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November 19, 2012
William Turnbull, 90, a highly regarded British sculptor who drew inspiration from primitive forms, died Thursday, according to the public relations firm Bolton & Quinn, which is promoting a forthcoming show of his work. The cause of death was not announced. Mr. Turnbull's works were frequently extremely simple shapes, suggesting masks or totem poles. He was exhibited at the prestigious Hayward, Serpentine, and Tate Galleries in London and the Berggruen Gallery in San Francisco. British sculptor Anthony Gormley described Mr. Turnbull as "a radical modernist who recognizes that sculpture is of its nature archaic.
NEWS
March 27, 1988 | By Sergio R. Bustos, Inquirer Staff Writer
As far as Gladys Miller of Lawndale is concerned, better late than never. The 60-year-old Englishwoman, who spent more than six years in the Royal Air Force during World War II, recently was bestowed a belated honor by Great Britain's Ministry of Defense. There was no ceremony. Miller received a registered letter March 9 with two medals of honor commemorating her military service. One medal was given for her service in a territory that was subject to constant attack. The other was a war medal, given to all who served during the war. "I was surprised," Miller said.
NEWS
September 18, 2010
John Freeborn, 90, one of the Royal Air Force's leading fighter pilots during World War II and a central figure in a long-remembered episode of "friendly fire," died Aug. 28 in Southport, in northwest England. On Sept. 6, 1939 - three days after Britain had gone to war with Germany - Mr. Freeborn, flying a Spitfire fighter, was among a group of pilots sent aloft to intercept what were reported to be German planes headed toward the Essex coast in southeast England. But there were no German aircraft.
NEWS
May 6, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Paul Williams, 71, of Villas, N.J., who retired in 1989 as assistant fire chief at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, died of lung cancer Wednesday, April 30, at home. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Williams attended what is now West Catholic Preparatory High School but left to help support the family because his father died when he was very young, daughter Wendy Hueftle said. Mr. Williams served a four-year enlistment as an Air Force firefighter, and while stationed at a Royal Air Force base near Sculthorpe in Norfolk, England, he met and married his British wife, Wendy.
NEWS
March 24, 2003 | By Fawn Vrazo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Britons awoke yesterday to yet more sad news. Two Royal Air Force pilots and their Tornado attack jet had been accidentally shot down early yesterday by a U.S. Patriot missile fired from Kuwait as the pilots returned from an apparent bombing mission over Iraq. The two pilots, as yet unidentified, were later confirmed as dead. That meant that in just the last three days, Britain had lost 16 servicemen in the Iraq war, including six killed in a collision between two British helicopters Saturday and eight who died Friday when their single helicopter crashed near Kuwait.
NEWS
December 16, 1990 | By Jim Detjen and Peter Landry, Inquirer Staff Writers
The U.S. Navy has arrested a 20-year-old midshipman in Annapolis who they say attacked and robbed a retired British air force officer last Sunday after the Army-Navy football game, Philadelphia police said last night. Police said that Timothy Chapman of Detroit was arrested Thursday at the Naval Academy after the student offered to sell the officer's $2,000 Rolex watch to a naval intelligence officer. Naval, federal and local authorities have not yet decided in which jurisdiction the student will be tried and no charges have been brought against him, police said.
NEWS
April 29, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
With all the weight of tradition, royal weddings aren't places for new artistic discoveries. Except for this one. Out of the sea of stately rhythms and traditional choral harmonies came a distinctive new work by a composer completely new to me: Paul Mealor. The piece, Ubi Caritas , sung by the choirs of Westminster Abbey and Her Majesty's Chapel Royal, was rooted in Anglican church harmonies but with numerous captivating differences. Immediately, you sensed an individualistic compositional voice was at hand.
NEWS
May 17, 1992 | By Larry Eichel, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Their sons were accidentally killed by American jet pilots, and they, as parents, just wanted an explanation. But as a coroner's inquest into the death of nine British soldiers by "friendly fire" in the Persian Gulf war heard its final witness Friday, they were still waiting - still needing to know how their sons died. All that had been clarified for them, after 15 months of agony and five days of testimony, was the matter of blame. The Americans blame the British air liaison officers.
NEWS
November 14, 1989 | By DOROTHY STORCK
Albert Hodkinson told me to watch for him. He'd be in the second group marching, the one forming at Downing Street behind the first brigade, which was the seriously wounded from World War II. He was tall, he said, and he would be wearing an English cap. He was in London again this year, as he'd come back for so many years, to march in the Remembrance Day parade with - as he put it - "the lads. " Albert Hodkinson, retired engineer and now U.S. citizen living in Philadelphia, was once a navigator in the British Bomber Command, Royal Air Force.
NEWS
November 5, 1986 | By W. Speers, Inquirer Staff Writer (Contributing to this article were the Associated Press, United Press International, USA Today and the New York Times.)
Thomas Jefferson University has gone and done the right thing by Philadelphia's most famous doctor. The Center City medical institution has named Dr. J, Julius Erving, to its board of trustees. "He is known internationall y for his basketball expertise and his community service," board chairman Edward C. Driscoll said of the 76ers star. "We are delighted that he has joined the Jefferson board. " THE ROYAL WATCH The Duchess of York, who has been taking flying lessons for the last month, went solo for the first time yesterday as she piloted a four-seat, light aircraft for seven minutes over a Royal Air Force base in Oxfordshire, England.
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NEWS
May 6, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Paul Williams, 71, of Villas, N.J., who retired in 1989 as assistant fire chief at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, died of lung cancer Wednesday, April 30, at home. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Williams attended what is now West Catholic Preparatory High School but left to help support the family because his father died when he was very young, daughter Wendy Hueftle said. Mr. Williams served a four-year enlistment as an Air Force firefighter, and while stationed at a Royal Air Force base near Sculthorpe in Norfolk, England, he met and married his British wife, Wendy.
NEWS
March 29, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Prince William isn't just a spoiled royal - he's also a genuine 24-karat golden boy who uses his military training, finely honed instincts, and big chops to save ordinary people in distress. So the prince is portrayed in a new documentary on British TV. Helicopter Rescue follows William, or Flight Lt. Wales as he is known in the Royal Air Force, as he flies daring missions as a member of an RAF search-and-rescue squadron. "There's no greater feeling than when you've actually done some good and saved someone's life," the prince, 30, says on camera.
NEWS
November 19, 2012
William Turnbull, 90, a highly regarded British sculptor who drew inspiration from primitive forms, died Thursday, according to the public relations firm Bolton & Quinn, which is promoting a forthcoming show of his work. The cause of death was not announced. Mr. Turnbull's works were frequently extremely simple shapes, suggesting masks or totem poles. He was exhibited at the prestigious Hayward, Serpentine, and Tate Galleries in London and the Berggruen Gallery in San Francisco. British sculptor Anthony Gormley described Mr. Turnbull as "a radical modernist who recognizes that sculpture is of its nature archaic.
NEWS
April 8, 2012 | By Steve Kelly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The ball strike rang pure. A player of my, um, caliber knows that sweet "thwack" because I hear it but a handful of times every round. Sure enough, I found the last of my Top-Flite XLs soaring against a brilliant blue Scottish sky high above the Coffins, a cluster of mean-spirited pot bunkers on the par 4, 388-yard 13th hole at the Old Course St. Andrews Links. In the distance, colorful hang gliders zigzagged over the North Sea in schizophrenic gales that have driven golfers mad for more than 600 years.
NEWS
April 29, 2011 | By David Patrick Stearns, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
With all the weight of tradition, royal weddings aren't places for new artistic discoveries. Except for this one. Out of the sea of stately rhythms and traditional choral harmonies came a distinctive new work by a composer completely new to me: Paul Mealor. The piece, Ubi Caritas , sung by the choirs of Westminster Abbey and Her Majesty's Chapel Royal, was rooted in Anglican church harmonies but with numerous captivating differences. Immediately, you sensed an individualistic compositional voice was at hand.
NEWS
September 18, 2010
John Freeborn, 90, one of the Royal Air Force's leading fighter pilots during World War II and a central figure in a long-remembered episode of "friendly fire," died Aug. 28 in Southport, in northwest England. On Sept. 6, 1939 - three days after Britain had gone to war with Germany - Mr. Freeborn, flying a Spitfire fighter, was among a group of pilots sent aloft to intercept what were reported to be German planes headed toward the Essex coast in southeast England. But there were no German aircraft.
NEWS
September 16, 2008 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Viewers vote: We want Tina Will Tina Fey reprise her smash-hit Saturday Night Live turn as Republican vice-presidential candidate and Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin? Fey isn't saying. Saturday's 5 1/2-minute skit with SNL's Amy Poehler (as Sen. Hillary Clinton) was the highest-rating SNL skit in years, a viral smash on YouTube and many another Web site, and the subject of an outpouring of viewer requests for an encore. But SNL producers and Fey, probably enjoying every moment, are playing it day-to-day.
NEWS
March 24, 2003 | By Fawn Vrazo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Britons awoke yesterday to yet more sad news. Two Royal Air Force pilots and their Tornado attack jet had been accidentally shot down early yesterday by a U.S. Patriot missile fired from Kuwait as the pilots returned from an apparent bombing mission over Iraq. The two pilots, as yet unidentified, were later confirmed as dead. That meant that in just the last three days, Britain had lost 16 servicemen in the Iraq war, including six killed in a collision between two British helicopters Saturday and eight who died Friday when their single helicopter crashed near Kuwait.
NEWS
May 17, 1992 | By Larry Eichel, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Their sons were accidentally killed by American jet pilots, and they, as parents, just wanted an explanation. But as a coroner's inquest into the death of nine British soldiers by "friendly fire" in the Persian Gulf war heard its final witness Friday, they were still waiting - still needing to know how their sons died. All that had been clarified for them, after 15 months of agony and five days of testimony, was the matter of blame. The Americans blame the British air liaison officers.
NEWS
February 7, 1991 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Royal Air Force pilot W. Brian McLarnon had a lifelong habit of watching the skies. "There goes one of ours," he would say every time a plane flew overhead. Mr. McLarnon, 66, of Radnor, died Sunday of a heart attack while vacationing in Hawaii. Born in Belfast, Northern Ireland, Mr. McLarnon was a freshman at Villanova when he volunteered for the RAF in World War II. He was in the RAF's Bomber Command for five years, serving as a pilot and a navigator. After the war, he got his private pilot's license and flew with friends who were training for the Korean War. When Operation Desert Storm began in the Persian Gulf, Mr. McLarnon told family members that he wished he could fly again.
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