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Rosanne Cash

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NEWS
April 4, 2006 | By Keith Harris FOR THE INQUIRER
Kris Kristofferson would belong among the greatest all-time singer-songwriters but for one simple fact: He can't sing. For much of his career, this far-from-insignificant detail has been a bigger handicap than admirers admitted. But judging from Kristofferson's Sunday night performance at the Keswick Theatre, his croak has at last settled warmly into its distinctive crags. The loss of "Me and Bobby McGee," the acceptance of "For the Good Times," and the desperation of "Help Me Make It Through the Night" all sounded more acute in an old man's unsteady voice.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1986 | By Jack Hurst, Special to The Inquirer
Rosanne Cash's 1986 Grammy Award for her performance of "I Don't Know Why You Don't Want Me" is ironically amusing: The idea for the song came from her experience of not winning a Grammy a couple of years ago. Cash, who won in the country female vocalist category, recalled that she got the idea for the song as she was leaving a Grammy ceremonies at which she had lost. However, Cash is not the type to take such losses very seriously. "It was just a joke," she said. "I thought I'd dive into a little self- pity just to see if I could come up with something funny.
NEWS
March 11, 1991 | By Dan DeLuca, Special to The Inquirer
Rosanne Cash put on an "I can't remember the last time I saw anything this good" show at the Theater of Living Arts Saturday night. Everything was just right: the small-scale venue, the sound, the all-of-a-piece song selection, and, most of all, the sweet ache of experience in Cash's voice, even more striking live than it is on record. Cash is a songwriter of the first rank, but her frank explorations of fear, doubt, anger and faith in troubled love haven't been widely heard due to her infrequent albums, reluctance to tour and pigeonholing as a "country" artist.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1986 | By Jack Hurst, Special to The Inquirer
Rosanne Cash, who has never done a music tour of Great Britain, recently went there for an extensive media blitz. In addition to appearing before the 15 million viewers of Terry Wogan's TV show, on which she performed her Grammy-winning single "I Don't Know Why You Don't Want Me" and was interviewed by Wogan, Cash was interviewed for several BBC Radio programs as well as by the London Star, rock fan magazines Sounds and New Musical Express,...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1986 | By Jack Hurst, Special to The Inquirer
Rosanne Cash recently appeared on a segment of the TV music series Austin City Limits with Emmylou Harris, Lacy J. Dalton and Gail Davies, and one of the songs she performed from her current album was a moving one about her father, Johnny Cash. Titled "My Old Man," it is no glorification of "the man in black" but, rather, a plea for empathy for a man worried about the future and "embarrassed by the past. " Asked to explain the latter phrase, the daughter said she was referring to yesterdays when, under the influence of drugs, "he screwed up in public.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2014 | The Inquirer Staff
Joan Lunden fighting cancer Joan Lunden , who hosted ABC's Good Morning America from 1980 to 1997, went on the show Tuesday to say she is fighting breast cancer. This misfortune haunts the show: Cohost Robin Roberts has been treated for it, and so has cohost Amy Robach . Lunden said she had already started chemo and expects to make a full recovery.   Cleese exits Bond movies Monty Python Flying Circus genius John Cleese is out of the James Bond movie series.
NEWS
July 19, 1996 | by Renee Lucas Wayne and Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writers
Remember the days when songs had meaningful lyrics and melodies you could hum? If so, you'll be right at home on the Landing this weekend, as the Independence Blue Cross Singer/Songwriter Weekend, co-produced by Penn's Landing and WXPN (88.5-FM), rolls through. It'll feature the narrations of singer Rosanne Cash, the Latin-tinged rhythms of guitarist Nil Lara and the rocking, foot-stomping beats of the Iguanas. A few local artists, including June Rich and Buzz Zeemer, will also be on hand.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Rosanne Cash started writing songs when she was the same age as many of the high school students she taught Wednesday morning in a master class on songwriting. "I was 18," the 56-year-old singer told about 40 aspiring musicians and writers who gathered in a recital hall flooded with winter sunlight at Springside Chestnut Hill Academy. "And they were bad songs. Really bad. " That couldn't be said for the songs that Cash sang at SCH Academy, such as her 1981 country hit "Seven Year Ache," which she wrote when she was 23, or "Black Cadillac," composed in 2003 after the death of her father, country giant Johnny Cash.
NEWS
April 20, 2010 | By Nicole Pensiero FOR THE INQUIRER
It was clear from the start during Rosanne Cash's performance Sunday night that the singer-songwriter is in a terrific place, career-wise - able to embrace her rich musical legacy as country icon Johnny Cash's daughter, while acknowledging her own three decades as a musical force. Cash - who performed with her five-member band at Collingswood's Scottish Rite Auditorium - kept the focus of the smoothly paced 90-minute show squarely on her most recent album, The List, which pays tribute to country music history through classic songs that her father considered invaluable for her to learn.
NEWS
October 24, 1991 | by Ann Gerhart, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press and New York Daily News contributed to this report
QUOTE "I love feathery hats. My favorite is the Chanel hat that looks like Dr. Seuss-Meets-an-Ostrich, like a ten-gallon champagne hat. " - Miss Kier, singer, Deee-Lite GUNSHOT WOUND WASN'T IN SCRIPT Hmmmm! You decide on this one. There's always been plenty of sizzle in the romance between "Wild Orchid" stars Mickey Rourke and Carre Otis. The seamier among you might recall he took shots of her shackled as a naked supplicant, slathered in oil, which then were published as art in the French magazine Photo.
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NEWS
September 13, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Emmylou Harris and Rodney Crowell are old friends and avatars of important movements underway in traditional country music and Americana, thanks largely to their work, since the mid-1970s. Crowell wrote early signature songs for Harris ("Bluebird Wine" on her 1975 album, Pieces of the Sky ) and played guitar in her famed Hot Band. They're set to perform Sunday at the Keswick Theatre. "We took to each other immediately, felt as if we knew each other forever from the start," Crowell says by phone from the road near Alexandria, Va. When they met in 1974, they shared a record label (Warner Bros.)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2014 | The Inquirer Staff
Joan Lunden fighting cancer Joan Lunden , who hosted ABC's Good Morning America from 1980 to 1997, went on the show Tuesday to say she is fighting breast cancer. This misfortune haunts the show: Cohost Robin Roberts has been treated for it, and so has cohost Amy Robach . Lunden said she had already started chemo and expects to make a full recovery.   Cleese exits Bond movies Monty Python Flying Circus genius John Cleese is out of the James Bond movie series.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2014 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
Suzy Bogguss used a Merle Haggard song as the title of her debut album, 1988's Somewhere Between , and when she recently began to think about doing a set of classic country songs, she returned to the Haggard songbook for ideas. One song led to another, and, with the encouragement of her husband, fellow musician Doug Crider, she ended up with Lucky , an album of Haggard songs. In the early '90s, Bogguss consistently topped the country music charts with hits such as "Someday Soon," "Outbound Plane," "Drive South," and "Hey Cinderella.
NEWS
June 14, 2013
STILL HAVEN'T bought the old man something special for Father's Day this Sunday? Lucky for you, most dads are still into compact discs for their home and car sound rigs. And the music biz keeps courting this clientele with new CD releases by "catalog artists" boasting a long history and heritage. Herewith some primo examples, affordably available at a store near you. * Eric Clapton flaunts his own senior status with "Old Sock" (Surfdog), cool and comfortable countrypolitan renderings of pop standards like "All of Me," "The Folks Who Live on the Hill" and "Our Love is Here to Stay.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Rosanne Cash started writing songs when she was the same age as many of the high school students she taught Wednesday morning in a master class on songwriting. "I was 18," the 56-year-old singer told about 40 aspiring musicians and writers who gathered in a recital hall flooded with winter sunlight at Springside Chestnut Hill Academy. "And they were bad songs. Really bad. " That couldn't be said for the songs that Cash sang at SCH Academy, such as her 1981 country hit "Seven Year Ache," which she wrote when she was 23, or "Black Cadillac," composed in 2003 after the death of her father, country giant Johnny Cash.
NEWS
August 12, 2010 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
It should come as no surprise that Rosanne Cash's beautifully observed, often heartbreaking new memoir, Composed (Viking, $26.95), reads in many ways like a song cycle: thematically linked, full of intense emotions and vivid moments of intimacy, of discovery, of pain. In her introduction, the singer/songwriter, daughter of Johnny Cash and stepdaughter of June Carter, writes about a life circumscribed by music: "I have learned more from songs than I ever did from any teacher in school.
NEWS
April 20, 2010 | By Nicole Pensiero FOR THE INQUIRER
It was clear from the start during Rosanne Cash's performance Sunday night that the singer-songwriter is in a terrific place, career-wise - able to embrace her rich musical legacy as country icon Johnny Cash's daughter, while acknowledging her own three decades as a musical force. Cash - who performed with her five-member band at Collingswood's Scottish Rite Auditorium - kept the focus of the smoothly paced 90-minute show squarely on her most recent album, The List, which pays tribute to country music history through classic songs that her father considered invaluable for her to learn.
NEWS
April 4, 2006 | By Keith Harris FOR THE INQUIRER
Kris Kristofferson would belong among the greatest all-time singer-songwriters but for one simple fact: He can't sing. For much of his career, this far-from-insignificant detail has been a bigger handicap than admirers admitted. But judging from Kristofferson's Sunday night performance at the Keswick Theatre, his croak has at last settled warmly into its distinctive crags. The loss of "Me and Bobby McGee," the acceptance of "For the Good Times," and the desperation of "Help Me Make It Through the Night" all sounded more acute in an old man's unsteady voice.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2006 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
In March of 2003, when Rosanne Cash wrote the title song to her new album, Black Cadillac, everyone was still alive. "I had this vision of a hearse driving away in my mind," the singer and daughter of Johnny Cash says. "I was a little alarmed that I wrote it before anybody died. But my dad's health had been bad for a while by then. " Then the vision became real, three times. Her stepmother, June Carter Cash, passed in May of that year. Johnny Cash died in September. And her mother, Vivian Liberto Cash Distin, died in May 2005.
NEWS
July 19, 1996 | by Renee Lucas Wayne and Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writers
Remember the days when songs had meaningful lyrics and melodies you could hum? If so, you'll be right at home on the Landing this weekend, as the Independence Blue Cross Singer/Songwriter Weekend, co-produced by Penn's Landing and WXPN (88.5-FM), rolls through. It'll feature the narrations of singer Rosanne Cash, the Latin-tinged rhythms of guitarist Nil Lara and the rocking, foot-stomping beats of the Iguanas. A few local artists, including June Rich and Buzz Zeemer, will also be on hand.
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