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NEWS
July 2, 2007
EARLIER this year, Mayor Street requested that City Council review housing regulations to require affordable and low-income housing in new developments. While it's exciting that officials are addressing the affordability crisis, there's an equally important issue that must be included in the conversation - accessible housing for Philadelphians with disabilities. According to the 2005 U.S. Census, 10 percent of residents 16 to 64 have a physical disability. In addition, adults with disabilities tend to live in poverty at higher rates than the general population, placing a premium on options that are accessible and affordable.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1986 | By STUART D. BYKOFSKY, Daily News Staff Writer
The MOVE disaster occurred a little more than a year ago, and the made-for- TV movie that will tell that story might start shooting by this fall, if all the pieces fall into place. That's a big "if," according to executive producer Jim Thebaut. "We're just into the second draft," he said in a telephone interview from his Carson Production office in Burbank. "Usually, there are a couple of drafts and a polish and then it has to be approved," he said. Following the process, Thebaut said, "is like watching grass grow.
SPORTS
May 5, 2008 | By Don McKee, Inquirer Staff Writer
Poison ivy Peace suddenly reigns in the battle of Wrigley. The Chicago Cubs and the defiant owner of three rooftop clubs overlooking the field have buried the hatchet. Tom Gramatis owns the clubs that allow guests to watch the game from atop houses outside the field. For years he hung on against a threat from Cubs' officials to erect screens that would block the views from the rooftop seats. But in an agreement reached Friday, Gramatis will continue to pay 17 percent of his profits from two rooftop clubs through 2023.
REAL_ESTATE
April 17, 1986 | By MARC MELTZER, Daily News Staff Writer
For years, Manhattan's wealthiest have used cooperative housing techniques to live in some of New York's most luxurious buildings. Now the same approach is starting to be used in Philadelphia to provide rehabilitated housing for the city's working poor and others who can't afford conventional single-family homes. Other cities in the Northeast and Midwest have used cooperative housing for years as a housing alternative for their less affluent citizens. But the idea has been slow to develop in Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 30, 1986 | By Jan Hefler, Special to The Inquirer
Pennsauken Township officials are planning a drive to fix up and clean up two of the oldest sections of the township to prevent the areas from becoming blighted. Township construction official Art Johnson said that his inspectors would survey the areas, which cover nearly 150 square blocks, in the southern end of the community to locate run-down properties and have owners make needed repairs. If owners fail to make the repairs voluntarily, they would be cited for code violations.
NEWS
April 12, 1996 | by Marisol Bello, Daily News Staff Writer
The Logan neighborhood once bustled with active residents and tidy row-houses. Then it sunk to the ground as water erosion destroyed nearly 900 homes in a 17-block area. Yesterday, it became a political football. Former Judge John Braxton, fighting a heated battle with Congressman Thomas M. Foglietta for control of the congressional district that includes Logan, cited the neighborhood to attack his opponent. "Years ago, Tom Foglietta came up here among much fanfare," said Braxton, standing on an empty lot on the corner of 9th Street and Wyoming Avenue, where homes once stood.
NEWS
November 27, 2009 | By Jeff Davidson, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the green architecture movement taking the housing industry by storm, there's nothing more eco-friendly than buying and restoring an old house or even updating the one you have. Ingrid Abramovitch's new book, Restoring a House in the City: A Guide to Renovating Town Houses, Brownstones, and Row Houses (Artisan Books, $40), offers an outline for work at any stage of the renovating process with the goal of satisfaction with the final product. Philadelphia is a prime location for applying the ideas in her book, the author said.
NEWS
June 30, 2010 | By Nathan Gorenstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Four Ukrainian brothers are under arrest and a fifth is being sought on charges that for seven years they staffed their Philadelphia cleaning business with illegal immigrants kept in virtual bondage by threats, intimidation and rape. U.S. Attorney Zane Memeger said the brothers found the mostly male workers in their native Ukraine, and smuggled them in through Mexico with the promise of a legitimate job. Instead, they worked 16 hour days cleaning retail and grocery stores and were paid little, if anything.
REAL_ESTATE
January 18, 1998 | By Sheila Dyan, FOR THE INQUIRER
1500 Locust Apartments, Center City, Philadelphia From bottom to top, 1500 Locust Apartments offers its residents a lifestyle appreciated by the young and restless, as well as the more settled. For John Washington, 51, a resident for 21 years, convenience to the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, where Washington works in clinical research, is the building's biggest asset, along with the feeling of comfort Washington says he gets knowing that an attendant is at the front desk around the clock.
SPORTS
September 8, 1990 | By Michael Bamberger, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Phillies looked like a legitimate baseball team again last night. They defeated David Cone, Tom Herr and the New York Mets, 4-1, disappointing a good portion of the 29,744 baseball buffs who came hoping to see the Mets make a move in the National League East pennant race. The Phillies would not be bullied, as they handed their archrivals their fifth straight defeat, through which the Mets have scored a mere three runs. With the Mets and the Pirates losing, there was no movement in the lofty reaches of the division - the Bucs lead the Mets by 3 1/2 games.
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NEWS
December 4, 2013 | BY JASON NARK & DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writersnarkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
A FRANTIC young man kicked in the door of a Strawberry Mansion rowhouse Tuesday afternoon and was greeted by the stench of charred wood and kerosene as his family fell apart outside. "Mom, it's all burned up in here," the young man yelled before rushing outside. The man didn't know that just hours earlier, his elderly grandfather narrowly escaped a fire there or that his housemate, Martha Frazier, 92, was found dead amid the wreckage in a second-floor bedroom of the blue brick house on Stanley Street near Norris.
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, WILLIAM BENDER and DERRICK MOORE, Daily News Staff Writers zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
Neighbors said Melissa Ketunuti, a young doctor who lived in Center City, dedicated herself to three things: her work, her dog Pooch, and her health. The petite, pretty young woman could often be seen in her quiet section of Center City walking Pooch, a black-lab mix, heading to work or going for a morning run. So when a woman believed to be Ketunuti was found slain in the basement of her house Monday afternoon - her hands and feet bound behind her back and her body set afire - the tight-knit block of Naudain Street near 17th where she lived was shaken to its core.
NEWS
June 30, 2010 | By Nathan Gorenstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Four Ukrainian brothers are under arrest and a fifth is being sought on charges that for seven years they staffed their Philadelphia cleaning business with illegal immigrants kept in virtual bondage by threats, intimidation and rape. U.S. Attorney Zane Memeger said the brothers found the mostly male workers in their native Ukraine, and smuggled them in through Mexico with the promise of a legitimate job. Instead, they worked 16 hour days cleaning retail and grocery stores and were paid little, if anything.
NEWS
November 27, 2009 | By Jeff Davidson, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the green architecture movement taking the housing industry by storm, there's nothing more eco-friendly than buying and restoring an old house or even updating the one you have. Ingrid Abramovitch's new book, Restoring a House in the City: A Guide to Renovating Town Houses, Brownstones, and Row Houses (Artisan Books, $40), offers an outline for work at any stage of the renovating process with the goal of satisfaction with the final product. Philadelphia is a prime location for applying the ideas in her book, the author said.
SPORTS
May 5, 2008 | By Don McKee, Inquirer Staff Writer
Poison ivy Peace suddenly reigns in the battle of Wrigley. The Chicago Cubs and the defiant owner of three rooftop clubs overlooking the field have buried the hatchet. Tom Gramatis owns the clubs that allow guests to watch the game from atop houses outside the field. For years he hung on against a threat from Cubs' officials to erect screens that would block the views from the rooftop seats. But in an agreement reached Friday, Gramatis will continue to pay 17 percent of his profits from two rooftop clubs through 2023.
NEWS
July 2, 2007
EARLIER this year, Mayor Street requested that City Council review housing regulations to require affordable and low-income housing in new developments. While it's exciting that officials are addressing the affordability crisis, there's an equally important issue that must be included in the conversation - accessible housing for Philadelphians with disabilities. According to the 2005 U.S. Census, 10 percent of residents 16 to 64 have a physical disability. In addition, adults with disabilities tend to live in poverty at higher rates than the general population, placing a premium on options that are accessible and affordable.
NEWS
August 26, 2004 | By PATTY-PAT KOZLOWSKI
DANNY BROUGH did not intend to kill Capt. John Taylor and Firefighter Rey Rubio last Friday evening when the two became trapped in Brough's basement fighting a fire. In fact, as Taylor and Rubio faced a dark, smoky cellar and became tangled in wires and grates, Brough stood on the front lawn of his neighbor's house and held his two boxer dogs and watched in horror as his house burned. How do I know? I was a few feet away, and I heard him utter, "Oh, my God, I f----ed up. " Port Richmond residents watched in silent prayer as Rubio and then Taylor were pulled from the basement with their crew ferociously pounding on their chests and performing CPR to get the men to start breathing again.
NEWS
August 1, 2002 | By WILLIAM STULL & RICHARD BERNSTEIN
THE 2000 CENSUS revealed that many of the nation's largest cities experienced population growth during the nineties. Unfortunately, Philadelphia was not one of them. Despite significant accomplishments, the City of Brotherly Love continued its downward slide in population that began in 1950. Tourism has been identified as an industry that could reverse this trend in the coming years. For this to happen, the city has to become something it has never been in the past: a significant tourist destination for people living outside the Philadelphia metropolitan area.
NEWS
June 24, 1999 | By Steven Conn
Much has been lost in Wissinoming. People's homes have been destroyed. Neighborhood relationships have been strained. Lives have been disrupted profoundly. Most frustrating of all, perhaps, it isn't at all clear that this was anyone's fault. Work crews may have weakened the foundations upon which those houses sat, or those foundations may have been laid improperly three quarters of a century ago, or the Delaware River, one of whose small tributaries got filled in to build those houses, may have had the last laugh.
REAL_ESTATE
January 18, 1998 | By Sheila Dyan, FOR THE INQUIRER
1500 Locust Apartments, Center City, Philadelphia From bottom to top, 1500 Locust Apartments offers its residents a lifestyle appreciated by the young and restless, as well as the more settled. For John Washington, 51, a resident for 21 years, convenience to the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, where Washington works in clinical research, is the building's biggest asset, along with the feeling of comfort Washington says he gets knowing that an attendant is at the front desk around the clock.
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