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NEWS
September 10, 1987 | By Patrisia Gonzales, Inquirer Staff Writer
On June 17, an 8-year-old boy threw a burning can of hair spray into Sonnenberg's Mattress City in Camden, possibly destroying Arthur Sonnenberg's business. It was the second time Sonnenberg's business had been felled by arson, and the June fire may have put Sonnenberg permanently out of business, he said yesterday. Now, all that remains is a charred, 30,000-square-foot building holding mattress springs and a facade that tenuously droops onto the sidewalk at 27th and Federal Streets.
NEWS
October 25, 2011 | By SELCAN HACAOGLU & SUZAN FRASER, Associated Press
ERCIS, TURKEY - Distraught Turkish families mourned outside a mosque or sought to identify loved ones among rows of bodies yesterday as rescue workers scoured debris for survivors after a 7.2-magnitude quake that killed at least 279 people. Rescue teams with generator-powered floodlights worked into the night in the worst-hit city of Ercis, where running water and electricity were cut by the quake that rocked eastern Turkey on Sunday. Unnerved by over 200 aftershocks, many residents slept outside their homes, making campfires to ward off the cold, as aid organizations rushed to erect tents for the homeless.
NEWS
May 25, 2010 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jim Reilly is working on the archaeology project of a lifetime - quite literally, his own. This is at least the 20th time that he has sifted through the rubble inside his burned-out house in Boothwyn, and after slowly walking up to the front door, he hesitates before turning the key. In one sense, Reilly never knows exactly what he might find inside - a toy truck that his father gave to his sons, or maybe one of his wife's Longaberger baskets....
NEWS
September 14, 2005 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A formerly grand four-story stone and brick residence in the 1900 block of Spring Garden Street broke apart and collapsed around midday yesterday, leaving only the front half of the structure precariously standing. While it was later determined that no one in the building - which had been divided into five apartments - was home at the time, initially firefighters feverishly searched the rubble for two Temple University students who lived in the first-floor rear apartment. The students were later found on school assignments.
NEWS
July 9, 1988 | By Fawn Vrazo, Inquirer Staff Writer
After nearly a day of lying pinned in the rubble of a collapsed department store, six people were miraculously pulled to safety here yesterday by rescuers who had all but given up hope that anyone would be found alive. Among the rescued was a 2-year-old girl with braided hair who had been trapped in the debris for hours with her head painfully caught between two beams. Cheers and whistles rang out from workers standing on top of the mountain of rubble as the girl and others were pulled out one by one between 5:30 and 10 a.m. Also rescued were two women, ages 37 and 46; a 9-year-old boy; an 8-year- old girl and a 13-year-old girl, all from Mexico.
NEWS
March 8, 1994 | by Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
Rescuers continued searching early today for a woman believed to be trapped beneath the rubble of two Southwest Philadelphia rowhouses that collapsed last night. A man was killed and a woman was injured by the 10:54 p.m. collapse at 5212 and 5214 Beaumont St., fire officials said. Both lived at 5214 Beaumont, where the search for the trapped woman was concentrated. Lonnie Jackson, 50, was pronounced dead on arrival at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania shortly before midnight, said Fire Capt.
NEWS
September 19, 1990 | By Amy S. Rosenberg and Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writers
They pulled brick after brick from on top of the man until finally they reached him. He was moaning softly, pointing toward his left hand, trying to say something. "He kept pointing to his wedding band," said firefighter Wesley Handy, 33, of Engine 20. "We said, 'Is your wife under there?' and he nodded. He was pretty banged up. He was in shock. " It was a dusty, chaotic and gory scene for the more than 100 people - firefighters, passersby, police officers - who rushed to help after yesterday's building collapse at 930-34 Market St. Bricks flying through the air, slices of twisted metal, people shouting and running around, blood, broken and torn limbs, moans, crushed heads, flattened bodies.
NEWS
June 22, 1990 | Daily News Wire Services
Rescuers using heavy equipment, police dogs and bare hands dug through rubble and mud in northern Iran today in a desperate search for entombed survivors of a massive earthquake that killed more than 28,000 people. Some 6,000 people were reported pulled out of the debris alive. At least 100 aftershocks continued to rattle the northern region near the Caspian Sea, shaking the capital, Tehran, and causing new landslides that trapped trucks carrying relief supplies. But a fleet of rescue helicopters and planes got through to areas cut off by yesterday's quake.
NEWS
September 15, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Rescuers clawing through debris with their hands and clearing collapsed buildings with bulldozers yesterday saved 31 people who had been buried alive by an earthquake that killed at least 17 people and injured 300 in southern Greece. Officials feared that scores of people were still trapped beneath the rubble in Kalamata, a city of 80,000 about 100 miles southwest of Athens, and held out hope that rescue workers could pull them out alive. The earthquake, measuring 6.2 on the Richter scale, struck the port and resort community at 8:27 p.m. Saturday, plunging the city into darkness, toppling buildings and triggering landslides.
NEWS
December 30, 1992 | by Kathy Sheehan, Daily News Staff Writer
Yesterday, Eduarda Bernier could still make out the remnants of her stereo speakers and her TV set in the rubble that was once her home on 5th Street near Susquehanna Avenue. On Monday she had put a roll of film on top of the TV. The city officials to whom she had complained that day about her crumbling public-housing unit had suggested she take pictures of the cracks in her walls and come back. She never got the chance. Around 11:30 Monday night, Bernier heard what at first sounded to her like rain.
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NEWS
July 10, 2014 | By Jason Grant, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two Philadelphia officials say deteriorated rubble stone and mortar, set in place in the early 1900s, caused the sudden collapse of two Cobbs Creek rowhouses Monday. As a demolition crew worked Tuesday to tear down the pancaked homes, the commissioner and emergency services director of the Department of Licenses and Inspections said "the content and structure" of a foundation, made of rubble stone and mortar, under the party wall connecting 6015 and 6017 Spruce St. had broken down over decades.
NEWS
May 23, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Behind the upside-down chairs on the bar in Tom Fischer's Tavern, a plaque hangs from the wall. "The First Bar on This Site Was Born in 1938," it reads. Over the decades, the Haddon Township bar, which prides itself on attracting a diverse crowd, has served doctors and construction workers, patrons young and old. But on Wednesday, a fire temporarily put a cork in the memories. Fire crews responded sometime before 4 a.m. Valerie Fischer, owner since 1995, said a smoldering cigarette was suspected as the cause, but arson had been ruled out. The worst damage was in a back area known as the smoking patio, Fischer said.
NEWS
October 1, 2013 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
"THE CASTLE" that stood for 110 years in the city's Fairhill neighborhood is now gone. Most of what used to be Thomas Edison High School was reduced to rubble during the building's recent demolition. Out of the rubble of the vacant school, on Lehigh Avenue at 7th Street, a new shopping center called Edison Square is scheduled to rise on the site next May. It's one path among many possibilities for the school district, which has dozens of empty buildings in its portfolio. Developers said construction on the Edison development is to begin within "the next few weeks" for the first $13 million phase of the shopping center, which will include a Save-A-Lot grocery store, a Family Dollar, a Burger King, a Subway sandwich shop and a Kicks sneaker store.
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | By Theodore Schleifer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amid the ruins from the Market Street building collapse, investigators have spent the last two weeks sifting through the rubble in search of personal belongings of survivors - and the dead. The list of items lost was long. A wallet. A purse. Keys. A cellphone. A favorite family photo. Yet when the painstaking search for those things ended this week, very few had been found. Those looking for personal belongings came up mostly empty-handed, and many of the items, now imbued with history and tragedy, may never be recovered.
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The woman who survived nearly 13 hours in the rubble of the Salvation Army thrift shop collapse lost both legs at the pelvis because of injuries she sustained, her lawyer said Monday. Mariya Plekan, 52, an immigrant from Ukraine who lives in Hunting Park, was in serious condition at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, said the lawyer, Andrew Stern. She was initially misidentified by city officials as Myra Plekan, 61. Plekan, who was undergoing a subsequent surgery Monday, suffered renal failure and a compromised liver, and developed a "very bad" infection during her ordeal, Stern said.
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
THE WOMAN who was rescued 13 hours after the building collapsed at 22nd and Market streets has lost both of her legs and could face additional surgeries, her attorney said yesterday. Mariya Plekan, 52, of Hunting Park, was one of 13 people injured in the June 5 collapse that also killed six when a wall from a partially demolished building fell on a neighboring Salvation Army thrift shop. Initially misidentified by city officials as Myra Plekan, 61, she was plucked from beneath the rubble by firefighters in a rescue hailed as a miracle.
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Each time they found a dead body, they said a prayer, halting their search to stand in silence. Mostly, though, the rescuers found piles of clothing. Secondhand apparel riddled the debris of the collapsed Salvation Army thrift store on Market Street, tangling with the pieces of brick and lumber through which they delicately sifted. Thirteen hours into their search, they were used to mistaking piles of clothing for a body. But when yet another stretch of fabric was uncovered, they stopped their search anyway.
NEWS
May 30, 2013 | By Tim Talley, Associated Press
MOORE, Okla. - Before residents of Moore can rebuild, they'll have to deal with the debris from the deadly tornado that devastated the Oklahoma City suburb: crushed wood, mangled siding, and battered belongings that could make a pile reaching more than a mile into the sky. The splintered remains' first stop is a landfill where items will be sorted, then recycled or burned. Bricks, for instance, will go to charity projects such as Habitat for Humanity; wood, paper and clothing will be incinerated.
NEWS
May 15, 2013
Prayers at site of fallen factory NEW DELHI - Thousands gathered Tuesday in the rubble of the collapsed Rana Plaza garment factory complex in Bangladesh to pray for the 1,127 victims who died in the ruins of the world's worst apparel industry disaster. Pictures taken at the Islamic prayer ceremony on the outskirts of the capital of Dhaka showed a rescue worker in yellow headgear affixing a red flag on the factory rubble. Army crews, which had been working around the clock for almost three weeks, ended their cleanup-and-recovery operation early Tuesday morning, handing over responsibility to civil authorities.
NEWS
May 12, 2013 | By Julhas Alam and Farid Hossain, Associated Press
SAVAR, Bangladesh - A seamstress who survived 17 days before being rescued from a collapsed garment factory building was panicked, dehydrated, and suffering from insomnia as she recovered in a Bangladesh hospital Saturday, but was in generally good condition, according to her doctors. The rescue Friday of Reshma Begum, 19, brought a boost to the workers who had spent more than two weeks pulling decaying bodies from the rubble. By Saturday, they had resumed their grim task and the death toll surpassed 1,100 in the world's worst garment-industry disaster.
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