, who beat unseeded Anabel Medina Garrigues, 7-6 (8)
NEWS
December 31, 1989 | By Donald D. Groff, Special to The Inquirer
My wife, who is handicapped, and I plan to visit Rome, and we're wondering what sites are accessible to wheelchairs. Where can we get such information? - B.B., Downingtown Contact the Travel Information Service at Moss Rehabilitation Hospital, 12th Street and Tabor Road, Philadelphia 19141, or phone 456-9600, for a packet that can tell you what to expect. There's a nominal fee to cover handling and postage. These organizations and publications also may be helpful to you: Society for the Advancement of Travel for the Handicapped (SATH)
SPORTS
May 19, 2000 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
An awkward move during practice, a sudden wrenching pain in her lower back, and No. 1-ranked Lindsay Davenport joined the growing list of top women tennis players with injuries heading into the French Open. The 23-year-old American pulled out of the Italian Open in Rome before the third round yesterday after suffering what tournament officials called an acute low-back strain. Later, the tournament lost its defending champion when Venus Williams was beaten by 17-year-old Australian Jelena Dokic, 6-1, 6-2. Magnus Norman stayed on course for consecutive titles when he beat Younes El Aynaoui, 3-6, 6-1, 6-4, to reach the quarterfinals of the German Open in Hamburg.
SPORTS
January 22, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Sixteen players from Ethiopia's national soccer team disappeared yesterday during a stopover in Rome while on their way to a tournament in Morocco, Italian officials said. Two players, the coach and four staff members of the team remained behind in a hotel in Ostia, near Rome's international airport. It was not immediately clear why the players had not made their flight for the African National Cup. "We don't know anything about their motivation," said police officer Luigi D'Angelis, adding that the group that remained behind - who reported the disappearance - couldn't explain, either.
NEWS
January 18, 2004 | By Libby Newnam FOR THE INQUIRER
It came as a surprise. It came as a big fat surprise. In fact, if you were to rank surprises in order, this one would come right after finding out your grandmother was pregnant. We got a call. A friend had two tickets to Rome. He couldn't use them and he wanted to give them to us. Free. Would we go? Would we? Is the Pope Catholic? (And if I didn't know that one, Rome was just the place to find out.) So we were off, the three of us: me, my husband, and his fear of flying.
TRAVEL
October 2, 2011 | By Paula Marantz Cohen, For The Inquirer
ROME - It is still hot in Rome this time of year. That doesn't mean you shouldn't go. In fact, a little sweat seems a small price to pay for the chance, at almost every corner, to duck into a church where you can sit in the shade and stare at a lustrous virgin by Raphael or a strenuously ardent saint by Caravaggio. Still, on a recent trip to the Eternal City we happened to lodge in the ancient Trastevere section, and on one particularly sweltering day, not wishing to walk too far, we crossed the Tiber River to explore the nearby neighborhood, Rome's former Jewish ghetto.
NEWS
December 10, 1986 | By GLORIA CAMPISI and JOE CLARK, Daily News Staff Writers
A Philadelphia priest soon will go to Rome intent on building bridges of understanding between American Catholics and the Vatican. Pope John Paul II announced yesterday that Msgr. Joseph A. Galante, vicar for religious in the Philadelphia Archdiocese, has been named undersecretary to the Congregation for Religious and Secular Institutes, a body of prelates who make policy on a worldwide basis. Galante, 48, said last night he saw his new role as "trying to build bridges - particularly of mutual understanding - to help the Congregation for Religious to understand the American experience and mentality.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
June 30, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, STAFF WRITER
Center City's Blank Rome said Tuesday that four lawyers and additional staff from the Los Angeles family-law firm of Phillips Lerner will join the firm effective Friday, adding to its matrimonial and family-law group. The lawyers are Stacy Phillips, Marc Lerner, Kevin Martin, and Pauline Martin. The group provides legal advice in matters such as divorce, custody, paternity, domestic partnerships, and dealing with domestic violence. In addition to her legal practice, Phillips is the author of Divorce: It's All About Control – How to Win the Emotional, Psychological and Legal Wars . cmondics@phillynews.com 215-854-5957 @cmondics
TRAVEL
June 27, 2016
Here are the 10 favorite Rome museums of Alan Phipps Darr, the senior curator of the European Art Department and Walter B. Ford II Family Curator of European Sculpture and Decorative Arts at the Detroit Institute of Arts. He has been to Rome many times. You may not have time to see every one, but try to duck into at least a couple to see the embarrassment of artistic riches that is Rome. Domus Aurea. Nero's "Golden House" near the Colosseum features amazing frescoes but has been closed many times in the past few years because of renovations.
TRAVEL
June 27, 2016
Security: High security is obvious at major tourist locations, but especially at the Pantheon area, Trevi Fountain, train station, and outside the walls of Vatican City. I observed uniformed military officers with automatic weapons standing by as crowds thronged, part of an antiterrorism effort, Operation Safe Streets. Regular police were obvious as well, but they mainly were doing normal duties such as shooing away motorbikes and stopping people from climbing into the fountains.
TRAVEL
May 23, 2016
Q: I have been attempting to get reimbursed for out­of­pocket expenses from Alitalia, and I'm hoping you can help. The problem started when Alitalia checked me in as the wrong passenger on a flight from Miami to Rome to Tel Aviv. There was another E. Weiner on the flight. I discovered the problem while waiting to board the flight in Miami. My ticket was supposed to be from Miami to Tel Aviv via Rome. My boarding pass was only to Rome. While the staff scrambled to correct the problem ticket and boarding pass, they said they would board the plane and find my bags.
SPORTS
April 6, 2016 | Mike Jensen, STAFF WRITER
HOUSTON - Naturally, Villanova senior Mike Manta was not going to miss Saturday's NCAA semifinal game. Manta watched the whole glorious thing - in Rome. Standing outside NRG Stadium about four hours before Monday's NCAA title game, Manta, from Downingtown, was explaining the logistics that took him from a hotel room in the Eternal City to a shady spot outside a football stadium in Houston. "It's all blurring together," Manta said, figuring he'd gotten maybe six hours of sleep the previous two days.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
It was a dash to the finish. The deal to combine Washington's Dickstein Shapiro with Center City-based Blank Rome was hatched on Christmas Eve and became a 45-day sprint as partners at both firms raced to close the transaction. Talks began at a lunch on Dec. 24 between Blank Rome chief operating officer Patrick Cavanaugh and Dickstein chairman James Kelly. Cavanaugh had reached out to Kelly after word began circulating that Dickstein's planned merger with St. Louis-based Bryan Cave had foundered over terms of the transaction.
BUSINESS
January 28, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
Blank Rome, a Center City-based law firm with 550 lawyers, is reportedly in merger talks with Washington-based Dickstein Shapiro, and a deal could be announced within weeks. A national firm with a substantial regulatory practice in Washington, Dickstein has been plagued in recent years by partner defections. It once had as many as 500 lawyers, but has now dwindled to about 150. Blank Rome declined to comment on the merger talks, first reported by Bloomberg News, but a person familiar with the situation said that no final decision had been reached and that the talks could break off without an agreement.
TRAVEL
January 4, 2016 | By Paul F. Bradley, For The Inquirer
As the old saying goes, "A thousand roads lead men forever to Rome. " Those same roads can lead travelers away from the Eternal City toward off-the-beaten-path activities. One recent excursion led us from the crowds, ruins, and basilicas of Rome to the bucolic peace of Tuscany. We had arranged to join a hunt for the coveted trifola d'Alba Madonna - the white truffle. The most precious specimen can sell for $1,000 per ounce; a casino magnate once paid $330,000 for a single 3.3-pound white truffle.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|