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Rosh Hashanah

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NEWS
September 14, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
There will be a couple of innovations this Rosh Hashanah at Torah Links of South Jersey, in Cherry Hill: One of the services will be shorter than usual, and there will be more prayers in English. Other than that, as it will be across the region and the world, familiar holiday traditions - prayers, songs, the blowing of shofars, and reflection in synagogues - will be observed as the Jewish high holidays begin with Rosh Hashanah at sundown Sunday. The sound of the shofar - a ram's horn - will announce the start of the holidays.
NEWS
September 15, 1993 | by Leigh Jackson, Daily News Staff Writer
Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, begins tonight at sunset. And for most Jews, this year is the newest of new years. No longer are Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization the bitterest of enemies. No longer are they refusing to talk to each other. Year 5754 on the Jewish calendar has brought an historic accord between them. Israel and the PLO officially recognized each other in a White House ceremony Monday. The accord is a first step in what many hope will lead to resolution of long-intractable differences over land and leadership.
FOOD
September 13, 2012 | By Jim Romanoff, Associated Press
Laura Frankel thinks about Rosh Hashanah in simple terms: "A time for Mom to shine. " That's because the Jewish new year, which is the first high holy day to occur each autumn, usually isn't celebrated with the sort of big gathering you might have for a Passover seder, but rather a smaller, more contemplative meal with close family, says Frankel, the chef at Spertus, a Jewish culture center in Chicago. And though there are some traditional symbolic foods included - such as a big round challah loaf to represent the continuing cycle of life, and apples dipped in honey to start off the new year on a sweet note - Frankel says the meal most often is built around one of mom's comfort meals, such as a brisket or roast chicken.
NEWS
September 13, 1996 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
On Sunday afternoon, as this weekend's observance of Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish new year, is ending, members of Temple Beth Zion Beth Israel will meet at the Walnut Street Bridge and descend a staircase to the Schuylkill, bread crumbs in their hands. In Mount Airy, members of the P'Nai Or Jewish Renewal community will walk solemnly to the banks of Wissahickon Creek, then reach into pockets and handbags for scraps of lint or dust. Other Jews will walk to stream banks, ponds, even the beach at Atlantic City to toss bread upon the waters.
NEWS
September 30, 2000 | by Chris Brennan , Daily News Staff Writer
As Rabbi Fred Neulander considers his sins during these High Holy days, his attorneys are making moves to free him from jail and move his murder trial away from Camden. Rosh Hashanah, an introspective time when Jews begin their new year, began at sundown yesterday. Neulander observed the holiday from behind bars. "He says this is the roughest it's been," attorney Dennis Wixted said. "He's focusing on his sins and his need for repentance. Unfortunately, the things he's in there for are not the things he needs to repent for. " Prosecutors and two confessed hit men contend the rabbi set up the November 1994 beating death of his wife, Carol, in their Cherry Hill home.
FOOD
September 21, 2006 | By Beverly Levitt FOR THE INQUIRER
This year, after returning from a recent trip to Israel, my celebration of Rosh Hashanah will be bittersweet. As I prepare the New Year meal for my family, my heart will be with the people I met in Jerusalem: with one woman who evacuated her home because Katyusha rockets were landing so close; with one 13-year-old boy who fled Haifa with his family just a few hours before his bar mitzvah. So I decided to honor those people I met, by incorporating some of their traditions and recipes into my own family celebration.
NEWS
September 12, 2007 | By Michael D. Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rabbi Jerome David sat at the edge of Pleasant Bay on Cape Cod's elbow a few weeks ago and thought hard about his Rosh Hashanah sermon. He mused over what he would say to his congregation at Temple Emanuel, back in Cherry Hill, pondering the wisdom he could extract from all the reading and interviewing he had already done. Preaching at Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur is one of the most challenging assignments in the rabbi's calendar, and tonight David's congregation will hear the results of his research and reflection.
NEWS
September 29, 2000 | by Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
Seems like this would be the beginning of a particularly important holy season for Jewish people: Not only is tonight the beginning of Rosh Hashanah, but a presidential election - featuring a devout Jew - looms a little more than a month away. Not so, say rabbis throughout the city. They are planning a traditional Rosh Hashanah, the introspective beginning to the High Holidays and a new year, with little or no thought being given to politics and the election. "Why concentrate on anything but religious aspects of those three days?"
NEWS
September 6, 2002 | By Sally Friedman
Last year, as we gathered for Rosh Hashanah, one thought upstaged all the others: Michael is fine. Our cheerful, rosy-cheeked, funny son-in-law managed to get out of the area near the World Trade Center and had come home unscathed to our daughter and their two young sons. Immediately there was that intensely personal, almost selfish, relief. We were fine. But after a year of processing, we realize that we are not fine. In fact, another son-in-law, a psychiatrist, might say we're in denial, daily trying to escape our lingering dark thoughts.
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NEWS
June 11, 2016
ISSUE | MUSLIM HOLIDAYS Call Christian breaks by their names, too After reading that Mayor Kenney and the Philadelphia School District will add two Muslim holidays to the school calendar ("Phila. schools add 2 Muslim holidays," June 1) and looking at the list of school holidays for the next school year, I wondered: Are Christians chopped liver? The Jewish holidays of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur are named, and the Muslim holidays - Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha - will be identified, but Christmas and Easter are referred to as winter and spring breaks.
NEWS
September 23, 2015 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the empty sanctuary at Richboro's Ohev Shalom synagogue on Friday, the temple's rabbi, cantor, and Hebrew school principal huddled around an iPhone 6. They were critiquing a rough cut of their educational video about the Avinu Malkeinu prayer, a request for God's blessings that is recited during Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. "I think we need to hear more of you," Rabbi Eliott Perlstein told the cantor, Annelise Ocanto-Romo. "Your singing needs to be part of the lead-in. " Ohev Shalom's congregants received the four-minute video over the weekend in an email blast that encouraged them to forward it to friends.
NEWS
September 14, 2015 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
There will be a couple of innovations this Rosh Hashanah at Torah Links of South Jersey, in Cherry Hill: One of the services will be shorter than usual, and there will be more prayers in English. Other than that, as it will be across the region and the world, familiar holiday traditions - prayers, songs, the blowing of shofars, and reflection in synagogues - will be observed as the Jewish high holidays begin with Rosh Hashanah at sundown Sunday. The sound of the shofar - a ram's horn - will announce the start of the holidays.
FOOD
September 11, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Confession: I have never had a tuna-noodle casserole. I don't know what that is, exactly, and don't harbor much curiosity. It just doesn't sound that appealing to me. You, on the other hand, may have grown up eating some variation of this unfussy, belly-filling comfort food that laughs in the face of low-carb diet fads. For me, that comfort food is kugel. This catchall genre of starchy, egg-bound casserole shows up at almost every Jewish holiday table in one form or another.
NEWS
October 1, 2014 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
RABBI DAVID KUSHNER is having a rough start to the Jewish New Year. "We're trying to look at this situation positively," Kushner, of Rhawnhurst, told the Daily News last night. "The year can only get better from here. " Early Thursday, his Ford Explorer was torched as it sat parked in the lot next to the Rodef Sholom Synagogue in Atlantic City, the rabbi said. Kushner recently became the synagogue's rabbi, and had parked the SUV in the lot Wednesday night before conducting Rosh Hashanah services.
BUSINESS
September 26, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
A SEPTA janitorial worker and the transit agency are fighting over the worker's dismissal for refusing to work on holy days, including Rosh Hashanah. Romel McAlpin of Germantown was fired last year by SEPTA for refusing to work on Rosh Hashanah and Oct. 12, his Sabbath. McAlpin, according to legal documents, is an adherent of the Israelite Church of God in Jesus Christ, a sect that observes Jewish holy days and marks the Sabbath from sundown Friday to sundown Saturday. McAlpin, a maintenance custodian in subway tunnels, notified SEPTA of his religious beliefs shortly after he was hired in May 2012, according to a legal brief filed by Transport Workers Union Local 234. SEPTA permitted McAlpin to trade days off with other workers to accommodate his beliefs, but only with workers with less seniority, citing seniority clauses in its union contract.
NEWS
September 25, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rabbi Yisroel Serebrowski returned to a study table holding a polished black shofar, or ram's horn. He raised it to his lips and blew, sending out a series of high, squeaky notes. He scowled. "I could do better," he said. He blew again, this time puffing his cheeks. This time, the shofar emitted a series of long, plaintive notes that filled the small sanctuary of Torah Links of South Jersey, his center for traditional Torah study in Cherry Hill. "This is the sound of Rosh Hashanah," he said.
FOOD
September 19, 2014 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
Back-to-school energy pervades September - even decades past graduation. For Jews around the world, this sense is heightened by the overlapping of the Jewish New Year. Rosh Hashanah, literally "head of the year," celebrates ending and beginning again. As part of the annual High Holiday rituals of taking stock, making amends, and looking forward there are opportunities for feasting and fasting, and always there are wishes for a "sweet new year. " That translates at the table to a widespread tradition of eating apples and honey, and other treats at the holiday table.
NEWS
September 5, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
To prepare students for Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish new year, Rabbi Danielle Stillman thought about the bees. The four hives of pollinators on the Ursinus College organic farm had lessons to teach, about tradition and responsibility. "Honey is one of the symbols of the holiday, to wish for a sweet new year," said Stillman, adviser to the Montgomery County school's Hillel, a Jewish campus organization. But the plight of honeybees, a threatened population that pollinates fruits and vegetables, also offers lessons about the environment for the faithful in a religion that has a lot to say about stewardship of the earth, the rabbi said.
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