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Romeo And Juliet

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2013 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Director Krista Apple undertook no easy task in her lesbian version of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet now being presented by Curio Theatre Company. Unlike Joe Calarco's Shakespeare's R&J , which rewrote the plot to introduce budding homosexual affections between students at an all-boys school, Apple changed little. Romeo is a woman, Juliet falls in love with her, both suffer from the war between their families. The problems here don't lie in the performances. Rachel Gluck delivers a lovable Romeo, her throaty voice and aggressive mannerisms a nice foil to Isa St. Clair's lovely portrayal of innocence.
NEWS
July 2, 1991 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Shakespeare in the Park production of Romeo and Juliet demonstrates the influence that the Pastorius Park setting can have on a production. The plays are staged near the stone-wall-enclosed waterway that runs through the Chestnut Hill park. The playing space is framed by two stone bridges, with the audience seated on the hill that slopes up from one side of the waterway. Last summer, the troupe staged The Tempest, and made full use of the playing area by staging the action on both sides of the stream.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1990 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
"Romeo is in our blood," said a Romania-born friend of Marin Boieru, who was also born there, during an intermission of Romeo and Juliet Wednesday night at the Academy of Music. Wherever Boieru's passion came from, he turned the Pennsylvania Ballet's premiere of John Cranko's three-act ballet into a triumph. It's rare that one dancer can galvanize a production as big, multifaceted, and sometimes cumbersome as this Romeo and Juliet, but Boieru did it. From the first, he was a man in love.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1989 | By Steve Friedman, Special to the Daily News
Anoble, long-suffering heroine, forced to make the ultimate sacrifice for the man she loves. A mysterious stranger in a decidedly strange land, searching for a second chance. Two fierce, proud families, locked in an age- old blood feud . . . With dramatic ingredients like these, how can "Winter People" possibly miss? The answer is, sadly: by a country mile. Director Ted Kotcheff, whose "First Blood" (the original Rambo movie) amply demonstrated his grasp for the look and feel of small-town America, has come up with a different breed of soft-spoken stranger in "Winter People.
NEWS
June 8, 1990 | SUSAN WINTERS/ DAILY NEWS
The Pennsylvania Ballet tiptoed onto the stage of the Academy of Music last night with its interpretation of "Romeo and Juliet," William Shakespeare's eternal tale of tragedy and young love. The John Cranko production, coupled with the music of Prokofiev, runs through June 13.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1996 | By Bing J. Mark, FOR THE INQUIRER
Romeo and Juliet, as a ballet, offers a precise challenge to the director and the dancers: They must bring immediacy and emotional nuance to a very familiar story. For the Pennsylvania Ballet, which is performing John Cranko's 1962 choreography to Sergei Prokofiev's 1940 score, the challenge is to draw on the company's neoclassical base and sensitivity to music as a means of giving the audience what they really desire - more romance. The Ballet's Romeo and Juliet, at the Academy of Music through June 16th, runs nearly three hours and has good scenery, but is disappointing.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2005 | By Lisa Kraus FOR THE INQUIRER
The Pennsylvania Ballet is presenting Romeo and Juliet in a sumptuous production that finds the drama of the story while bringing off with elan the assortment of festive and stately dances, character pieces, and pas de deux that choreographer John Cranko devised for Shakespeare's tale of feuding families and star-crossed young love. The production also features a Romeo and Juliet, Zachary Hench and Julie Diana, who are a real-life couple, a pairing that lends immediacy and depth to their performances.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1990 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
If Shakespeare hadn't imagined a Romeo and a Juliet, a choreographer surely would have. The young couple's headlong rush into doomed love speaks not only to the energy of dance, but to its poignant ephemerality as well. As do all the great librettos of romantic ballet, Shakespeare's play describes a love too passionate for earthly life. It ends at a portal to the afterlife, a tombstone. The natural affinity between the play and dance is borne out with remarkable amplitude in a survey the American Ballet Theater once made of choreographed Romeo and Juliets: The company found that no fewer than 95 choreographers had tackled the play between 1926 and 1986.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1999 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Long before the current Bard boom, Shakespeare was supplying writers with ideas, and few were more profitable than the transformation of Romeo and Juliet into Tony and Maria in West Side Story. Released in 1961 - four years after Leonard Bernstein's breakthrough musical's Broadway bow - Robert Wise's lavish screen version won a slew of Oscars. It wears its years well, chiefly because of the indelible score. Expect to be stunned by Natalie Wood's singing. (It was dubbed by that peerless ghost-singer Marni Nixon.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
At its core, Romeo and Juliet , currently receiving a conceptually odd but effective treatment by Philadelphia Shakespeare Theatre, is all about the irresistible-force paradox: What happens when such a force meets an immovable object? If the force is teenage hormones and the object entrenched parents, the result, as observed by every English-speaking generation since 1597, is guaranteed to be messy. But this Romeo and Juliet , messy in almost all the wrong ways, somehow gets its young lovers and their terrifying frenzies just right.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 2015 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Teenage angst and parental control. Love at first sight and deep-seated enmity. Quintessence Theatre Group's superbly acted production of Romeo and Juliet magnifies the power of Shakespeare's plot while exemplifying everything that excites and aggravates about this company as it enters its sixth season. First, the acting: Emiley Kiser's Juliet looks like a 13-year-old and acts like one. Her long hair is tousled into braids, and her every line bursts with the hyperbole of youth, adorably without being annoying.
NEWS
June 15, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
'This show has never been seen before and will never be seen again. " That is how Bobbi Block, founder of the improv company Tongue & Groove, introduces Unspoken , a 75-minute show that will be created before our eyes and will be based on audience submissions: every show is a one of a kind. She is joined onstage by the talented troupe, all improv veterans, many of whom have surprising day jobs: Beth Dougherty, Noah Herman, Ed Miller, Fred Siegel, and Carrie Spaulding. Slightly offstage is Carol Moog, whose harmonica both accompanies the scenes and lets the performers know when a scene has come to its natural conclusion or has worn out its welcome.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
At its core, Romeo and Juliet , currently receiving a conceptually odd but effective treatment by Philadelphia Shakespeare Theatre, is all about the irresistible-force paradox: What happens when such a force meets an immovable object? If the force is teenage hormones and the object entrenched parents, the result, as observed by every English-speaking generation since 1597, is guaranteed to be messy. But this Romeo and Juliet , messy in almost all the wrong ways, somehow gets its young lovers and their terrifying frenzies just right.
NEWS
February 21, 2014
WE'RE pretty sure your local pharmacy doesn't carry a card for a 450th birthday, but that doesn't mean you can't help William Shakespeare celebrate that milestone this year. Last month, the Free Library of Philadelphia began a major, yearlong observance of the Bard of Avon that will feature a multidimensional series of programs. Not surprisingly, at the center of the celebration is Ol' Will's theatrical legacy. "Ninety percent of the programs are related to his plays," said Sandy Horrocks, the library's vice president of external affairs.
NEWS
February 17, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
EDISON HIGH SCHOOL senior Kiara Gil-Jimenez had no problem performing a scene from "Romeo and Juliet" in English class - despite the tricky dialogue spoken by Lord Capulet when he learns that his daughter doesn't want to marry Paris. "Thank me no thankings nor proud me no prouds, "But fettle your fine joints 'gainst Thursday next," Gil-Jimenez recited from the play during a recent class. Gil-Jimenez and her senior classmates are taking part in the "Romeo and Juliet Project," a 12-day residency hosted by Philadelphia Young Playwrights and the Philadelphia Shakespeare Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2013 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Director Krista Apple undertook no easy task in her lesbian version of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet now being presented by Curio Theatre Company. Unlike Joe Calarco's Shakespeare's R&J , which rewrote the plot to introduce budding homosexual affections between students at an all-boys school, Apple changed little. Romeo is a woman, Juliet falls in love with her, both suffer from the war between their families. The problems here don't lie in the performances. Rachel Gluck delivers a lovable Romeo, her throaty voice and aggressive mannerisms a nice foil to Isa St. Clair's lovely portrayal of innocence.
NEWS
April 11, 2013
Milo O'Shea, 86, a versatile Dublin-born stage and screen actor known for his famously bristling, agile eyebrows and roles in such disparate films as Ulysses , Barbarella , and Franco Zeffirelli's Romeo and Juliet, died Tuesday, April 2, in New York after a short illness, according to Irish news accounts. Familiar both in starring and supporting roles, Mr. O'Shea, who also appeared in many popular television series, including Cheers, Frasier, The West Wing, and The Golden Girls.
SPORTS
February 15, 2013 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
SOMETIMES ADS hit too close to home. A case in point is a Nike ad featuring Oscar Pistorius, the double-amputee sprinter better known as "Blade Runner because of his prosthetic legs. He was charged with murder on Thursday after allegedly shooting his girlfriend, Reeva Steenkamp, to death. Prior to the incident, Nike had an ad on Pistorius' website featuring a series of photos of the runner in freeze-frame motion. In retrospect, the words that accompanied it are chilling: "I AM THE BULLET IN THE CHAMBER" Nike promptly pulled the ad.   Wherefore art thou?
NEWS
October 7, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - Meryl Streep has donated $1 million to the Public Theater in honor of both its late founder, Joseph Papp, and her friend Nora Ephron. Streep has performed for the Public for decades, starting in 1975 and including "Henry V" in 1976 and "Mother Courage and Her Children" in 2006. This summer, she played Juliet opposite Kevin Kline as Romeo in a benefit reading of "Romeo and Juliet" in Central Park. Ephron, who died in June, directed Streep in her portrayal of chef Julia Child in 2009's "Julie & Julia.
NEWS
May 5, 2012 | By Merilyn Jackson, FOR THE INQUIRER
In J.M. Barrie's Peter Pan, the boy was dressed in leaves, as perhaps was Pan, the Greek god of nature whom Barrie had in mind. When Pennsylvania Ballet gave the ballet Peter Pan its Philadelphia premiere Thursday night at the Academy of Music with Alexander Peters as the boy from Neverland, his sprightly body was not clad in leaves, but scantily enough in shorts and straps around his chest to suggest a ruffian from the wilds. The Oregon Ballet originally commissioned choreographer Trey McIntyre to create this Peter Pan, his first full-length ballet, but funding problems caused him to set the work on the Houston Ballet in 2002.
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