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NEWS
August 11, 2016
By Dotty Brown This week, as 20 U.S oarswomen compete in Rio alongside the men, they might give thanks to the Philadelphia women who decades ago struggled against the current of their time to win the right to row, long after they had won the right to vote. The effort came in waves, starting in 1938 when the first competitive women's rowing club in the country, the Philadelphia Girls' Rowing Club, landed a berth on the Schuylkill only because Ernestine Bayer had been tipped off at her banking job that the Philadelphia Skating Club was moving out to Ardmore.
NEWS
May 23, 2016
In the wake of thousands of collegiate student athletes converging on the Schuylkill last weekend for the 2016 Dad Vail Regatta, consider the story of the Philadelphia Girls' Rowing Club, the oldest organization of its kind in the country. The development of American athletics is intimately connected to the history of competitive rowing. It was not on a diamond, court, or gridiron that the first intercollegiate sport was contested. Instead, it was on the nation's (calmer) rivers, and Philadelphia's connections to rowing are fathoms deep.
NEWS
September 11, 1987 | By Susan Caba, Inquirer Staff Writer
Antal Bocsardy back-paddled from an algae-covered inlet of the Schuylkill into the early evening light on the river, oblivious to the heron wheeling overhead, the thin wisps of cloud and the other scullers. He would return an hour later, sweat-soaked, his shirt tucked behind his seat. Struggling up from the double-keeled boat, he accepted help into his wheelchair, but insisted on powering himself up the steep concrete ramp to the boathouse. "Please, that's the exercise of it," he said, declining a hand.
SPORTS
October 28, 2013 | By Mike Still, For The Inquirer
For the spectators camped along the Schuylkill cheering on competitors in the 43d annual Head of the Schuylkill Regatta on Saturday, the frigid winds blowing off the water required a few extra layers of clothing. On the water, however, the strong headwinds required some technical adjustments from rowers. "Every boat out there, they're experiencing the same conditions," said John Pieper, a senior on Drexel's first-place men's college and open heavy championship eights team. ". . . It's just a matter of who can handle the conditions better, who's willing to sit in the pain and push through it for longer.
SPORTS
May 13, 2011 | By JEFF JANICZEK, janiczje@phillynews.com
WITH EIGHT men working in unison to overcome that next challenge, rowing might be the ultimate team sport, and no one knows this better than Saint Joseph's Chase Powell. Less than 2 months after losing his mother to cancer, the senior rower will rejoin his teammates on the Schuylkill this weekend to compete in the prestigious Aberdeen Dad Vail Regatta for the fourth time in his college career. "I told my coach that I wanted to be there for the team in any way possible," Powell said.
SPORTS
July 10, 1987 | By Sarajane Freligh, Inquirer Staff Writer
David Krmpotich's first rowing coach was a man named Henning E. Peterson, whom everybody just called Pete. By the early 1970s, Peterson's Olympic dream had long since eluded him, but it never quite died. The dream was his legacy to his oarsmen. Pete taught his boys at the Duluth (Minn.) Rowing Club to row on tired old hydraulic machines that were, like himself, remnants of a decade when the Duluth Boat Club and its oarsmen were kings of the city. Peterson rowed on the senior eight that the Duluth Boat Club planned to send to the 1920 Olympic Trials, but he fell ill and lost his seat.
NEWS
June 6, 1988 | By RON AVERY, Daily News Staff Writer
WANTED: Women, athletic and adventuresome, to join virile, semi-serious Irish-American oarsmen for cruises off the scenic coast of Camden. Apply first Thursday of each month, 7:30 p.m. Irish Pub, 1123 Walnut St., Phila. The gentlemen of the Philadelphia Celtic Curragh Club are in agreement: A few good oarswmomen would really get the fledgling club moving. "Yeah, we're very anxious to recruit some women," says team manager Bob Doordan. "It makes it interesting to have mixed crew races.
SPORTS
August 1, 2006 | By Ray Parrillo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
J.B. Kelly was entertaining guests at the Vesper Boat Club last week when he paused to describe the sad state of the venerable boathouse before the completion of recent restorations. "The foundations along one side had sunk 12 inches," said Kelly, president of the club and the grandson of John B. Kelly, who remains the most famous name in Philadelphia rowing more than eight decades after winning three Olympic gold medals. "You didn't have to have beer to feel you were tipsy," Kelly said.
NEWS
January 16, 1994 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
On the west edge of town, not far from the hustle and bustle of the County Courthouse, lies an oasis of sorts known as Broomall's Lake. The quiet stillness that settles over the pristine lake property this time of year - with its silvery trees, clubhouse and dock - belies a rich history that has surrounded the site. The lake has hosted Olympic swimmers, drawn large crowds for its Fourth of July events, lured youth in the search of a swimming or fishing hole and attracted ladies and gentlemen in their Sunday best for a rowing jaunt.
NEWS
February 17, 1989 | By Ginny Wiegand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Diane DeLuca has done just about everything at the Vesper Boat Club on Boathouse Row. A former officer and board member, she's also set up parties, swept the floors, scrubbed the locker rooms, sorted the mail, written thank-you notes and, in her words, "picked hairballs out of the shower. " Now, she is the president of the venerable club along the Schuylkill, the first woman to hold that position in Vesper's 124-year history. Last night, friends and fellow rowers held an informal reception for her at the club's Jack Kelly Memorial Boathouse, named for one of its most famous members.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 11, 2016
By Dotty Brown This week, as 20 U.S oarswomen compete in Rio alongside the men, they might give thanks to the Philadelphia women who decades ago struggled against the current of their time to win the right to row, long after they had won the right to vote. The effort came in waves, starting in 1938 when the first competitive women's rowing club in the country, the Philadelphia Girls' Rowing Club, landed a berth on the Schuylkill only because Ernestine Bayer had been tipped off at her banking job that the Philadelphia Skating Club was moving out to Ardmore.
NEWS
May 23, 2016
In the wake of thousands of collegiate student athletes converging on the Schuylkill last weekend for the 2016 Dad Vail Regatta, consider the story of the Philadelphia Girls' Rowing Club, the oldest organization of its kind in the country. The development of American athletics is intimately connected to the history of competitive rowing. It was not on a diamond, court, or gridiron that the first intercollegiate sport was contested. Instead, it was on the nation's (calmer) rivers, and Philadelphia's connections to rowing are fathoms deep.
NEWS
June 1, 2014 | By Tim McManus, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sheila Bridges raised her megaphone and called out over the din of her outboard motor. The coach of the Whitemarsh Boat Club had spotted one of her junior rowers doing something she did not like. "You're pulling with your fingers!" Bridges yelled. Across the open river, Emma Holt opened her palms to show a pair of angry red blisters. Unlike most of the rowers buzzing about the waters of the upper Schuylkill earlier this month, Holt was not suffering in service of her school. The Stotesbury Regatta was days away, but she would not be competing.
SPORTS
October 28, 2013 | By Mike Still, For The Inquirer
For the spectators camped along the Schuylkill cheering on competitors in the 43d annual Head of the Schuylkill Regatta on Saturday, the frigid winds blowing off the water required a few extra layers of clothing. On the water, however, the strong headwinds required some technical adjustments from rowers. "Every boat out there, they're experiencing the same conditions," said John Pieper, a senior on Drexel's first-place men's college and open heavy championship eights team. ". . . It's just a matter of who can handle the conditions better, who's willing to sit in the pain and push through it for longer.
SPORTS
July 9, 2013 | By Tyler R. Tynes, Inquirer Staff Writer
On a sweltering summer day on the Schuylkill, the Vesper Rowing Club captured the Mariner Points Trophy Sunday at the Independence Day Regatta. Vesper won the women's eight final en route to a dominant showing in the points race. The champions finished with 522.75 points; runner-up Penn A.C. had 291. "This is where we want to be: We want to be a power in rowing again," said Joanne Iverson, president of the Vesper Rowing Club, which is based on Kelly Drive along the Schuylkill.
SPORTS
May 13, 2011 | By JEFF JANICZEK, janiczje@phillynews.com
WITH EIGHT men working in unison to overcome that next challenge, rowing might be the ultimate team sport, and no one knows this better than Saint Joseph's Chase Powell. Less than 2 months after losing his mother to cancer, the senior rower will rejoin his teammates on the Schuylkill this weekend to compete in the prestigious Aberdeen Dad Vail Regatta for the fourth time in his college career. "I told my coach that I wanted to be there for the team in any way possible," Powell said.
NEWS
May 9, 2008 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As she does nearly every day in good weather, Hilary Armstrong pushed off from a dock on the Schuylkill and used her powerful arms, legs and torso to begin rowing her four-person boat. That in itself is a miracle. Four years ago, doctors told her she wouldn't be able to row after her car hydroplaned on a slick road and hit a telephone pole, rock and tree, leaving her with three shattered vertebrae, fractured ribs and a collapsed lung. But today and tomorrow, Armstrong, 21, will set the pace for her St. Joseph's University varsity four in the Dad Vail Regatta after powering back from her near-crippling injuries.
NEWS
May 9, 2008 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
As she does nearly every day in good weather, Hilary Armstrong pushed off from a dock on the Schuylkill and used her powerful arms, legs and torso to begin rowing her four-person boat. That in itself is a miracle. Four years ago, doctors told her she wouldn't be able to row after her car hydroplaned on a slick road and hit a telephone pole, rock and tree, leaving her with three shattered vertebrae, fractured ribs and a collapsed lung. But today and tomorrow, Armstrong, 21, will set the pace for her St. Joseph's University varsity four in the Dad Vail Regatta after powering back from her near-crippling injuries.
SPORTS
August 1, 2006 | By Ray Parrillo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
J.B. Kelly was entertaining guests at the Vesper Boat Club last week when he paused to describe the sad state of the venerable boathouse before the completion of recent restorations. "The foundations along one side had sunk 12 inches," said Kelly, president of the club and the grandson of John B. Kelly, who remains the most famous name in Philadelphia rowing more than eight decades after winning three Olympic gold medals. "You didn't have to have beer to feel you were tipsy," Kelly said.
NEWS
May 7, 2006 | By Kerry O'Connor FOR THE INQUIRER
When the eight women in the South Jersey Rowing Club's top boat are in sync, the blades on their oars drop into the water at the same time, swiftly pulling them down the Cooper River. It looks effortless and beautiful. From the banks, anyway. "I have some blisters," Devon Mitchell said as she examined her hands before a recent afternoon practice. Like all rowers, the 17-year-old Shawnee High School senior wraps athletic tape around her calloused mitts to protect them. "It looks bad, but it's just a part of rowing.
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