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Roy Halladay

NEWS
May 30, 2012 | By Marc Narducci, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
NEW YORK - The Phillies on Tuesday placed star righthander Roy Halladay on the disabled list retroactive to Monday with a strained muscle in his right shoulder and back. The injury could keep him out of the lineup for up to two months. Halladay strained his latissimus dorsi, the team said. That muscle is defined by the Oxford Dictionary of Sports Science and Medicine as the broad back muscle that swings the arm backward and rotates it inward. Phillies assistant general manager Scott Proefrock said that Halladay will be shut down a minimum of three weeks and that the team hopes to have him back pitching in six to eight weeks.
SPORTS
September 23, 2012 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Roy Halladay did not watch his 89-m.p.h. fastball fly Saturday when everything crumbled. An 8-2 Phillies loss to Atlanta was five batters old at crestfallen Citizens Bank Park. The silence was interrupted when that fastball, now a three-run Braves homer, smacked a large advertisement in right field. Bang. Only then did Halladay turn his head. It was difficult not to stare. Halladay threw 51 pitches, recorded five outs, and was charged with seven runs. Those images were later replaced by a somber Halladay verbalizing failure inside the Phillies clubhouse.
SPORTS
May 9, 2013 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
SAN FRANCISCO - A week from his 36th birthday, Roy Halladay sat in a doctor's office in Los Angeles and couldn't escape wondering about his future. Halladay was examined by Dr. Neal ElAttrache at the offices of Dr. Lewis Yocum yesterday, a day after being placed on the 15-day disabled list with right shoulder inflammation. Before last night's game in San Francisco, the Phillies said there would be no update on Halladay's test results until today. And so, they wait. "I expect to hear something before we go home tonight," said a hopeful Charlie Manuel.
SPORTS
September 22, 2012 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Staff Writer
This has been a season in which the Phillies have seen nearly everything, and now, after Roy Halladay left the mound at Citizens Bank Park to scattered boos on Saturday afternoon, they have heard everything as well. Halladay may have not deserved better from the game itself - he took little of his traditional arsenal to the mound with him - but he deserved at least a better last memory from what should really be his final appearance of the season. After the game, Halladay said he has experienced spasms behind his shoulder recently, but also said he would prefer to work through those issues and take his final two starts of the season.
SPORTS
April 5, 2013 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
ATLANTA - It is an obituary nobody wants to write, and only Roy Halladay can prevent it from being written. He forced us all to sharpen our pencils Wednesday night. If the question before this start was whether Halladay would be closer to his vintage self now that the games count, it is now this: If he isn't going to be that pitcher again, can he learn how to be effective in a different way? The guess here is that the answer will turn out to be yes. Halladay is just too competitive, too dedicated to his craft to be daunted by this challenge.
SPORTS
March 25, 2013 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
CLEARWATER, Fla. - The new reality for Roy Halladay started well before 10:59 a.m. Saturday, when he launched an 89 m.p.h. fastball on a back field at the Carpenter Complex. Each time Halladay threw, pitching prospect Jonathan Pettibone clicked the radar-gun trigger. He tilted it so pitching coach Rich Dubee could see the two digits. This happened 81 times Saturday while Blue Jays minor-leaguers smashed Halladay's sinkers and cutters. The first digit of the velocity reading was nine just once or twice.
SPORTS
April 4, 2013 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
ATLANTA - Mind over matter. Stamina over stuff. Brain over brawn. For Roy Halladay, perhaps it won't be all that difficult to continue his evolution as a major league pitcher. He was burned at an early age and rebuilt, in part with an overhaul to his mechanics and in part to the power of positive thinking. If the last 12 months are any indication, Halladay doesn't have the $20 million arm that made him baseball's best pitcher for the majority of the last decade. But he still has the tireless work ethic and meticulous game preparation.
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