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ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
The second corn crop is coming in and peaches are practically falling from the sky. There are tomatoes and cucumbers to pick, potatoes and carrots to dig, and for Laura Anne Lapp, it's canning time. "August is the busy season," says Laura, 32, author of a new book called An Amish Garden , a month-by-month chronicle of a full year in her Cumberland County, Pa., garden. Actually, every season is busy for this Old Order Amish wife and mother of three. She not only grows food and puts things up, she also cooks and bakes from scratch, makes clothes, and tends to 18 egg-laying hens and one noisy rooster.
NEWS
January 26, 1988 | By Susan Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wedged among the stone-faced homes of suburban Wynnewood, there is a secret garden where a rooster still rules the barnyard and old-fashioned boxwood frames the perennial beds. This is the Toland family farm, where three generations of Tolands continue to homestead and where, as recently as a decade ago, cows grazed in the open pasture. "Not that many places around here, or anywhere, have stayed the same this long," said Polly Toland, who lives next door to her daughter and her daughter's family in a home that backs onto the four-acre tract.
NEWS
February 5, 1996 | By Tom Infield, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He just turned 82. He has served in Pennsylvania's Senate longer than anyone else in the state's 314-year history. And now he's running for another four-year term. State Sen. Clarence D. Bell, a Republican representing parts of Chester and Delaware Counties, has clearly mastered the art of political survival. The key, he says, is to avoid fights you can't win. In his words: "I've learned not to go around kicking iron dogs with open-toed shoes. " That applies to the big issues such as abortion and school choice - he says he seeks to learn his constituents' wishes, and then votes their way - and it applies to the little things in life.
NEWS
March 8, 1996 | By Peggy Reeves Sanday
On International Women's Day, my thoughts turn to a little girl named Eggy who lives halfway around the world, smack on the equator. Eggy was born in 1988 during one of my anthropological trips to West Sumatra, Indonesia. She was named after me (without the P) soon after I left to return home - a way of keeping me there, her mother explained. Six years later, when Eggy went to school and needed a more formal name, she was renamed Peggi Sandi. I was flattered and honored, glad for the misspelling because it made Eggy both unique yet part of me. Eggy is a member of the Minangkabau ethnic group, among the most populous in Indonesia.
NEWS
February 23, 1987 | By MICHEL MARRIOTT, Daily News Staff Writer
It started about four years ago with a little wooden birdhouse. Today Jesse Sturgis' front yard, near 42nd Street and Lancaster Avenue in West Philadelphia, is a gallery of the gaudy, a place where the cheap and the discarded have found a new home and a new purpose. Either suspended from or set upon more than a dozen spindly poles - many 6 to 8 feet high - Sturgis has assembled a garden of sunflower-shaped windmills, a plastic menagerie of brightly colored birds, a collection of toy cars, a plastic shark, a disembodied plastic hand and a string of home-grown gourds hollowed out and awaiting some urban flock seeking a nest.
NEWS
June 20, 1991 | By Wendy Walker, Special to The Inquirer
A raid at a Chester County mobile home netted six ounces of cocaine and 10 roosters believed to be used in cockfights, according to state police at the Avondale barracks. Evangelina Garcia and Carlos Santos Torres, both 37, were arrested at the home on the east side of Route 796 in the Kelton section of Penn Township at 11:30 a.m. Friday. The pair, charged with possession of a controlled substance, possession with intent to deliver, and conspiracy, were arraigned before District Justice D. Richard Muth in West Chester and were sent to Chester County Prison after failing to post $150,000 cash bail each.
NEWS
February 12, 1993 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Forty-eight cockfighting roosters will lose their lives if their owners do not step forward to claim them within the next 20 days. Vineland Municipal Judge John Kaspar ruled yesterday that the birds were abandoned Saturday night when police raided a cockfight in progress. Kaspar said that animal-welfare officials had the right to euthanize the birds if the owners did not claim them by March 3. Seven men were arrested and 67 others are being issued summonses for betting on fighting cocks in the basement of the rural Vineland residence of Benjamin Cardona, 43. Cardona and the 73 other men were charged with gambling and cruelty to animals, police said.
NEWS
April 1, 1991 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Owners of animals seized by police or the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals are entitled to a hearing before their pets are destroyed, the state Superior Court has ruled. The court said that 23 roosters seized as fighting cocks in 1987 should not have been destroyed for humane purposes until the owner was permitted to challenge "the necessity of the destruction. " Once a pet is destroyed, Judge Frank J. Montemuro said in an opinion handed down last week, filing a civil suit in protest wouldn't mean much to the owner.
NEWS
May 20, 1986 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Special to The Inquirer
Inside the house, a bloodstained fighting pit lay unassembled on the floor. In the basement was an "isolation" room for pre-fight training. There were treadmills, scales, drugs and detailed training and performance reports. Outside, each one chained to a round concrete slab, were 11 pit bull terriers, most with scars on their heads and bodies. Cages containing 40 fighting cocks were scattered in the 10 acres of woods. Several dead roosters were also found. Police and animal-cruelty agents in Bucks County say that was the scene Saturday night during a raid at the home of Edward M. Stevenson, who is suspected of running illegal cock and dog fights at his house on Farm School Lane in Bedminster Township.
NEWS
July 26, 1994 | By Terri Sanginiti, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Thirty-three cock fighting birds were confiscated Sunday night and later destroyed after enforcement officers from the New Jersey SPCA raided a North Camden home and arrested the man who trained the birds. Rafael Bettecourt, 61, of the 900 block of North 20th Street, was taken into custody by SPCA officials and by investigators from the Camden County Prosecutor's Office, who served a search warrant on the home. The arrest is just "the tip of the iceberg," according to an SPCA spokesman, Lt. Sy Goldberg.
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