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Romeo And Juliet

NEWS
July 27, 2010 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sexy, passionate Romeo and Juliet that opened last weekend at the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival is just what R&J should be: a mix of potent chemistry between the two teens that rips through a starry-eyed first half and a star-crossed second. It's directed with a command of both the characters and the language by Rick Sordelet, who also happens to be the busiest fight choreographer on Broadway; this season, he's directed the brawling in the revival of Fences and the new musical The Addams Family . Sordelet also provides a historic link to this production: He did the fight scenes for Romeo and Juliet at the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival, on the campus of DeSales University near Quakertown, in 1992 - its inaugural season.
NEWS
April 22, 1991 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
The Pennsylvania Ballet's season for 1991-92 will feature two world premieres by artistic director Christopher d'Amboise and the return, after a two-year absence, of John Cranko's popular Romeo and Juliet. In an effort to trim costs, only five programs of repertory will be offered, as compared with this year's seven-program format. The company will also present its annual Christmastime run of The Nutcracker, from Dec. 13 to 31, at the Academy of Music. The season opens at the Shubert Theater on Oct. 9, for a week, with the first of d'Amboise's premieres, a ballet based on ancient myth.
NEWS
April 22, 2010 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
"For never was a story of more woe / Than this of Juliet and her Romeo. " In more ways than one. Woe, that is. This production of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, a joint venture of the Acting Company and the Guthrie Theater, has been touring since early January, and Philadelphia's Annenberg Center is the 26th and final stop. It must be murder to keep up a schedule like that - a few days here, a few days there - so maybe that's why this production is so lifeless. Or maybe it's so flat because the acting is so broad and illustrative, and nearly every rhyme is punched: There is hardly a moment when you feel these are human beings, feeling intense emotions, speaking from their hearts and minds.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2000 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Romeo and Juliet. Pelleas and Melisande. Samson and Dalila. Donald and Margarita? Well, yes. The Philadelphia Orchestra Monday night not only took note of celebrated couples in the musical repertoire, but also revealed the love story of one of its own - Donald Montanaro, its associate principal clarinetist, and Margarita Csonka Montanaro, coprincipal harpist. At the orchestra's Valentine's Day concert, Donald, looking slightly embarrassed, told the audience how the two had met in the orchestra more than 35 years ago, protesting slightly that the story was "not very interesting.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2005 | By TOM Di NARDO For the Daily News
Does art imitate life, or life imitate art? You couldn't tell this weekend at the Academy of Music, during the final Pennsylvania Ballet performances of Prokofiev's masterpiece "Romeo and Juliet. " After everyone took their bows after Saturday afternoon's performance, the curtain rose again on principal dancers Julie Diana and Zachary Hench. Hench, on bended knee, offered an engagement ring to the astonished Diana. No one seems to have known about Hench's plans except Diana's parents, here visiting from San Francisco.
LIVING
March 7, 2000 | By Elizabeth Zimmer, FOR THE INQUIRER
Major life changes, even happy ones, create enormous stress. So it's no wonder that, by the third act of the Pennsylvania Ballet's current production of John Cranko's Romeo and Juliet, playing through Sunday at the Academy of Music, Juliet Capulet is a wreck. In barely three days, the luminous 14-year-old (danced with great charm and seriousness by Leslie Carothers Saturday evening) has met her intended husband, jilted him by falling hard for the equally lovestruck scion of an enemy clan, married the outlaw in secret, and then, on their clandestine wedding night, discovered that he has killed her mother's favorite nephew.
NEWS
July 28, 1988 | Daily News Wire Services
"Moonlighting's" Allyce Beasley is taking to the L.A. stage in an innovative new production of "Romeo and Juliet. " Beasley, who started rehearsals this week, reports she was able to take on the L.A. Ensemble Theater project because the protracted writers' strike has delayed production of "Moonlighting. " "It'll take four to six weeks to gear up the series even after the strike's over, so I'm pretty sure I'll at least be able to open the play on Sept. 1," she says. "Then I'm hoping to do the play on weekends around my 'Moonlighting' schedule - if my energy holds out. " NBC News has announced it will launch its 30-second newscasts on the hour, to be called "NBC News at This Hour" on Monday, Aug. 1. The newsbreaks run from 10 a.m. through 3 p.m. on weekdays.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2008 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
"I don't like conceptual shows," playwright Joe Calarco says of his high-concept, all-male adaptation Shakespeare's R&J. Mauckingbird Theatre's production of Calarco's script is the Philadelphia premiere of a play that had long, successful runs in New York and London (not to mention Japan and Australia). Currently in previews, it opens Wednesday at the Adrienne. Mauckingbird, which is dedicated to re-viewing classic drama through a gay lens, debuted in January with an all-male production of The Misanthrope, a surprisingly persuasive, as well as entertaining, take on the classic Moliere comedy.
NEWS
March 18, 2008 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Romeo (we're talking the real Romeo - balcony, Verona, love-lamed and all) says his spirit "lifts me above the ground with cheerful thoughts," does he really need to leap as he says the words lifts me? And what about Juliet's dad? Sure, he's exasperated because his daughter refuses to accept the marriage he's arranged to the noble but passionless Paris - wouldn't you be, if you'd gone to all that trouble? She'd better be in church for the nuptials, he commands, as Juliet sobs at his feet, or "I will drag thee on a hurdle thither.
NEWS
July 14, 1992 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
For about half its length, the Romeo and Juliet that director Russell Treyz has laid on the stage of the Labuda Center for the Performing Arts works uncommonly well. In the remaining half, however, Treyz is done in by the unevenness of his cast and, perhaps, his own reluctance to push his ideas as far as they're prepared to go. You don't have to read his program note for the production, the second of two in the inaugural season of the Pennsylvania Shakespeare Festival, to recognize that Treyz sees Romeo as a kind of cautionary tale for the young.
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