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Rowan College

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NEWS
April 30, 1996
When a school that's not quite a school procures free tuition for all 156 members of its first class, it earns an "A" for creative marketing - and corporate America deserves some credit for funding it. Rowan College, the New Jersey institution formerly known as Glassboro State College, is using the free tuition offer as a lure for its new School of Engineering. The school hasn't yet hired a full faculty, won't open its $30 million building until 1997 and won't be accredited until it graduates its first class in the year 2000.
NEWS
October 15, 1992 | By Tia Swanson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Rowan College Board of Trustees, flush with its new-found wealth, voted to spend $350,000 of it last night. The money, which represents nearly two-thirds of what the college has predicted it will earn this year from Henry Rowan's initial gift of $25 million, will be used to finance various programs and changes brought about by the college's name change. For example, $72,000 will be spent on new athletic uniforms and $17,000 on new athletic brochures. A revised college catalogue will cost $25,000 and a firm that is supposed to market the new name will cost $35,000.
NEWS
December 18, 1995 | By David Kinney, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Here at the Sony Music manufacturing plant, the engineers say they solve problems the way most folks do, believe it or not: They try everything and anything, then settle for the first option that does the trick. It was a few years ago that the director of engineering, Chet Dawson, figured that his staff ought to take a course on statistical analysis and other techniques to break problems down and find the best solutions in a hurry. Problem was, there was no such course - at least, not in New Jersey.
NEWS
September 3, 1992 | By Tia Swanson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
How did the theme song to Welcome Back, Kotter go? Wasn't there a line, "Welcome back . . . Well, the names have all changed since you hung around . . . " Glassboro State College, er, Rowan College of New Jersey, welcomed back its most famous alumnus Monday. Robert Hegyes, Epstein on the show, took the red- eye flight east from California Sunday, arriving in Glassboro just in time to take his place in the college's forum about its name change. On Tuesday, Glassboro State officially changed its name to Rowan College of New Jersey, in honor of Henry and Betty Rowan, who pledged $100 million to the college early in July.
NEWS
October 18, 1992 | By Tia Swanson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The second violins were being led by a man in white tube socks and Docksiders, with a beard, glasses and gray, thinning hair. And there was a first violinist with a bald spot, wearing Hush Puppies, navy socks, navy slacks and a powder-blue golf shirt. Not exactly what you'd expect from a college string ensemble. But then this is not just any college string ensemble. This is the string ensemble at Rowan College of New Jersey. Half the students who participate are older than 60. The over-60s are all part of the Senior Scholar Program at Rowan.
NEWS
August 21, 1995 | By David Kinney, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Next month, when the centerpiece of Henry M. Rowan's vision - an ambitious new engineering program - welcomes its first handful of students, the place once known as Glassboro State will be long forgotten. It has been three years since Rowan, the multimillionaire founder of Rancocas-based Inductotherm Industries, pledged $100 million to the state college to improve existing programs and build an engineering school from the ground up. The college has since weathered controversy and court battles over a decision to rename itself in Rowan's honor.
NEWS
July 7, 1992 | By Tia Swanson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Glassboro State College yesterday received a pledge of $100 million from Henry and Betty Rowan of Rancocas, the largest gift ever given to a public college or university in the United States. In return, college officials promised to rename the school Rowan College of New Jersey. Rowan is the founder and chairman of Inductotherm Inc., an international industrial furnace manufacturing company with headquarters in Rancocas, Burlington County. The firm has annual sales of more than $500 million.
NEWS
February 1, 1995 | By Jane M. Reynolds, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Freshmen at Rowan College of New Jersey who had combined SAT scores of 1200 or higher and ranked in the top fifth of their high school class have kissed those tuition blues goodbye. They aren't paying a dime. The college, through its Trustee Scholarship program, has offered four years of free tuition to such students. Now, all they have to do is remain in good academic standing, which means making sure their grade point average doesn't fall below 3.0 for two semesters in a row. In-state tuition at the college is now $2,342 per year.
NEWS
August 17, 1995 | By Tara Dooley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In response to a borough suit against the state over property taxes at Rowan College, the Attorney General's Office has denied Glassboro's claim that it deserves more money. The response, filed Tuesday in Mercer County Superior Court, disputes the borough's contention that properties owned by the New Jersey Educational Facilities Authority should be included in the state's in-lieu-of-tax payments - the money New Jersey pays municipalities instead of property taxes. It also denies that Glassboro spends "large sums of money" on services for the school.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 4, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
After a second stint as New Jersey education commissioner, David C. Hespe is stepping down. Hespe announced Friday that he would resign effective at the end of September. He was named by Gov. Christie in February 2014. His timing coincides with the beginning of a new school year for more than one million New Jersey public school students. "We are entering another school year, which represents a time of transition for thousands of students. Just as they will be embarking on a new stage of life, I have decided that the time is right for me to do the same," Hespe said in a statement.
NEWS
July 25, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Richard J. Ambacher Jr. met his future wife, Elaine Bonelli, in an algebra class at Wildwood High School in the early 1950s. "He was so good at math," she said, and so she accepted his offer to tutor her at her home. It was on an early visit, she said, that she realized that "he was living alone" in Wildwood. "He had left his family in Philadelphia; they were breaking up. " She never found out where he was living, just that in his Wildwood life, "he had an awful time. " When her father, who owned a supermarket in Wildwood, learned of Mr. Ambacher's problem, "my father said, 'Come eat at our house.' And he did. " Often.
NEWS
July 19, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
At past college freshman summer orientations, Rowan College at Burlington County administrators noticed that a surprising group of people kept showing up: parents. They were able to learn the ins and outs of the school, but it was supposed to be student orientation. "That was good in terms of the student having the support network right there with them," said Cathy Briggs, the Burlington County community college's dean of student success. "What it cut into was the students' ability to … make connections with other students, because they were sitting with their parents.
NEWS
June 23, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Marvin G. Sills was director of admissions from 1991 to 2006 at a time of profound change for what is now Rowan University. In 1992, Glassboro State College became Rowan College of New Jersey following a $100 million pledge from Henry and Betty Rowan, and in 1997 it became Rowan University. "Marvin was responsible for developing a very aggressive and successful program at Rowan," said Phil Tumminia, former executive vice president for advancement at Rowan, to whom Mr. Sills reported.
NEWS
June 14, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
After receiving straight A's her first semester at Rutgers University, Katie E. Keane left for community college. A month before Keane graduated high school in 2012, her father attempted suicide. Keane thought she could handle starting college on top of the personal stress — and on paper, academically, she had. But she ended the semester mentally exhausted, physically sick, and emotionally fragmented. "So when it came to January, when it was time to start again, I just said ‘I can't do this right now,' " Keane said.
SPORTS
June 10, 2016 | By Phil Anastasia, STAFF WRITER
To Devin Smeltzer, the 140th pitch felt like the first. "I had no idea my pitch count was that high," Smeltzer said. "I felt great. " Smeltzer, a sophomore left-handed pitcher at San Jacinto (Texas) Community College, threw 140 pitches in an 8-1 win over Chattahoochee (Ala.) Valley in the junior college national semifinals June 3. He struck out 20. He said he felt "great" the next day. The overpowering performance highlighted Smeltzer's development in the two years since his graduation from Bishop Eustace and explained why he's such an intriguing professional prospect on the verge of the major-league baseball draft, which is set for Thursday through Saturday.
NEWS
May 24, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
As financial pressures mount on community colleges, some schools have begun to openly compete: crossing county lines and marketing to a wider pool of students. In South Jersey, Camden County College has frozen its tuition and mandatory fees for a second year in part because nearby schools remain less expensive. Community colleges in Burlington and Gloucester Counties are aggressively marketing their partnerships with Rowan University to students throughout the region. Driving increased competition are several long-term factors: fewer high school graduates, flat or falling enrollment, and reduction in state funding.
NEWS
May 18, 2016
A story Sunday on long-term-care insurance wrongly named Cynthia Christopher's husband. He is Fred Slifer. A story Sunday on financial robo-advisers gave an out-of-date figure for Betterment.com's assets under management. Betterment robo-advises $4.4 billion. A story Monday on Rowan College at Burlington County valedictorian Kevin P. Wright wrongly described when he gave his commencement speech. He spoke last week.
NEWS
May 17, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
Three degrees in three years. Two commencements within a month — interrupted by starting an Ivy League master's degree. It took Kevin P. Wright, 44, a while to figure out how to pursue higher education, but when he got started, he really went after it. Wright, who received his GED in 2013, is this year's valedictorian at Rowan College at Burlington County. After delivering his commencement speech there Saturday, he will receive his bachelor's diploma from Thomas Jefferson University in June.
NEWS
April 12, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
It's a $1.5 billion annual problem: One in four college freshmen needs at least one remedial course in English, reading, or math. These "developmental" courses delay students from taking college-level work, often frustrating them as they burn through savings and financial aid for classes that don't count toward their degrees. "I had students coming in asking me, 'Do you know of any scholarships, because I ran out of financial aid?' and when I looked at their transcripts, they had four or five developmental classes," said Linda A. Hurlburt, vice president for academic services at Rowan College at Gloucester County.
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