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ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2004 | Daily News wire services
Here are some tasty serving ideas for fresh asparagus: Dipping sauces, such as aioli, horseradish cream and Romesco, offer a nice excuse to eat grilled asparagus spears with your fingers. Prosciutto-wrapped asparagus spears make an easy after-work snack. If you have time, soften a little cream cheese and spread a dab along the length of each spear before wrapping with prosciutto. Asparagus and smoked salmon on a small bed of baby greens, drizzled with lemon cream dressing, would be good for party menus in April and May. Scatter grated hard-cooked egg and minced fresh parsley over roasted asparagus spears that have been rolled in mustard vinaigrette.
FOOD
March 26, 2009
Salad as still life Continuity is the watchword at Friday Saturday Sunday, at 35 now one of the city's longest-running and loyally patronized dining rooms. Upstairs at the Tank Bar, you can still get the signature jumbo lump crab cake, unfiddled with, just the way you remember it. But owner Weaver Lilley isn't above adding a new wrinkle, or in the current case, a new salad celebrating the Art Museum's "C├ęzanne and Beyond" exhibit, running through May 17. Lilley, a "big C├ęzanne fan," said he studied the artist's still lifes to come up with a salad resonant of their mood.
FOOD
July 26, 1989 | By Sharon MacKenzie, Special to The Inquirer
For a long time, the notion that summertime is when the livin' is easy went hand in hand with the idea that mealtime is when the eating is casual. While we have no quarrel with this pleasant basic concept, we do agree with the late James Beard, who maintained that easy and cool foods can be as elegant and intriguing as their elaborate and hot counterparts. That is why we offer again this month a four-person dinner menu that consists of chilled dishes combined with courses that can be served hot or cold.
FOOD
September 14, 2012 | By Michael Klein, PHILLY.COM
Dine out enough, and you're likely to compile a mental list of your favorite dishes: Dan dan noodles from Han Dynasty, edamame ravioli from Buddakan, linguine with cockles from Paradiso, salade Lyonnaise from Parc. Would it be nice to have the recipes, and maybe the stories behind them? April White, a food writer and communications manager of the Food Trust, offers 50 recipes, including a few cocktails, while putting the Philadelphia dining scene in context in the new cookbook Philadelphia Chef's Table (Lyons Press)
FOOD
January 31, 2001 | by Lynn Hoffman, For the Daily News
If your grandfather made wine in the basement, there's a good chance that his favorite grape was Grenache. It's a red grape from France's Southern Rhone Valley that fruits abundantly in California. Left unpruned, it makes a lot of high-sugar fruit on the vine and a lot of money for its growers. But a profitable grape isn't necessarily a delicious one; in this country at least, Grenache has been a fine-wine flop. Americans loved it for its ability to make a lot of juice in hot conditions.
FOOD
January 13, 1993 | by Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
Few "creamy" salad dressings actually contain real cream - defined as top milk with a very high butterfat content - but they're creamed with excess calories and cholesterol nonetheless. The "creaminess" often comes from the combination of eggs and oil, whipped into an emulsion. Mayonnaise is the prime example of the thick creamy texture that results when egg yolk is whipped into oil. So much oil, in fact, the mayonnaise is much heavier in calories than even the heaviest heavy cream: nearly 100 calories a tablespoon, double the calories of cream, which weighs in at 52 calories a tablespoon.
FOOD
August 14, 1991 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
HARVESTING BARGAINS You can expect to find bargains on fresh vegetables through the rest of the summer and into fall. So say government and private analysts after a U.S. Labor Department report that wholesale prices for tomatoes, lettuce and snap beans had fallen by more than 30 percent in July. Retail produce managers say lower shelf prices are just taking hold. HEALTHY TRENDS Households with children spend more food money on milk and sweets than anyone else. And higher-income families spend more on fish, cheese and butter.
NEWS
October 30, 1987 | By David Hiltbrand, Special to The Inquirer
Beginning a four-night engagement at the Valley Forge Music Fair last night, Julie Andrews unveiled a classy musical act that was elaborate in its autobiographical concept but rather reserved in its execution. Comedian Brian Allen of television's Real People warmed up the crowd with a series of innocuous routines, including the perilous details of living alone. "In my refrigerator," he said, "I have roquefort cheese . . . used to be cheddar. " Then, after the orchestra had played an overture of her best-known tunes, Andrews began her first concert in eight years.
FOOD
March 26, 1986 | By Sharon MacKenzie, Special to The Inquirer
New clothes and joyous holidays are only some of the pleasures promised and fulfilled by the season of vernal rebirth. The dedicated food lover knows that the year's greatest culinary joys are to be found in the annual early arrivals of spring's finest offerings: strawberries and asparagus. Budgets may be slightly dented by these out-of-state crops, but four people can still revel in an affordable feast that matches the excellence of the earth's bounty. Our dishes are easy to prepare, from ingredients available in local supermarkets, at a total cost of less than $15. Here is this month's menu: Roquefort Bouillon Chicken Piccante Asparagus Spears Pasta Pimento Chilled Strawberry Cream All items used in preparing this meal were checked for price and availability in a Philadelphia-area Thriftway market.
NEWS
October 5, 2012
JOSH KIM'S movements are precise as he hovers over his burners, and it's not just because he champions economy of movement. The SPOT Burgers cart is minute, a receiverless phone booth fortified with mustard-yellow and ketchup-red aluminum armor. His bandanna'd head is obscured by order tickets - 60 to 80 an hour during the lunch rush - as he hand-forms patties and puts them on a griddle that facilitates many lunch breaks but never takes its own. A hungry throng dawdles around the bike racks at 33rd and Arch streets, shuffling forward, eyes wide as bottom buns as Kim dings the bell suspended from his window and breaks the always brief silence.
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