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Rowan College

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NEWS
December 10, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Caitlyn Ricci and her parents sat on opposite sides of the Camden courtroom, emblematic of a deep family divide. On the right was Ricci, 21, wearing a solid green shirt and black dress pants, with her attorney. On the left side, seated together, were her divorced parents: middle school English teacher Maura McGarvey and varsity high school basketball coach Michael Ricci, joined by each of their attorneys. Superior Court Judge Thomas Shusted Jr. implored both sides - who have fought more than a year over who should pay Caitlyn Ricci's college tuition - to stop bickering.
NEWS
April 30, 1996
When a school that's not quite a school procures free tuition for all 156 members of its first class, it earns an "A" for creative marketing - and corporate America deserves some credit for funding it. Rowan College, the New Jersey institution formerly known as Glassboro State College, is using the free tuition offer as a lure for its new School of Engineering. The school hasn't yet hired a full faculty, won't open its $30 million building until 1997 and won't be accredited until it graduates its first class in the year 2000.
NEWS
October 15, 1992 | By Tia Swanson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Rowan College Board of Trustees, flush with its new-found wealth, voted to spend $350,000 of it last night. The money, which represents nearly two-thirds of what the college has predicted it will earn this year from Henry Rowan's initial gift of $25 million, will be used to finance various programs and changes brought about by the college's name change. For example, $72,000 will be spent on new athletic uniforms and $17,000 on new athletic brochures. A revised college catalogue will cost $25,000 and a firm that is supposed to market the new name will cost $35,000.
NEWS
December 18, 1995 | By David Kinney, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Here at the Sony Music manufacturing plant, the engineers say they solve problems the way most folks do, believe it or not: They try everything and anything, then settle for the first option that does the trick. It was a few years ago that the director of engineering, Chet Dawson, figured that his staff ought to take a course on statistical analysis and other techniques to break problems down and find the best solutions in a hurry. Problem was, there was no such course - at least, not in New Jersey.
NEWS
September 3, 1992 | By Tia Swanson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
How did the theme song to Welcome Back, Kotter go? Wasn't there a line, "Welcome back . . . Well, the names have all changed since you hung around . . . " Glassboro State College, er, Rowan College of New Jersey, welcomed back its most famous alumnus Monday. Robert Hegyes, Epstein on the show, took the red- eye flight east from California Sunday, arriving in Glassboro just in time to take his place in the college's forum about its name change. On Tuesday, Glassboro State officially changed its name to Rowan College of New Jersey, in honor of Henry and Betty Rowan, who pledged $100 million to the college early in July.
NEWS
October 18, 1992 | By Tia Swanson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The second violins were being led by a man in white tube socks and Docksiders, with a beard, glasses and gray, thinning hair. And there was a first violinist with a bald spot, wearing Hush Puppies, navy socks, navy slacks and a powder-blue golf shirt. Not exactly what you'd expect from a college string ensemble. But then this is not just any college string ensemble. This is the string ensemble at Rowan College of New Jersey. Half the students who participate are older than 60. The over-60s are all part of the Senior Scholar Program at Rowan.
NEWS
August 21, 1995 | By David Kinney, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Next month, when the centerpiece of Henry M. Rowan's vision - an ambitious new engineering program - welcomes its first handful of students, the place once known as Glassboro State will be long forgotten. It has been three years since Rowan, the multimillionaire founder of Rancocas-based Inductotherm Industries, pledged $100 million to the state college to improve existing programs and build an engineering school from the ground up. The college has since weathered controversy and court battles over a decision to rename itself in Rowan's honor.
NEWS
July 7, 1992 | By Tia Swanson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Glassboro State College yesterday received a pledge of $100 million from Henry and Betty Rowan of Rancocas, the largest gift ever given to a public college or university in the United States. In return, college officials promised to rename the school Rowan College of New Jersey. Rowan is the founder and chairman of Inductotherm Inc., an international industrial furnace manufacturing company with headquarters in Rancocas, Burlington County. The firm has annual sales of more than $500 million.
NEWS
February 1, 1995 | By Jane M. Reynolds, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Freshmen at Rowan College of New Jersey who had combined SAT scores of 1200 or higher and ranked in the top fifth of their high school class have kissed those tuition blues goodbye. They aren't paying a dime. The college, through its Trustee Scholarship program, has offered four years of free tuition to such students. Now, all they have to do is remain in good academic standing, which means making sure their grade point average doesn't fall below 3.0 for two semesters in a row. In-state tuition at the college is now $2,342 per year.
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SPORTS
July 2, 2015 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
Woodstown defensive back Dillon Hill admits that his final football game will be an emotional one, simply because he never wanted to see his career end. Hill will participate Wednesday in the Adam Taliaferro Foundation All-Star Football Classic at Rowan University. The game, which features many of the top graduating seniors in South Jersey, will kick off at 7 p.m. Listed on the roster at 5-foot-5 and 145 pounds, Hill was hoping to play college football but was told by many that he was too small.
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Students at Burlington County College will soon find themselves at a new school: Rowan College at Burlington County. As part of a new partnership with Rowan University, BCC will change its name to Rowan College at Burlington County, the schools announced Wednesday. This marks the second such partnership Rowan has made with a community college, following one that saw Gloucester County College change its name to Rowan College at Gloucester County last year. The schools will make a formal announcement Thursday; their respective trustee boards authorized the partnership agreement Wednesday.
NEWS
June 5, 2015 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Columnist
Freshman second baseman Bill Watson hit an absolute rope, and at first glance, with the bases loaded and two outs in the fourth inning, the eyes of his Haddon Heights baseball team got extremely big. Somehow, Middlesex second baseman Josh Palazzi was able to make a leaping stab, timing his jump perfectly and foiling a chance for the Garnets to hit the scoreboard. The Garnets were trailing 1-0 at the time, and that was one of many big plays that Middlesex made Wednesday during a 6-1 win over Haddon Heights at Rowan College at Gloucester County in a state Group 1 semifinal.
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON - New Jersey's colleges should reconsider the traditional "high aid, high tuition" funding model long in place, a task force on college affordability was told Wednesday. Steven M. Rose, president of Passaic County Community College, said he believed the funding model had grown unconsciously over time: When the state cut or limited funding, public colleges and universities would raise tuition, and the state money would go toward financial aid instead. Students from wealthy families can pay full price, Rose said, and students from low-income families can receive financial aid. But the students in the middle can get caught in the gap between being able to afford college and qualifying for need-based financial aid, said Rose, who also is chairman of the New Jersey Presidents' Council, an organization of the state's college and university presidents.
NEWS
May 26, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rowan University in Glassboro counts its engineering program as one of its premiere academic programs and has aggressive goals to expand enrollment. A few miles away, in nearby Deptford, Rowan College at Gloucester County is working to grow its own engineering science program, potentially doubling the number of freshmen in the pre-baccalaureate program in just two years. With both Rowan schools in Gloucester County looking to expand - and cut into a piece of the state's notorious annual "brain drain" of college students - school officials signed an agreement last week to align their engineering programs and create a road map for transfer.
NEWS
April 12, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the department store where he was a manager closed, Edward Hamburg, then in his early 50s, went back to school. "He had always wanted to go into education," his wife, Jeannine, said, but after he earned his bachelor's degree, his parents pressed him to continue working at their dry-goods store in Paulsboro. With his career in family and corporate retail behind him, Mr. Hamburg began a teaching career by earning a master's in education at Rutgers University in New Brunswick.
NEWS
January 6, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
With New Jersey continuing its notorious "brain drain" export of more than 30,000 college students every year, much of the focus in higher education in 2014 remained on expansion: breaking ground on new academic buildings, increasing housing options at the state's public colleges, and offering new ways to obtain degrees. There also were leadership changes, a new name for one community college and - of course - political battles. Here's a look back at some of the changes in the higher education landscape last year: 1. Stockton buys Showboat Stockton College made clear it had no plan to stop its explosive growth with the high-profile purchase of the shuttered Showboat Atlantic City, which will house a campus in the resort.
NEWS
December 28, 2014 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
A little more than three years ago, Rich Bolds saw the future of Timber Creek basketball sitting in the school's lunch room. His name was Dikemba Amugo. He was a freshman who had never played the game in his life. "I told him, 'If you work hard, by the time you leave here, you're going to be one of the best shot-blockers and scorers to ever play here,' " Bolds said. On Friday night, Amugo showed just how far he has come - and just how prophetic his coach was that day in the fall of 2011.
NEWS
December 19, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Henry M. Rowan Family Foundation will donate $15 million to the engineering school at Rowan University, the second-largest gift in the Glassboro school's history, the school announced Wednesday. The money will create a permanent endowment for the engineering school, which will be renamed the Henry M. Rowan College of Engineering. "It goes to our foundation and gets invested, and we are going to receive proceeds from this annually forever," said Ali A. Houshmand, the university's president.
NEWS
December 10, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Caitlyn Ricci and her parents sat on opposite sides of the Camden courtroom, emblematic of a deep family divide. On the right was Ricci, 21, wearing a solid green shirt and black dress pants, with her attorney. On the left side, seated together, were her divorced parents: middle school English teacher Maura McGarvey and varsity high school basketball coach Michael Ricci, joined by each of their attorneys. Superior Court Judge Thomas Shusted Jr. implored both sides - who have fought more than a year over who should pay Caitlyn Ricci's college tuition - to stop bickering.
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