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Roxy Music

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NEWS
July 21, 2001 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
In interviews to promote Roxy Music's first tour in 17 years, lead singer Bryan Ferry and guitarist Phil Manzanera both marveled at the demand for a reunion and spoke of the "goodwill" they felt from fans. Apparently not much of that affection emanated from the Philadelphia area: There were many empty seats under the canopy at Thursday's Tweeter Center show, and only a few hearty souls on the vast lawn. It may have been billed as an "event," but the show felt more like a greatest-hits cash grab, with only scattered moments of brilliance amid uninspired renditions of new-wave gems long past their sell-by date.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1994 | By Ann Kolson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cool and elegant, he reclines on the bed in the chic hotel; he is a study in black and white. But don't be fooled by the languid pose. "Apart from finding me rather tired and jaded, I'm actually full of beans at the moment," says British musician Bryan Ferry at the end of a long day. The moody Mamouna, his first album of original material since 1987's Bete Noire, will be released tomorrow. More artist than singer - a pop auteur, really - Ferry has been known throughout his long career for his silky voice, suave demeanor and insidiously seductive tunes.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1999 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
Since the start of Roxy Music, Bryan Ferry has existed in another time zone, a Casablanca-like sector where the past and future are interchangeable. There, the decaying sounds of Germanic cabaret, English avant rock, and standard American jazz mingle, with Ferry in the role of the last of the international playboys. At least, that's the impression he gave Thursday night at the nearly sold-out Gershman Auditorium - a most appropriate ballroom venue, with an appropriately dressed crowd - when he moved elegantly between Tin Pan Alley standards, solo hits, and Roxy favorites.
NEWS
August 3, 1988 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
Professorial passion gleams in the eyes of rocker Bryan Ferry as he describes how he's been coaching the members of his new band. He is finished with the business of notes and musical entrances, he says, like a conductor after a rehearsal, and now he's fine-tuning. "I am explaining myself a lot," Ferry is saying during an interview last week at his record company's New York offices. "The band is good because they know they can do things differently from the record, once they have the overall feeling in mind.
NEWS
August 6, 1988 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
Before British rocker Bryan Ferry and his nine-piece band emerged from behind a curtain at the Tower Theater Friday, the soup had begun to heat up: Eerily hollow sounds rolled from the speakers and the bass began to rumble, accompanying the play of light and shadows across the stage front. By the time Ferry made his entrance, dressed in a loose-fitting dark suit and tie, the lightly funky, percussively exotic "Limbo" was simmering. With slight waves of his hands and the demeanor of a conductor, Ferry stirred the cauldron delicately, and he didn't let up for over an hour.
NEWS
April 22, 1988 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
Though they've released five albums here, Australia's Icehouse is still considered an "up-and-comer" act in the United States. Either they headline at 3,000-seat halls like the Tower (where they appear tonight with Men Without Hats), or they open arena shows for bigger bands like the recently crashed Cars, with whom Icehouse toured to the bitter end late last year. At home, however, Icehouse has become the hottest thing in Australian rock. The band's earnest, melodic, Euro-pop flavored "Man of Colors" LP clung tenaciously to the Aussie album chart's No. 1 slot for more than three months.
NEWS
May 8, 2005 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Foxy Brown, who faces assault and harassment charges for allegedly punching and kicking two New York nail-salon workers in an Aug. 29 altercation, rejected a plea Friday that would have kept her out of jail. Brown's lawyer said the 25-year-old rapper will not agree to any deal that involves admitting to a crime. Joseph Tacopina said the deal was "normally a good one, but she's not guilty. " At an earlier court date, Brown explained the fight: "I got the pedicure, but they didn't give me the manicure," but charged her for both.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1989 | By John Milward, Special to The Inquirer
David Bowie has always acted as if artistic roots could be changed as easily as hair color. So it's only appropriate that Bowie's pop celebrity has always depended as much on visual imagery as on musical accomplishment. A dandy can color his hair and religiously touch up those pesky roots. Similarly, a musician can draw from new models to change his style with little regard for how it connects to what came before. Sound + Vision, a 46-song retrospective that kicks off Rykodisc's re- release of Bowie's 18-album RCA catalogue, offers a primer in what made Bowie arguably the most influential pop artist of the '70s.
NEWS
January 2, 2001 | by Regina Medina, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
QUOTE "I'm going to miss Bill Clinton. And I don't mean only in a selfish 'He was great for late-night comedians' way. . .I'm going to miss him the way you miss Christmas on a dark February morning. " - "Late Night" host Conan O'Brien on the end of White House comic material in Time magazine. You'll need your shades to watch the breakup of the Janet Jackson-Rene Elizondo Jr. union - their pearly-white fangs are starting to show. Elizondo, secretly married to the singer-dancer-actress for nine years, filed a $10 million lawsuit Friday in Los Angeles Superior Court claiming she broke a promise to divvy up goodies acquired before their '91 marriage.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2010
Pop Come Around Sundown (RCA . ) Arena rock and ambivalence: Not perfect together. The Kings of Leon's fourth album, 2008's Only by the Night , built the Southern alt-rock band consisting of four Followills - brothers Caleb, Nathan and Jared, with their cousin Matthew - a mass audience on the strength of the convulsive hits "Sex On Fire" and "Use Somebody," the latter the surprise winner as Record of the Year at the 2010 Grammy awards....
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NEWS
November 18, 2012
Pop Christina Aguilera Lotus (RCA **1/2) There are vocalists whose every utterance is an unqualified thing of beauty. They could sing the phone book and make it sound as heavenly as the Bible. Christina Aguilera has that force - a voice with dynamic highs that could shatter glass-block, lows that could tear tar from the streets, lustrous subtlety that provokes tears. The problem is that sometimes, after several phone books, it's hard to get excited by sheer beauty alone.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Beyoncé baby brouhaha has so spiraled out of control, it's sucked in New York's Mayor Bloomberg . The p.r. stink bomb went off when civilians complained that B. and hub Jay-Z received such VIP treatment at Lenox Hill Hospital last week for the birth of their daughter, Blue Ivy , that the regular folk weren't able to see their own newborns. Seems an entire wing of the hospital was closed off by Jay-Z's bodyguards. The power couple paid to have the area refurbished a month ago, when workers tore down six to eight rooms and turned them into two suites with mahogany walls, an unnamed source tells Us Weekly.
NEWS
November 1, 2005 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Martha Stewart and Donald Trump, whose egos will someday be enshrined in the Lincoln Memorial - is it big enough? - have been exchanging verbal salvos. That's either because they're bored or are looking to create hype for their highly respected but decidedly flagging reality-TV shows. Speaking to Fortune mag, the domestic diva turned stay-at-home convict turned despotic-reality-TV-goddess says she thought her NBC show, The Apprentice: Martha Stewart would replace The Donald's original Apprentice.
NEWS
May 8, 2005 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Foxy Brown, who faces assault and harassment charges for allegedly punching and kicking two New York nail-salon workers in an Aug. 29 altercation, rejected a plea Friday that would have kept her out of jail. Brown's lawyer said the 25-year-old rapper will not agree to any deal that involves admitting to a crime. Joseph Tacopina said the deal was "normally a good one, but she's not guilty. " At an earlier court date, Brown explained the fight: "I got the pedicure, but they didn't give me the manicure," but charged her for both.
NEWS
July 21, 2001 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
In interviews to promote Roxy Music's first tour in 17 years, lead singer Bryan Ferry and guitarist Phil Manzanera both marveled at the demand for a reunion and spoke of the "goodwill" they felt from fans. Apparently not much of that affection emanated from the Philadelphia area: There were many empty seats under the canopy at Thursday's Tweeter Center show, and only a few hearty souls on the vast lawn. It may have been billed as an "event," but the show felt more like a greatest-hits cash grab, with only scattered moments of brilliance amid uninspired renditions of new-wave gems long past their sell-by date.
NEWS
January 2, 2001 | by Regina Medina, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
QUOTE "I'm going to miss Bill Clinton. And I don't mean only in a selfish 'He was great for late-night comedians' way. . .I'm going to miss him the way you miss Christmas on a dark February morning. " - "Late Night" host Conan O'Brien on the end of White House comic material in Time magazine. You'll need your shades to watch the breakup of the Janet Jackson-Rene Elizondo Jr. union - their pearly-white fangs are starting to show. Elizondo, secretly married to the singer-dancer-actress for nine years, filed a $10 million lawsuit Friday in Los Angeles Superior Court claiming she broke a promise to divvy up goodies acquired before their '91 marriage.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1999 | By A.D. Amorosi, FOR THE INQUIRER
Since the start of Roxy Music, Bryan Ferry has existed in another time zone, a Casablanca-like sector where the past and future are interchangeable. There, the decaying sounds of Germanic cabaret, English avant rock, and standard American jazz mingle, with Ferry in the role of the last of the international playboys. At least, that's the impression he gave Thursday night at the nearly sold-out Gershman Auditorium - a most appropriate ballroom venue, with an appropriately dressed crowd - when he moved elegantly between Tin Pan Alley standards, solo hits, and Roxy favorites.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1994 | By Ann Kolson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Cool and elegant, he reclines on the bed in the chic hotel; he is a study in black and white. But don't be fooled by the languid pose. "Apart from finding me rather tired and jaded, I'm actually full of beans at the moment," says British musician Bryan Ferry at the end of a long day. The moody Mamouna, his first album of original material since 1987's Bete Noire, will be released tomorrow. More artist than singer - a pop auteur, really - Ferry has been known throughout his long career for his silky voice, suave demeanor and insidiously seductive tunes.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1989 | By John Milward, Special to The Inquirer
David Bowie has always acted as if artistic roots could be changed as easily as hair color. So it's only appropriate that Bowie's pop celebrity has always depended as much on visual imagery as on musical accomplishment. A dandy can color his hair and religiously touch up those pesky roots. Similarly, a musician can draw from new models to change his style with little regard for how it connects to what came before. Sound + Vision, a 46-song retrospective that kicks off Rykodisc's re- release of Bowie's 18-album RCA catalogue, offers a primer in what made Bowie arguably the most influential pop artist of the '70s.
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