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NEWS
August 2, 1987 | By Marc Duvoisin, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Iran and the United States have veered toward confrontation over a U.S. commitment to protect Kuwaiti oil tankers in the Persian Gulf, the British navy has quietly been escorting merchant ships in the waterway without protest or interference from Tehran. Diplomats, maritime-insurance executives and others who monitor attacks on shipping from this key gulf port believe that Pentagon officials could draw some lessons from the British experience as they review their plans in the wake of a mine explosion that damaged a Kuwaiti supertanker as it sailed through the gulf under U.S. protection on July 24. The analysts said that it is partly a matter of luck that none of the 150 ships escorted by the Royal Navy since January has been attacked.
NEWS
February 12, 1994 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
EASY ON THE SALT, GOVERNMENT TELLS MINERS They're the salt of the earth. Especially at this time of the year. They're the anonymous souls who mine the salt that we keep clamoring for in this mother of all winters. And now the government has advised them to be careful not to overdo it. In the absence of warmth and sunshine, many of the nation's rock-salt mines have had to stay open round the clock since early January to keep motorists on track. In January alone, mine operators delivered more than six million tons of rock salt to communities big and small.
NEWS
August 19, 2010
Frank Kermode, 90, a respected critic and Shakespeare scholar, died Tuesday at his home in Cambridge, England. Regarded by some as Britain's foremost critic, he was instrumental in the creation of the London Review of Books, and his accessibility made him a bridge between the donnish world of academic literature and novels read by everyday people (read his work at the review via http://go.philly.com/kermode ) . He was best known for his influential The Sense of an Ending , a witty meditation on the relationship between fiction and crisis.
NEWS
March 19, 1986 | Daily News Wire Services
Queen Elizabeth II announced today that her son Prince Andrew, one of the world's most eligible bachelors, will marry Sarah Ferguson - a commoner whose step-father is an Argentine. The two 26-year-olds are expected to marry in Westminster Abbey in the fall. Notice of the royal engagement was posted at the gates of Buckingham Palace, ending weeks of intense speculation that the prince, who is fourth in line to the British throne, had finally chosen a bride. The announcement said: "It is with the greatest pleasure that the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh announce the betrothal of their beloved son, Prince Andrew, to Miss Sarah Ferguson, daughter of Major Ronald Ferguson and Mrs. Hector Barrantes.
NEWS
January 26, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
It had been rumored for months, but it was confirmed only yesterday: "The duke and duchess of York are very pleased to announce that the duchess is expecting a baby in August," read the single sentence in a statement from Buckingham Palace. The child, the first for Prince Andrew and the former Sarah Ferguson, would be fifth in line to the British throne. A palace spokesman said that Sarah was in excellent health and that the royal family was delighted by the news. Neither Andrew, 27, nor Sarah, 28, was available for comment.
NEWS
March 11, 1988 | Daily News Wire Services
Prince Charles and Prince Andrew saw death strike close to them as separate accidents killed a skiing friend and two helicopter pilots. Charles, the heir to the British throne, left Klosters for home today, after escaping an avalanche which killed a friend and former aide to Queen Elizabeth, Maj. Hugh Lindsay. Elsa Rauch, a doctor who was flown to the scene, said Charles' quick rescue efforts helped save the life of another skiing companion, Patty Palmer- Tomkinson, who was briefly buried in the snow.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2007 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
In "The Water Horse," the mystery of the Loch Ness monster morphs into something that looks a lot like "Free Willy. " It's a boy-and-his-water-pal yarn starring ultra-cute Alex Etel ("Millions") as a Scots lad who finds a mysterious egg on the beach. He takes it home, it hatches, and so does a fairly ambitious story of loss and recovery set in WWII, built around some fairly decent special effects. Little Angus (Etel) is a troubled, lonely kid, isolated on a large estate owned by his father, off serving in the Royal Navy.
NEWS
July 29, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Samuel Relf, 86, of Barrington, a sailor in the Royal Navy during World War II who continued to support his British comrades in the Philadelphia area through his involvement in the local chapter of the Royal British Legion and other veterans organizations, died of a cerebral hemorrhage Thursday, July 22, at AtlantiCare Medical Center in Atlantic City. Mr. Relf, who was born and raised in Sevenoaks, England, traveled all over the world in the navy, his family said. Mostly responsible for setting timers on depth charges and releasing them, he helped sink five German submarines as part of the crew of the frigate Duckworth.
NEWS
July 29, 1986 | BY PETE DEXTER
It occurred to me this morning that I've been over here for the last three or four days, explaining the underlying social contracts that produce a 2,000- year-old society that cannot bake a potato, and that somehow in all the excitement I neglected to tell you about the Royal Family. And so I thought I might pause now, with the Duke and Duchess of York safely cruising the Azores on the royal yacht Britannia, and lay out some of the players, not only to help you remember who is who at the next wedding, but to show you that these are real people behind the titles.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 19, 2012
By Constance Garcia-Barrio Sidelined by election-year politics, the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812 has received relatively little notice. Black Americans' role in the war has claimed less attention still. Yet both the United States and Britain saw blacks, enslaved and free, as a wild card that could help them win. Here in Philadelphia, blacks pitched in to defend the city from a possible British attack. Viewing them as allies meant an about-face for many whites. Blacks figured in the brewing conflict from the start.
NEWS
July 29, 2011 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
With officers in dress whites, a brass quintet, and a color guard, Navy officials in South Philadelphia on Thursday continued a tradition older than the service itself. Inside a former Naval Shipyard ship terminal, Rear Adm. James Shannon presided over a change in leadership at the Navy Ship Systems Engineering Station (NAVSSES) - the core of an installation seen as important to the city's future development. Before about 500 workers and others, command was transferred from Capt.
NEWS
August 19, 2010
Frank Kermode, 90, a respected critic and Shakespeare scholar, died Tuesday at his home in Cambridge, England. Regarded by some as Britain's foremost critic, he was instrumental in the creation of the London Review of Books, and his accessibility made him a bridge between the donnish world of academic literature and novels read by everyday people (read his work at the review via http://go.philly.com/kermode ) . He was best known for his influential The Sense of an Ending , a witty meditation on the relationship between fiction and crisis.
NEWS
July 29, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Samuel Relf, 86, of Barrington, a sailor in the Royal Navy during World War II who continued to support his British comrades in the Philadelphia area through his involvement in the local chapter of the Royal British Legion and other veterans organizations, died of a cerebral hemorrhage Thursday, July 22, at AtlantiCare Medical Center in Atlantic City. Mr. Relf, who was born and raised in Sevenoaks, England, traveled all over the world in the navy, his family said. Mostly responsible for setting timers on depth charges and releasing them, he helped sink five German submarines as part of the crew of the frigate Duckworth.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2007 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
In "The Water Horse," the mystery of the Loch Ness monster morphs into something that looks a lot like "Free Willy. " It's a boy-and-his-water-pal yarn starring ultra-cute Alex Etel ("Millions") as a Scots lad who finds a mysterious egg on the beach. He takes it home, it hatches, and so does a fairly ambitious story of loss and recovery set in WWII, built around some fairly decent special effects. Little Angus (Etel) is a troubled, lonely kid, isolated on a large estate owned by his father, off serving in the Royal Navy.
NEWS
September 19, 2002 | By Beth Gillin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Prince Andrew Albert Christian Edward, Duke of York, Earl of Inverness and Baron Killyleagh, 42 - flyboy, player, daddy, duffer, funnyman, speed demon, doer of good deeds, and royal billboard - graces us with a visit Sunday. The ex-husband of Weight Watchers pitchwoman Sarah Ferguson will push product in his role as a trade rep. He'll do the noblesse oblige thing Monday, launching a charity in North Philadelphia. The social set is atwitter. Oliver St. Clair Franklin, honorary British consul, reminds us it's "the first visit to Philadelphia by the son of a reigning British monarch in nearly a century.
NEWS
December 11, 2000 | by Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Enjoy this latest wave of Beatlemania all you want. Continue to gnash your teeth over the 1980 murder of John Lennon. But whatever you do, don't ask Julian Lennon about it. "How are you supposed to define your own character when all people want from you are answers about someone else's life, a life that you don't have answers for," the singer and son of the late Beatle complains on his Web site. "I am not John Lennon, I never will be! I have never lived his life and never will do!
NEWS
February 6, 1998 | Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Daniel Baldwin scuttled out of New York's Roosevelt Hospital yesterday, heading for points unknown. "He's resting comfortably right now in an undisclosed location so he can recuperate," said attorney Barry Meyerson, who escorted the actor from the hospital late yesterday morning. The lawyer said members of the famed Baldwin acting clan stayed away to lessen the chances of publicity. (We guess that would be bad publicity. Brother Alec, who doesn't discourage the buzz that he might someday run for public office, probably considers Danny his own personal Roger Clinton or Billy Carter.
NEWS
January 17, 1995 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
BRITISH SQUABBLING OVER BODY IN DAVY JONES' LOCKER A plan to retrieve the body of British buccaneer Sir Francis Drake from his watery grave in the Caribbean and bring it home for a ceremonial burial has run into trouble with the British navy. A British-led team of historians and salvage experts has raised $125,000 to bring Drake to the surface after pinpointing where they believe the body of the famous 16th-century explorer lies off the Panamanian coast. But the Royal Navy is not in favor of the scheme.
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