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Rookie Cop

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NEWS
January 9, 1987 | By JOE O'DOWD, Daily News Staff Writer
A first-year Philadelphia policeman was charged yesterday with raping a 14- year-old girl while off duty. Police said Rodney Walker, 34, of 28th Street near Clearfield, surrendered about 1:30 p.m. to the Sex-Crimes Unit. In addition to rape, he was charged with involuntary deviate sexual intercourse, simple and indecent assault, indecent exposure, corruption of a minor and official oppression. He was suspended for 30 days with intent to dismiss, police said. Police said Walker completed his 3-11 p.m. shift on foot patrol in Center City on Dec. 30 and was driving his own car near Broad and Parrish streets when he saw the girl standing on a corner.
NEWS
June 29, 1994 | by Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writer
A rookie police officer was charged yesterday with raping a woman in his patrol car in North Philadelphia. The officer, Kevin Powell, allegedly stopped the woman as she was walking at 29th and York streets in the early hours of May 10, according to Police Commissioner Richard Neal. The woman told investigators that Powell ordered her into his patrol car and drove her to 34th and Huntingdon streets, at Fairmount Park. The officer allegedly raped her there, before letting her out of his car. Powell, 37, was charged with rape, involuntary deviate sexual intercourse, false imprisonment and related charges.
NEWS
March 4, 1992 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
It took a jury less than an hour yesterday to convict Edward Bracy of first-degree murder in the killing last year of Police Officer Daniel Boyle. The jury will be asked at a sentencing hearing today to sentence Bracy, 30, to death. The panel didn't buy Bracy's contention that he was shooting at the officer's car and didn't mean to hit Boyle on Feb. 4, 1991, after the rookie cop chased the stolen car Bracy was driving for speeding. "I'm gratified that the jury saw it the way the evidence was," said Assistant District Attorney Judith Frankel Rubino.
NEWS
February 4, 1991 | By Kurt Heine, Daily News Staff Writer
A 21-year-old rookie policeman was shot and critically wounded in North Philadelphia this morning after he stopped a stolen car carrying three men, police said. One of the three opened fire with an automatic weapon and shot the officer in the right side of the head, police said. The officer, who wasn't identified, was in critical condition in Temple University Hospital. Police said the officer pulled over a black Buick Riviera about 2:40 a.m. at Germantown Avenue and 8th Street.
NEWS
April 20, 1990 | By Bill Miller, Inquirer Staff Writer
Few rookies join the Philadelphia Police Department with as much fanfare as did John Harkins - one of the brainiest cops to come out of the Police Academy, a top-flight drill leader and an expert marksman, too. Officer Perfect . . . er, Harkins . . . was sworn in to duty on Monday after winning ovations as the valedictorian of his 66-member class and as one of two recruits who scored an error-free 100 at the firing range. Yesterday, Harkins, 26, completed his third day of learning the ropes in his first assignment in the 18th Police District in West Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 6, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
OFFICERS Josh Daniels and Arne Vaughn were pounding the pavement on Frankford Avenue, nodding and talking with passers-by, when a kid toting an iced coffee bigger than his forearm walked right up to them. "It's free-coffee day," he proudly told the officers, before running to catch up with his friends. Later encounters were less benign: A woman fearing for her safety at home; a group of high schoolers reeling from a violent robbery. The interactions had one thing in common: Panicked people had sought out the two officers - and had gone away considerably more calm.
NEWS
September 11, 1990 | By Kathy Brennan and Darryl Lynette Figueroa, Daily News Staff Writers
A rookie police officer accused of leading a group of his friends in an attack on an off-duty fire lieutenant he mistook for another man was suspended yesterday with intent to dismiss, police said. James O'Donnell, 23, who graduated from the Police Academy in late May, led the Aug. 25 attack in revenge for having been cut off in traffic earlier in the day, according to a 15-day investigation concluded yesterday by the Police Department's Internal Affairs Unit. Police Commissioner Willie Williams issued a statement saying O'Donnell was informed yesterday he was suspended without pay for 30 days and would be dismissed.
NEWS
December 5, 1994 | by Joanne Sills, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Jim Nicholson contributed to this report
Rookie police officer Joseph Friel was on the verge of pulling together all he was striving for - a job he loved, a house, a marriage - when, police say, a car driven by a drunken driver ended it all early yesterday morning. His Port Richmond neighbors were grieving yesterday. "The whole neighborhood is devastated by it," said Marge Cleary, who said she knew Friel, 25, from when he was a baby. Cleary called Friel a good kid who would help her carry her groceries. She said he joined the police force with his younger brother, Robert, who worked in the 19th District.
NEWS
January 20, 1995 | by Kurt Heine, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia Police Officer Joseph Friel's seat belt disengaged when a drunk plowed into his police cruiser last month, allowing the rookie cop to be partially flung out the car window to his death, an accident investigator said yesterday. Friel, 25, was patrolling Roxborough in one of the city's latest police cars - a 1994 Ford with less than 12,000 miles on it. But neither airbag nor seat belt nor modern car construction could save the officer from the collision with an 11-year-old Monte Carlo, whose driver survived the crash unscratched.
NEWS
September 11, 1999 | by Barbara Laker, Daily News Staff Writer
The word "Badlands" is tattooed in black letters in a line down the skinny young man's arm. This man, who claims to be 24 but looked 17, pulled up his shirt, stretched out his hand and beamed with pride. "That's where we grew up. Once you're from it, you have it. " He sat with his friends yesterday afternoon on concrete steps facing the wall of an abandoned North Philadelphia bar at Clearfield and Percy streets, where the same words were scrawled in big bold letters. "It's the Badlands bar," he chuckled.
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NEWS
October 6, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
OFFICERS Josh Daniels and Arne Vaughn were pounding the pavement on Frankford Avenue, nodding and talking with passers-by, when a kid toting an iced coffee bigger than his forearm walked right up to them. "It's free-coffee day," he proudly told the officers, before running to catch up with his friends. Later encounters were less benign: A woman fearing for her safety at home; a group of high schoolers reeling from a violent robbery. The interactions had one thing in common: Panicked people had sought out the two officers - and had gone away considerably more calm.
NEWS
January 16, 2013 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
ON APRIL 16, 2012, Suhaila Teran Ponce, of Peru, was in the wrong place at the wrong time and almost died because of it. Six months later, the 5-year-old arrived in Philly, a medical mecca that is the right place for her to rebuild her life. But until the Daily News got involved, Suhaila's father, Florentino Teran Vasquez, worried that bad timing, once again, might derail his daughter's future. Her recent past has been hell. On that lovely April afternoon, Florentino, 37, was working at the hotel where he tends bar. Suhaila, her mother, Beatriz, 32, and her other daughter, Diana, 9, were strolling home from Diana's school in Cajamarca, Peru, north of the capital of Lima.
NEWS
April 15, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fresh out of the police academy, six rookie cops are put on foot patrol in the hellzapoppin' neighborhood of Morningside Heights in upper Manhattan. That's the deceptively simple premise of NYC 22, a gritty new CBS series premiering Sunday, created by novelist Richard Price and executive-produced by a quartet that includes Robert De Niro. But these are no ordinary wet-behind-the-cuffs flatfeet. Take Jayson "Jackpot" Toney (Harold House Moore). He's a basketball star who washed out of the NBA for his party ways.
NEWS
December 7, 2011 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, zalotm@phillynews.com 215-854-5928
RICHARD DeCoatsworth, a five-year veteran police officer who was hailed as a hero after being shot in the face by a suspect in 2007 but who more recently drew controversial headlines, left the force last week. DeCoatsworth, whose most recent assignment was with the Marine Unit, took disability retirement from the department after it was determined that injuries from the 2007 shooting prevented him from continuing to do police work, said spokesman Lt. Ray Evers. After he caught the shotgun blast to the face as a rookie cop in 2007, DeCoatsworth was invited to attend a February 2009 presidential speech.
NEWS
May 25, 2010 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Pennsylvania state inmate BB8134 was expecting someone else. From time to time he had a woman visitor at Graterford Prison, and when he ambled into the guests' lounge that morning back in September 2007 and spotted me with my notepad, his look said, who the hell are you? He sat with me anyway, and talked about what it felt like to be charged with murder, 41 years after shooting a cop. William J. Barnes didn't look to me like a danger to society, but that wasn't the reason he was being tried.
NEWS
February 25, 2009 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Richard Decoatsworth, the Philadelphia police officer who was shot in the face during a traffic stop, was rewarded last night for his valor by sitting right next to the first lady during the presidential address. Decoatsworth, wearing his dress blue uniform, and 19 other Americans from across the country were invited to sit in the box reserved for Michelle Obama and Jill Biden, wife of Vice President Biden. Decoatsworth, 23, was a rookie cop in September 2007 when he stopped a car in West Philadelphia and asked four teenage boys to get out. One of them pulled out a sawed-off shotgun and fired at the officer's head as he stood by his cruiser.
NEWS
July 21, 2008 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The painting of the lean-faced, bearded man with the penetrating stare is unmistakably a self-portrait by Vincent van Gogh. An art historian can tell by looking at the riot of bold, colorful brushstrokes. Researchers at Pennsylvania State and Princeton Universities, however, use an analytical tool that surely the troubled Dutch master never imagined: The computer. Their method is far from foolproof, but the two teams, along with a third one in the Netherlands, were able to distinguish dozens of van Gogh's works from those painted by others - including an infamous forgery.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2006 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jeff is an apartment-house doorman, and he may as well be stuck in the door he spends all night guarding. Maybe his life is getting better because at least he has the ruthlessly boring doorman job, having been ejected from the Navy for smoking weed, then losing lots of money on a stupid bet. But mostly, he's stuck, and too smart and glib for his own good, and coated all over with naivete. Or is he just a down-to-earth, honest guy who respects the truth? Kenneth Lonergan's Lobby Hero, in which Jeff is the prime character, is absorbing in a paragon of a production by the Walnut Street Theatre's Independence Studio.
NEWS
March 17, 2000 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The rookie cop who stopped Joe Frazier for driving under the influence, the veteran sergeant who OK'd the pinch, and the officer who gave Smokin' Joe a Breathalyzer test all testified yesterday that the ex-champ had been drunk. Frazier, 56, was acquitted of drunk driving in September 1998, and now he's suing the city for damages. But much of Frazier's case either was knocked out of court yesterday by U.S. District Judge Harvey Bartle III or withdrawn by Frazier's attorney.
NEWS
September 15, 1999 | by Ellen Gray, Daily News Staff Writer
With a month to go before its Oct. 15 premiere, a Fox-TV series about a rookie cop in Philadelphia finally has a new name: "Ryan Caulfield: Year 1. " That's a long way from "The Badland," the title that had gotten Police Commissioner John Timoney's Irish up when he first heard it in July. That's because, even without the final "s," it referred to a nickname he's trying to discourage for the North Philadelphia neighborhood in which the show is set. Kevin Fox, the show's co-creator, said yesterday that it was always the producers' hope to name the show after the lead character, a 19-year-old rookie whose name is a play on J.D. Salinger's "Catcher in the Rye" hero Holden Caulfield.
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