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Roy Rogers

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BUSINESS
July 23, 1991 | By Tawn Nhan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most of the Philadelphia area's 141 Roy Rogers restaurants will be sporting a new name and colors and offering a new breakfast menu this fall as a part of the chain's conversion to Hardee's Restaurants. Hardee's Food Systems Inc. bought the Roy Rogers chain from Marriott Corp. in January 1990. The Rocky Mount, N.C., company will spend about $2.5 million to transform the 105 company-owned Roy Rogers restaurants locally into Hardee's. The name and menu changes are voluntary for the area's 36 independently owned Roy Rogers franchises, Tom Coyle, Hardee's vice president and general manager, said yesterday.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1990 | By Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News Wire Services contributed to this report
The Roy Rogers fast-food chain - second largest in the Philadelphia area - is about to be gobbled up by Hardee's. Marriott Corp., which earlier proclaimed its intentions to sell off its food divisions to concentrate on its core hotel business, announced yesterday it has agreed to sell its 600-plus-unit Roy Rogers chain to Hardee's Food Systems Inc. for $365 million. The sale is subject to government review but is expected to be completed by the end of March. There are 129 Roy Rogers restaurants in the Philadelphia area.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1988 | By Gary Thompson, Daily News Staff Writer
On the subject of chicken nuggets, somebody once noted that no chicken part is shaped like a nugget, and, if chickens did have such parts, we probably wouldn't want to eat them. Today, we are a country that thinks nothing of eating chicken nuggets, no matter where they come from. We like fast food, and we don't care who knows it. Fast food is now a major industry populated with chains like Roy Rogers, which is celebrating its 20th year in the business. In that time, the company proclaims, it has grilled enough burgers to span the earth twice if they were laid end to end. We Philadelphians have eaten enough of them to reach Hawaii.
NEWS
July 7, 1998 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
He didn't smoke. He didn't drink. He didn't spit. He didn't say any curse word stronger than "shucks. " He didn't plug bad guys in the gut. He would shoot the gun out of their hand. Or he beat them up in a fair fight. And then he'd sing. Something like: "Git along, little doggie. " He was Roy Rogers, onetime King of the (Hollywood) Cowboys, who died yesterday at age 86. His death at his home in Apple Valley, Calif., was announced by his spokeswoman, Jane Hansen. He suffered from congestive heart failure, she said.
NEWS
July 7, 1998 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Roy Rogers, the tumbleweed tenor and rhinestone cowboy who sparkled in 87 movies and a beloved 1950s television series, died in his sleep yesterday in Apple Valley, Calif. He was 86, and had been ill with ailments including congestive heart failure. Riding his trusty palomino, Trigger, alongside his co-star, Dale Evans - his wife of 51 years - Rogers typically neutralized the bad guy by shooting the pistol out of his hand. (He was a master of conflict resolution before the term existed.
NEWS
February 12, 2000 | By Stephanie Doster, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The sister of a Warminster woman who was murdered at a Roy Rogers restaurant 16 years ago will receive $675,000 from Marriott Corp. as part of a wrongful death and survival settlement, according to an order released in Bucks County Court yesterday. Terri Lynn Brooks, 25, was finishing her night shift at the fast food restaurant in Fairless Hills on Feb. 4, 1984, when she was beaten, stabbed and strangled. About a year ago, police said that, using DNA technology, they linked evidence from the crime scene to Brooks' fiance, Scott Keefe of Warminster.
NEWS
October 29, 1998 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Although Roy Rogers and Gene Autry have galloped into the setting sun for that last roundup, they remain a presence in cowpoke collectibles. "There's a strong demand remaining for Gene Autry collectibles. Despite his passing, fan interest in our singing cowboy remains strong as ever," said Elvin Sweeten, director of the Gene Autry Center in Gene Autry, Okla. "We have old-time writing tablets from the 1940s and 1950s with Gene's picture on them for $20 and a nice $20 reproduction cowboy movie poster starring Gene," he added.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1986 | By ED VOVES, Special to the Daily News
Roy Rogers and I were pardners in the old days. That was in 1956, when I was a rough-riding 2-year-old and Roy was King of the Cowboys. Back then, everyone on the trail knew that Roy was a clean-living, God- fearing cowpoke. The true dimensions of his spiritual life, however remained a private matter. Unknown, too, was the fact that another cowboy would soon come riding along, a country-born balladeer named Johnny Cash who also would express a deep spirituality. Together, their lives present fascinating case studies of the partnership of religion and entertainment in modern day America.
NEWS
November 4, 1986 | BY GERALD KOLPAN
I read the news today . . . oh boy. And the news told me that, among other events depressing and nasty, Roy Rogers was endorsing Pat Robertson for president. I told some friends that I was heartsick. "You take these things too seriously," they said between bites of croissant. ". . . and anyway, Roy Rogers has always been an arch conservative. I remember reading as how he allowed that they'd have to kill him to take his gun. " "That's not conservative," I shot back. "What else would a cowboy say?"
NEWS
August 9, 1998 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
I remember as though it were only a couple of weeks ago waking up one Saturday morning in 1958 and finding a portable RCA Victor television on our living-room floor - in front of our old Philco table model. My mother had won the portable TV - the size of a Volkswagen Beetle - the night before in a church raffle. ("Surely you gave it back to the good sisters," my father said when told of her prize.) I sat down on the floor and turned it on to its first flickering images of a 24-year-old Shari Lewis cavorting with Lamb Chop, Hush Puppy and Charlie Horse.
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NEWS
February 18, 2001 | By Nita Lelyveld, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Even zooming by on the freeway, it's hard to miss the big palomino, standing tall on his rear hoofs in front of a low-slung log building. He may not mean much to people these days. If they haven't seen the old movies, they may not even recognize a Wild West fort when they see one. But one afternoon last week that statue of a horse named Trigger - to say nothing of "the smartest horse in the movies" himself, stuffed for posterity right nearby - was enough to bring tears to more than one pair of eyes.
NEWS
February 12, 2000 | By Stephanie Doster, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The sister of a Warminster woman who was murdered at a Roy Rogers restaurant 16 years ago will receive $675,000 from Marriott Corp. as part of a wrongful death and survival settlement, according to an order released in Bucks County Court yesterday. Terri Lynn Brooks, 25, was finishing her night shift at the fast food restaurant in Fairless Hills on Feb. 4, 1984, when she was beaten, stabbed and strangled. About a year ago, police said that, using DNA technology, they linked evidence from the crime scene to Brooks' fiance, Scott Keefe of Warminster.
NEWS
October 29, 1998 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Although Roy Rogers and Gene Autry have galloped into the setting sun for that last roundup, they remain a presence in cowpoke collectibles. "There's a strong demand remaining for Gene Autry collectibles. Despite his passing, fan interest in our singing cowboy remains strong as ever," said Elvin Sweeten, director of the Gene Autry Center in Gene Autry, Okla. "We have old-time writing tablets from the 1940s and 1950s with Gene's picture on them for $20 and a nice $20 reproduction cowboy movie poster starring Gene," he added.
NEWS
August 9, 1998 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
I remember as though it were only a couple of weeks ago waking up one Saturday morning in 1958 and finding a portable RCA Victor television on our living-room floor - in front of our old Philco table model. My mother had won the portable TV - the size of a Volkswagen Beetle - the night before in a church raffle. ("Surely you gave it back to the good sisters," my father said when told of her prize.) I sat down on the floor and turned it on to its first flickering images of a 24-year-old Shari Lewis cavorting with Lamb Chop, Hush Puppy and Charlie Horse.
NEWS
July 8, 1998
An age desperate for wholesome heroes just lost one. Roy Rogers, a name today's children may associate more with a roast beef sandwich than the silver screen, died Monday at 86. But for the kids of the '40s and '50s, the "King of the Cowboys" was a Saturday matinee must. They loved his big white hat, his pointed boots and his fancy embroidered shirts. They looked forward to his tenor serenade of the girl rescued from rustlers. On the Double-R-Bar, they adored Trigger, Buttermilk and Bullet.
NEWS
July 7, 1998 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Roy Rogers, the tumbleweed tenor and rhinestone cowboy who sparkled in 87 movies and a beloved 1950s television series, died in his sleep yesterday in Apple Valley, Calif. He was 86, and had been ill with ailments including congestive heart failure. Riding his trusty palomino, Trigger, alongside his co-star, Dale Evans - his wife of 51 years - Rogers typically neutralized the bad guy by shooting the pistol out of his hand. (He was a master of conflict resolution before the term existed.
NEWS
July 7, 1998 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
He didn't smoke. He didn't drink. He didn't spit. He didn't say any curse word stronger than "shucks. " He didn't plug bad guys in the gut. He would shoot the gun out of their hand. Or he beat them up in a fair fight. And then he'd sing. Something like: "Git along, little doggie. " He was Roy Rogers, onetime King of the (Hollywood) Cowboys, who died yesterday at age 86. His death at his home in Apple Valley, Calif., was announced by his spokeswoman, Jane Hansen. He suffered from congestive heart failure, she said.
NEWS
October 26, 1995 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Arlene Knox, gracious and composed, told the jury yesterday that she last saw her husband, Police Officer Charles T. Knox Jr., alive about 3 p.m. on Aug. 30, 1992, at home before he left for work at the First Police District. "He was out front playing with my son, soccer. He came in to say goodbye to us. My son brought him his hat. He had forgot his hat. We kissed him goodbye and he drove off. " At 8:15 p.m., she said she spoke briefly to her husband by telephone. Thirty minutes later, she testified, a police officer came knocking at her door and told her her husband had been shot.
NEWS
October 21, 1995 | by Kurt Heine, Daily News Staff Writer
The brothers accused of killing Philadelphia Police Officer Charles Knox and wounding his partner left fingerprints at the scene of the botched Roy Rogers restaurant stickup and on the murder gun, according to yesterday's testimony in their murder trial. The fingerprints bolster eyewitnesses who saw accused triggerman Tucker Ginn, 35, and crowbar-wielding Allen Ginn, 34, scoop $900 from the restaurant safe on Aug. 30, 1992, and prepare to execute the manager. Officers Knox, 31, and Anthony Howard saved the employees, but were shot point-blank after mistaking the sound of the dropped crowbar for what they thought was the gun falling harmlessly from the killer's hand.
NEWS
October 19, 1995 | By Linda Loyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lamont Pressley said he was the lucky one. He and other Roy Rogers employees were being held at gunpoint when the robber cocked his gun, ready to shoot them. Just then, Philadelphia Police Officer Charles T. Knox Jr., burst in and ordered the gunman to drop his weapon. Pressley, in a voice laden with emotion, told a Common Pleas Court jury yesterday that Knox took the bullet for him. Knox, 31, a two-year police veteran, was killed and his partner, Officer Anthony Howard Jr., was wounded after they arrived during a robbery at a Roy Rogers restaurant in South Philadelphia on Oct. 9, 1992.
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