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SPORTS
November 14, 1987 | By M. G. Missanelli, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the myriad possibilities surrounding the wild-card slot in the Philadelphia Public League football playoffs, Dobbins coach Robert Smith's focus was on one thing yesterday. "Winning," said Smith. "We knew if we won, we were in. We didn't want to back in after losing. " And win Dobbins did. The Mustangs defeated Roxborough, 18-8, to capture their first Mid-City Division title since 1979. The victory puts Dobbins into the playoffs, where it will meet West Division champ Bok, at Northeast High, at 1 p.m. next Saturday.
NEWS
January 13, 1994 | by Anthony S. Twyman, Daily News Staff Writer
Every time Jesse Wenk looks at the quarter-inch-wide cracks in his walls, he's reminded of it. Every time he sees that his front steps have pulled farther away from his Roxborough home, he can't escape it. Wenk's house on Pensdale Street near Freeland Avenue is sinking. Unbeknown to Wenk, his house, which dates from the 1920s, was built on a former pharmaceutical company dump that was covered over with ash. The ash is now shifting, causing his house to sink. Before long he will have to move.
NEWS
June 14, 1989 | By Gwen Knapp, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the first time since 1985, the Washington Eagles will not be the Public League baseball championship game. On Monday afternoon at Central High, with two outs in the top of the seventh inning, Washington watched a 5-4 lead over Roxborough, and its hopes for a fifth straight title, disappear. "It hurts," Washington coach Joe O'Hara said after Roxborough rallied for a 7-5 semifinal victory. "There's no question it hurts. But to a certain extent, I'm relieved because now we can start all over.
NEWS
September 22, 1995 | by Yvonne Latty, Daily News Staff Writer
It's been 10 years and lots of letters, but still no final answer as to whether 202 apartments will be built in Roxborough. Residents and developers have yet to meet, and the planning board won't make a decision until they do. Each side blames the other. "I have never had a problem with meeting with a community," said Carl Primavera, an attorney for the Andorra Group, which wants to build six apartment buildings at Umbria Street and Shawmont Avenue. "Usually they are anxious to hear us and anxious to give input.
NEWS
May 12, 1988 | By Pete Schnatz, Special to The Inquirer
If Larry Kolongowski's latest pitching performance was listed as a lunchtime item at a nearby deli, it would probably be a roast beef sandwich on rye bread. Make that month-old rye. After the senior righthander got much-needed last-out relief from teammate Ken Mulderrig to preserve Washington's 7-4 win over visiting Roxborough (4-3 league) on Monday, all Kolongowski wanted to remember about his outing were innings two through six. Throw away the first and seventh and you're left with some quality filler.
SPORTS
November 9, 1991 | By Pete Schnatz, Special to The Inquirer
Gerald "Scotty" Mack left yesterday's Public League Division B showdown at Central with less uniform than he started with, but the Roxborough running back never looked better. The 5-foot-7, 155-pound senior rushed for 232 yards and two touchdowns as Roxborough clinched a playoff berth with a 29-0 thrashing of the Lancers. The victory puts Roxborough (6-2 overall, 4-1 league) into a quarterfinal game at Martin Luther King, the Division C champion, on Friday. Mack began the day with three blue letters (M-A-C)
SPORTS
June 9, 1990 | By Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
The Public League baseball schedule-maker was not exactly kind to Mike Miller's right arm. Humane, yes. But not kind. Before yesterday, when Roxborough bested Central, 12-5, in a semifinal at Northeast, Miller had pitched four innings in the 17 previous days. No wonder he had trouble finding a groove. No wonder his five-inning stint was largely lackluster. "Our last regular-season game, against Edison, was so long ago (May 21)," said Miller, a 6-1, 165-pound senior righthander and Temple signee.
SPORTS
November 24, 2006 | By Rick O'Brien INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After last week's loss to La Salle in the Catholic League Red Division semifinals, Roman Catholic was determined to avoid similar frustration in yesterday's Thanksgiving Day clash with Roxborough. Troy Richardson did his part, catching seven passes for 138 yards and two touchdowns as the Cahillites defeated the host Indians, 19-6, on a muddy and puddle-filled field. "We really wanted to end the season on a good note," said Richardson, a senior wide receiver and cornerback.
NEWS
June 13, 1990 | By Kevin L. Carter, Inquirer Staff Writer
Roxborough, with its 4-3 defeat of Washington on Monday afternoon, won its second consecutive Public League baseball title, but what Washington shortstop Tom Honda won at the Frankford site of the game was respect. In the bottom of the seventh inning, with the Indians up by a run and Ray Barnhart - representing the tying run - on second base, Roxborough coach Cliff Hubbard did the unthinkable. He instructed pitcher Mike Miller to walk Honda. Intentionally. This decision put the winning run on first and placed the bat in the hands of Jeff Strunk.
SPORTS
October 6, 1990 | By Ted Silary, Daily News Sports Writer
Whenever Derrik Millhouse needs football pointers, he turns in so many directions, his head nearly spins off. Derrik's father, Walter, and uncle, Roger, starred at Germantown. Two more uncles, James and Anthony, were prominent players at Gratz. A cousin, Kevin, was a linebacking force at King. "My uncle Anthony played for Temple," Derrik said, "and they all played semipro. Some people thought Anthony would make it big. Now, I'm going to try to be the first. " Yesterday, Millhouse, a 6-3, 210-pound junior quarterback (and part-time cornerback)
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NEWS
May 3, 2016
Boy killed, 8 injured in Roxborough crash A young boy was killed and eight other people - including a baby girl - were injured in a Sunday afternoon vehicle crash in Roxborough. Police said the boy, about 6 years old, was pronounced dead shortly after the two-vehicle accident at Henry Avenue and Hermit Lane. Authorities declined to identify the boy. The baby and a man were critically injured in the 4 p.m. accident, but police said their condition was stable. They said the others were less seriously injured.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2016 | By Matt Soniak, For The Inquirer
"Aw, he's kind of cute," someone says as a toad stumbles out of the brush and onto the pavement. A few of us gather round and conclude that he (or she, we don't pry) is, in fact, pretty adorable. Love is in the air in Roxborough near the Schuylkill Center for Environmental Education, but the dozen or so people slowly walking up and down a stretch of Port Royal Avenue one March evening aren't looking for frogs to kiss, hoping they'll turn into princes. They're helping the local toads - whose mating season has just started - get from one side of the street to the other, where they'll hopefully mingle with one another in the Roxborough Reservoir and make more little toads.
SPORTS
April 14, 2016 | By David Murphy, DAILY NEWS COLUMNIST
On an April night in 1973, a kid from Roxborough stood in front of the Spectrum and listened to a muffled roar explode through its walls. He did not go in. Could not go in, really. Hell, they couldn't even watch it on TV. They were Roxborough kids, the sons of machinists, of factory foremen, of Marine Corps vets who returned from Korea and spent the rest of their lives cobbling together a living on the ground floor of the industrial complex that enabled such entanglements. Funny how it works: You risk your life to protect the capital, you manufacture the material to construct the building, and then you stand outside and listen to the crowd.
NEWS
February 26, 2016
A person was killed Wednesday afternoon in a house fire in the city's Roxborough section, authorities said. The fire was reported at 2:15 p.m. in the 300 block of Krams Avenue. Firefighters declared the scene under control 15 minutes later. No information was immediately available on the victim. The American Red Cross of Eastern Pennsylvania sent volunteers to the location to provide assistance, a spokesman said. - Robert Moran
BUSINESS
February 26, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Aetna and Roxborough Memorial Hospital have reached a three-year deal that brought the hospital into the Aetna network for the first time since 2012, the insurance company said Wednesday. The contract was effective Feb. 1, Aetna said. Roxborough is a 137-bed hospital owned by Prime Healthcare Services Inc., a California for-profit that also owns Lower Bucks Hospital, a 150-bed facility in Bristol Township. An affilated foundation, Prime Healthcare Foundation recently completed its purchase of the former Mercy Suburban Hospital in East Norriton.
NEWS
February 25, 2016 | By Jan Hefler, Staff Writer
The dented mess kit of a soldier from Roxborough who fought in a bloody battle in Normandy came home Tuesday, 72 years after it was lost on French soil. About 40 relatives of Hudson Leroy Funk, including great-grandchildren and his 95-year-old brother, hugged and proudly passed the mess kit around a kitchen table in Medford after hearing how a World War II memorabilia collector had found it last fall, using a metal detector. Funk, who lost his legs later, in a battle in Luxembourg in November 1944, had carved his initials - HLF - into the metal container.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
High above the Schuylkill, in the Ridge Park section of Roxborough, old millworker houses sit side by side with wood-trimmed Victorian mansions. The little houses are jammed together as tightly as crayons in a box, but they typically sit back from the street, often behind postage-stamp gardens, and many have snug porches or high stoops. The streets, still paved in red and yellow brick, rise steeply, and thick woods carpet the slopes behind the houses. It's just 10 miles from Center City, but it might be a small town in Pennsylvania.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sometimes as a youngster in the small Kenyan village where his family farmed, Abraham Kiprop Rutto would look up toward the clear sky and see a passing airplane. Though his future figured to be as earthbound as his father's, the boy dreamed that one day such a plane would carry him to strange new lands, no small ambition for a rural African youngster. Soon he found a way. "My friends were running and going abroad in planes," Rutto said. "And I said, 'I want to fly in one and go abroad so I will run too.' " Rutto ran so hard he eventually caught up with his dream.
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