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Room Temperature

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FOOD
October 11, 1989 | By Russ Parsons, Special to The Inquirer
Americans seem to hate gray areas. We like things to be black or white. We like politicians who are either liberal or conservative. We like our wines red or white. And we like our foods hot or cold. And given a choice of foods, nine times out of 10 we'll take it hot. For some eateries, that's their only claim to fame. The sign out front proclaiming "Hot Food!" is a partner to "rib-stickin' " in the American culinary glossary, first kin to "home cooking. " This preoccupation with steaming-hot food is not limited to people who go only to places named "Mom's.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2012
Buzz: Hey, Marnie. We were out to dinner last night and I saw the funniest thing — the guy at the table next to us asked for an ice bucket for their RED wine. What a rube! Marnie: Not exactly, Buzz. I do that myself. Red wines are often served too warm, especially at this time of year. They taste much better with a little chill — brighter and less harsh. I'll ask for an ice bucket in a heartbeat if the wine's too warm. Buzz: Wait, I thought red wines were supposed to be served warm, like whiskey.
FOOD
August 17, 2012 | By Joe Gray, Chicago Tribune
During stone-fruit season, I can't get enough of beautifully ripe apricots, peaches, nectarines, and plums. But peaches are my favorite, so much so that I've taken to playing with their sweet-tart flavor in entrees. In this one, farro, a nutty Italian grain, acted as a base for the peaches, backed up by smoky bacon, fresh peppers, creamy, tangy feta, onions, and peppery arugula.   Summery Grain Salad With Peaches Makes 6 servings 11/2 cups uncooked pearled farro or quinoa 4 to 6 slices bacon 1 red onion, cut in 1/2-inch slices 1/2 teaspoon salt 3 to 4 medium peaches, chopped in 1/2-inch dice 6 ounces feta, crumbled 2 banana or melrose peppers, sliced very thinly crosswise, seeds and pith removed 3 tablespoons olive oil 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 1 bunch arugula, torn into pieces 1. Cook the farro or quinoa according to package directions.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2012 | Jason Wilson
Here are two cool and delicious popsicle recipes you can try at home from Jeanne Chang at Lil Pop Shop in West Philly. For both recipes, if using pop molds with lids that include sticks or will hold sticks, divide the mixture among the molds.  Freeze until solid, about 5 hours.  If using unconventional molds, divide mixture among the molds and freeze for about 90 minutes to 2 hours until pops begin to set, then insert sticks and freeze until solid, about 3 1/2 to 4 hours. If using instant ice pop maker, such as Zoku, follow manufacturer instructions.
FOOD
October 28, 1998 | by Peggy Landers, Daily News Staff Writer
Soup in a box? Trend-spotters, duly note the beginning of a big change in packaging: Aseptic cartons that have an indefinite shelf life. You've used them in kids' juice and milk boxes. Now they've invaded the soup aisle. Kitchen Basics Cooking Stocks is among the first soup manufacturers to use them. The squishy cartons don't require a can opener, and once opened they can be resealed and refrigerated. Musical brunch Wanna little concert with your croissant? Striped Bass owner Neil Stein has included performances by students of the Curtis Institute of Music on the Sunday brunch menu.
NEWS
August 14, 2012
British chemist Martin Fleischmann, 85, who stunned the world by announcing that he had achieved nuclear fusion in a glass bottle, has died after a long illness. His son Nicholas said he died Friday at his home in Tisbury, England. He suffered from Parkinson's disease. Mr. Fleischmann was one of the world's leading electrochemists when he and partner Stanley Pons proclaimed in 1989 that they had sparked fusion, the nuclear process that heats the sun, in an experiment at the University of Utah.
FOOD
August 30, 2012 | By Mario Batali, McCLATCHY-TRIBUNE
I love cheesecake in any form, but this year I am most in love with a cheesecake with a surprise: Nectarine and Black Pepper Cheesecake. Ricotta brings a lightness that is unmatched to the classic New York cheesecake. I add mascarpone and American cream cheese to help balance the ricotta and achieve an ideal creamy texture. Near Modena, in Emilia-Romagna, nectarines are often served with black pepper and balsamic vinegar, a combination so deceptively perfect and balanced that it seemed a logical step to mix that combination with delicious ricotta and cream cheese.
NEWS
November 29, 2012
Taken from a reference in The Magician's Nephew , Easy Nougat is perfect for the holidays, according to author Dinah Bucholz, and makes 3 dozen candies. 4 tablespoons butter, at room temperature 3 cups confectioners' sugar 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract 1/4 cup light corn syrup 1/2 cup marshmallow creme 1/2 cup nonfat milk powder 1 pound bittersweet chocolate, broke into pieces, or chocolate coating pieces 1. Combine all ingredients except the chocolate in a large mixing bowl.
NEWS
November 1, 2013
BONES OF THE DEAD (OSSI DEI MORTI) 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature 1 1/4 cups sugar 1/2 lemon, zested 1 egg white 1 3/4 cups flour 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/2 cup ground almonds 1 teaspoon ground cloves Powdered sugar In medium-sized bowl, beat butter until creamy. Add sugar, lemon zest, egg white and beat until combined. In a separate bowl, whisk: flour, cinnamon, almonds, and cloves. Gradually add the flour mixture to the wet ingredients in the mixing bowl until a ball has formed.
FOOD
December 13, 1989 | By Marilynn Marter, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's something to be said for enjoying a bonanza of fresh summer fruits after trekking through snow and slush and temperatures in the teens to get to the supermarket. Among the best buys to be found in the markets this week are exotic and off-season fruits, many of which come from Chile. It is the first major promotion of Chilean fruits here since two cyanide-laced grapes were found in March and the United States temporarily banned shipments from Chile. The best selection at moderate prices was found at Pathmark, where Chilean Bing cherries, peaches, nectarines, plums and apricots are $1.99 a pound, half the price in some other stores.
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NEWS
November 1, 2013
BONES OF THE DEAD (OSSI DEI MORTI) 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature 1 1/4 cups sugar 1/2 lemon, zested 1 egg white 1 3/4 cups flour 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/2 cup ground almonds 1 teaspoon ground cloves Powdered sugar In medium-sized bowl, beat butter until creamy. Add sugar, lemon zest, egg white and beat until combined. In a separate bowl, whisk: flour, cinnamon, almonds, and cloves. Gradually add the flour mixture to the wet ingredients in the mixing bowl until a ball has formed.
NEWS
November 29, 2012
Taken from a reference in The Magician's Nephew , Easy Nougat is perfect for the holidays, according to author Dinah Bucholz, and makes 3 dozen candies. 4 tablespoons butter, at room temperature 3 cups confectioners' sugar 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract 1/4 cup light corn syrup 1/2 cup marshmallow creme 1/2 cup nonfat milk powder 1 pound bittersweet chocolate, broke into pieces, or chocolate coating pieces 1. Combine all ingredients except the chocolate in a large mixing bowl.
FOOD
August 30, 2012 | By Mario Batali, McCLATCHY-TRIBUNE
I love cheesecake in any form, but this year I am most in love with a cheesecake with a surprise: Nectarine and Black Pepper Cheesecake. Ricotta brings a lightness that is unmatched to the classic New York cheesecake. I add mascarpone and American cream cheese to help balance the ricotta and achieve an ideal creamy texture. Near Modena, in Emilia-Romagna, nectarines are often served with black pepper and balsamic vinegar, a combination so deceptively perfect and balanced that it seemed a logical step to mix that combination with delicious ricotta and cream cheese.
FOOD
August 17, 2012 | By Joe Gray, Chicago Tribune
During stone-fruit season, I can't get enough of beautifully ripe apricots, peaches, nectarines, and plums. But peaches are my favorite, so much so that I've taken to playing with their sweet-tart flavor in entrees. In this one, farro, a nutty Italian grain, acted as a base for the peaches, backed up by smoky bacon, fresh peppers, creamy, tangy feta, onions, and peppery arugula.   Summery Grain Salad With Peaches Makes 6 servings 11/2 cups uncooked pearled farro or quinoa 4 to 6 slices bacon 1 red onion, cut in 1/2-inch slices 1/2 teaspoon salt 3 to 4 medium peaches, chopped in 1/2-inch dice 6 ounces feta, crumbled 2 banana or melrose peppers, sliced very thinly crosswise, seeds and pith removed 3 tablespoons olive oil 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 1 bunch arugula, torn into pieces 1. Cook the farro or quinoa according to package directions.
NEWS
August 14, 2012
British chemist Martin Fleischmann, 85, who stunned the world by announcing that he had achieved nuclear fusion in a glass bottle, has died after a long illness. His son Nicholas said he died Friday at his home in Tisbury, England. He suffered from Parkinson's disease. Mr. Fleischmann was one of the world's leading electrochemists when he and partner Stanley Pons proclaimed in 1989 that they had sparked fusion, the nuclear process that heats the sun, in an experiment at the University of Utah.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2012
Buzz: Hey, Marnie. We were out to dinner last night and I saw the funniest thing — the guy at the table next to us asked for an ice bucket for their RED wine. What a rube! Marnie: Not exactly, Buzz. I do that myself. Red wines are often served too warm, especially at this time of year. They taste much better with a little chill — brighter and less harsh. I'll ask for an ice bucket in a heartbeat if the wine's too warm. Buzz: Wait, I thought red wines were supposed to be served warm, like whiskey.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2012 | Jason Wilson
Here are two cool and delicious popsicle recipes you can try at home from Jeanne Chang at Lil Pop Shop in West Philly. For both recipes, if using pop molds with lids that include sticks or will hold sticks, divide the mixture among the molds.  Freeze until solid, about 5 hours.  If using unconventional molds, divide mixture among the molds and freeze for about 90 minutes to 2 hours until pops begin to set, then insert sticks and freeze until solid, about 3 1/2 to 4 hours. If using instant ice pop maker, such as Zoku, follow manufacturer instructions.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2000 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Who wants to be a millionaire? Most of us, in all likelihood. But not so avidly as the phone jockeys dialing for dollars in Boiler Room, Ben Younger's breathtaking feature debut about the bottom-feeders of the economic boom. For the boiler-room boys, a lower species of humanity than telemarketers, the suckers who play the market are juicy targets to be sucked dry. The guys teasing the touch-tones are more likely to be recruited from the bowling league than the Ivy League, but they are finaglers with finesse.
NEWS
January 19, 2000 | by Lynn Hoffman, For the Daily News
Everybody knows you should serve red wines at room temperature and everybody's wrong. For one thing, room temperature varies widely. Here in America, where fuel is cheap and heat is delivered by a central furnace, we tend to set our thermostats in the low 70s and we expect to be comfortable indoors in short-sleeved shirts. In Europe, heating costs are higher and homes are still likely to be heated by single-room heaters - folks are content to wear sweaters. That small difference in temperature - 5 to 12 degrees - makes a lot of difference to your wine.
FOOD
October 28, 1998 | by Peggy Landers, Daily News Staff Writer
Soup in a box? Trend-spotters, duly note the beginning of a big change in packaging: Aseptic cartons that have an indefinite shelf life. You've used them in kids' juice and milk boxes. Now they've invaded the soup aisle. Kitchen Basics Cooking Stocks is among the first soup manufacturers to use them. The squishy cartons don't require a can opener, and once opened they can be resealed and refrigerated. Musical brunch Wanna little concert with your croissant? Striped Bass owner Neil Stein has included performances by students of the Curtis Institute of Music on the Sunday brunch menu.
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