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Roof Deck

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REAL_ESTATE
September 22, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
The most pleasant feature of Shawn and Lauren League's roof deck is the constant breeze - even on the most sweltering summer-in-the-city days. After visiting the roof deck of some Point Breeze neighbors at 15th and Dickinson Streets, the Leagues liked the idea so much, they took out a home-improvement loan to put in one of their own. "We moved to the city from Bucks County and missed having a yard," Shawn League said. "Yes, the roof deck improved the value of the house, but also our quality of life.
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
THIS IS A "BUYER BEWARE" story that sounds made-up. I mean, who'd believe that buying a new house would lead to robbery and extortion? Yet there was Jordan Hyatt, driving through the city in the dead of night, taking text-message instructions from a contractor who'd robbed Hyatt and his wife. He'd return their stuff if they paid him $300. "It was surreal," says Hyatt, 34, a senior researcher in Penn's criminology department. Hyatt and his wife, Lindsay Wilde, 33, a physician, bought their just-built house in March 2012.
REAL_ESTATE
April 20, 1997 | By Sheila Dyan, FOR THE INQUIRER
Abbotts Square, Head House Square, Philadelphia At the center of historic Philadelphia, just off quirky South Street and bustling Penn's Landing, Head House Square is a great place to visit - and many find it exciting to live there. Abbotts Square is right in the middle of it all. At the corner of Second and South Streets, it is a mixed-use complex with rental and condominium flats, bilevels and townhouses, as well as commercial space. "We moved to Abbotts Square because of its location," Meg Nolan, 30, said.
REAL_ESTATE
October 11, 1991 | By Sheila Dyan, Special to The Inquirer
THE COBBLESTONES AT CHESTNUT HILL Chestnut Hill section of Philadelphia Phone: 215-242-0333 Robin Karman, president of Mid-Atlantic Sales & Marketing Inc., said that although the location was ideal - the area has the lowest car-insurance rates in Philadelphia, is among the safest city neighborhoods, and is within walking distance of two train stations and a shopping center - there were other reasons that 26 homes already had been...
NEWS
August 15, 2003 | By Sheila Dyan FOR THE INQUIRER
With its mix of Victorian and contemporary architecture, old-world charm, New Age restaurants, and timeless elegance, Rittenhouse Square offers a variety of lifestyles for a diversity of residents. The Rittenhouse Claridge, built in 1950, was one of the first buildings to rise on the square after World War II, and it enjoys a historical significance all its own. All very Fifties are the building's linear exterior and softly rounded interior detailing, including a floor-to-ceiling free-form sculpture/planter that is the centerpiece of the marble-floored lobby.
NEWS
July 5, 2004 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Just a few blocks from where thousands gathered to watch yesterday's parade and fireworks, a fire broke out on a roof deck in the Fairmount section of Philadelphia, damaging seven houses. No one was injured in the fire, which started about 6:15 p.m. while neighbors were having an outdoor block party in the 2400 block of Perot Street, a road so narrow that fire trucks could not fit down it. Firefighters had to feed the hoses down the block from the streets bordering both ends. Four rowhouses in the 2400 block of Perot were affected, as were three houses behind them on Meredith Street, Battalion Chief George Griffin said.
NEWS
July 16, 1999 | by Theresa Conroy , Daily News Staff Writer
"This summer I'm gonna. . .. " Ha! Too late. Summer's almost halfway over, which means you have that much less time to attack all those home-improvement, self-improvement, life-enchancing projects you had your warm-weather heart set on. If you've been fooled into believing there's still plenty of summertime left, wake up. According to the planets, we won't be halfway into summer until the second week of August. In real life, however, we take our seasonal cues from popular culture, not astronomy.
NEWS
March 24, 1986 | By Kathy Boccella, Special to The Inquirer
Upper Merion School District officials have proposed a program in which students from the local vocational-technical school would restore a dilapidated boathouse recently acquired by the district. According to the plan, the school district would supply materials and the Montgomery County Area Vocational Technical School would provide the labor, drawing workers from its masonry and carpentry classes. The students, in return, would receive credit for the class project. Phillip Mowry, director of operational services, recommended the plan to the school board during a work session Wednesday night.
NEWS
April 28, 1993 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Maybe they dote on the city's waddling, toddling pigeons. Maybe they find sport in soaring to the skyscrapers above Billy Penn's hat. Whatever the reason, a pair of rare peregrine falcons that dipped and dived over Center City last summer have decided to stay. "They're flying the skies every day," said Dan Brauning, the Pennsylvania Game Commission biologist who has aided and abetted other falcon couples that nested on bridges over the city's rivers. This time, at least one - and possibly two - pair of peregrines have moved right into Center City.
REAL_ESTATE
October 14, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Q uestion: My problem is foil paper on drywall. The paper is on very tight and is impossible to remove. In a column a long time ago, you mentioned a product by Zinsser called Shieldz. Do you think that would work? I have a powder room and small bathroom with the problem. I know I could drywall the rooms, but hope it won't be necessary. Answer: Manufactured now by Rust-o-leum, Shieldz is a primer you apply to walls to make hanging wallpaper easier. It has nothing to do with removing foil paper, or any wallpaper for that matter.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 24, 2015
MARY C. TRACY, executive director of Scenic Philadelphia and president of Scenic America, is a thorn in the side of the billboard industry. Her activism started 25 years ago, when, as a stay-at-home mother, the former public-school teacher rallied her neighbors to fight an illegal billboard in Overbrook Farms. "I really believe that residents and visitors should be treated as citizens, and not as consumers," she said yesterday afternoon, before going up to her Washington Square roof deck to take in a view of the city she loves.
NEWS
March 20, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
THIS IS A "BUYER BEWARE" story that sounds made-up. I mean, who'd believe that buying a new house would lead to robbery and extortion? Yet there was Jordan Hyatt, driving through the city in the dead of night, taking text-message instructions from a contractor who'd robbed Hyatt and his wife. He'd return their stuff if they paid him $300. "It was surreal," says Hyatt, 34, a senior researcher in Penn's criminology department. Hyatt and his wife, Lindsay Wilde, 33, a physician, bought their just-built house in March 2012.
REAL_ESTATE
November 16, 2014 | By Sally A. Downey, For The Inquirer
Lori and Donald Krain have a panoramic view from their roof deck, four stories up. To the east, William Penn peeks between the skyscrapers. To the west, the Cira Centre looms over University City. A church steeple rises amid rooftops to the south. Looking north, tall buildings obscure the Art Museum, but the Krains can still see the July 4 fireworks. The holiday provided an excuse for a party this year, and a deadline to furnish the deck of their new townhouse. Lori potted petunias and ordered a wrought-iron table, mesh chairs, and a cushioned couch made of ipe, a hardy Brazilian wood.
REAL_ESTATE
September 22, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
The most pleasant feature of Shawn and Lauren League's roof deck is the constant breeze - even on the most sweltering summer-in-the-city days. After visiting the roof deck of some Point Breeze neighbors at 15th and Dickinson Streets, the Leagues liked the idea so much, they took out a home-improvement loan to put in one of their own. "We moved to the city from Bucks County and missed having a yard," Shawn League said. "Yes, the roof deck improved the value of the house, but also our quality of life.
REAL_ESTATE
July 20, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Roofmeadow founder Charlie Miller and head of operations Melissa Muroff are designing, promoting, and maintaining green roofs all across the Philadelphia area - the 13,000-square-foot green roof at the Barnes Museum, another atop the Granary building in Fairmount. Lately, they've been busy. The Philadelphia Water Department is charged with ensuring compliance with the federal Clean Water Act. PWD developed a "Green City, Clean Waters" program to use so-called green infrastructure to deal with wastewater, instead of underground pipes.
REAL_ESTATE
October 14, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Q uestion: My problem is foil paper on drywall. The paper is on very tight and is impossible to remove. In a column a long time ago, you mentioned a product by Zinsser called Shieldz. Do you think that would work? I have a powder room and small bathroom with the problem. I know I could drywall the rooms, but hope it won't be necessary. Answer: Manufactured now by Rust-o-leum, Shieldz is a primer you apply to walls to make hanging wallpaper easier. It has nothing to do with removing foil paper, or any wallpaper for that matter.
NEWS
September 30, 2009 | By Melissa Dribben INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For years, Margaret Szumski suffered deck envy. The 57-year-old real estate agent would visit city houses with her clients and see all these great patios crowning buildings and then come home and tell her boyfriend, John Ciccone, that she wanted one, too. A grown-up's treehouse where the air was fresh and sweet, and she could let all her cares drift into space when this old world started getting her down. Carole King understood. Ciccone didn't. "Forget it," he would say. "I've seen deck after deck after deck, and not a single person is ever on them.
NEWS
October 26, 2007 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Recently, however, some companies have begun selling specially designed programmable thermostats for heat pumps, which make setting back the thermostat cost-effective. These thermostats typically use special algorithms to minimize the use of backup electric-resistance heat systems. They are probably very expensive, and if they've just come out, they probably aren't ready for prime time. So I'd accept no as the answer for the present, and have your daughter keep her eye open to any change a year or so down the road.
LIVING
September 28, 2007 | By Alan J. Heavens INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: You keep talking about curb appeal as a way of getting people to look at a house for sale, but I don't really understand what you have to do to obtain curb appeal? How does it work? Answer: The National Association of Realtors said in the past - and I think it probably is even more necessary in this market, with so many more houses for sale - that 49 percent of all successful sales began when the prospective buyer pulled up in front of a house to admire it, and then was intrigued enough by what he or she saw to walk through the front door and see more.
LIVING
March 16, 2007 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Once it was a grand place to see and be seen, a Victorian garden and promenade that hugged the Schuylkill, encircled the Water Works, and meandered up a hill with soaring views of Philadelphia and beyond. But the South Garden and Cliffside Paths, so magnificent in the 19th century, came undone in the 20th. First came the closing of the Water Works, followed by a gradual decline in visitors, and finally, for decades after, the neglect by a city. Now, this historic landmark - often cited as the inspiration for Fairmount Park - blooms again.
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