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Rudolph Giuliani

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NEWS
May 28, 2001 | By Stephen Seplow INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's the biggest news in the Big Apple, the kind that gets war-sized tabloid headlines, endless chatter on talk radio, and salacious chuckles at the watercooler. It's the divorce of Rudolph Giuliani, the feisty and sanctimonious mayor of New York City who has been banished from the master bedroom at Gracie Mansion, his official residence, by Donna Hanover, the wife he dumped last year by announcing it at a news conference before informing her or their two children. In the latest developments that make this story such juicy grist for the media mill, Hanover last week won a court order barring Judith Nathan, Giuliani's "gal pal" in tabloid-speak, from Gracie Mansion and its grounds.
NEWS
November 19, 2002
HEY, GUYS, where do you get those halos? Both New York former mayor, Rudolph Giuliani and Philadelphia's former police commish, John Timoney, are named as potential candidates for big, important jobs so often that we wonder what their secret is. Giuliani's name has lately come up in connection with a WorldCom board position, the SEC and a Homeland Security post. Timoney's name is on more than one mayoral short list in this city, and was on the list for L.A. police commish.
NEWS
September 25, 2001 | staff writer Dan D. Wiggs from Daily News wire services
TAKE TERRORISTS TO COURT: The Rev. Jesse Jackson is preaching diplomacy over revenge. Jackson told students in Cambridge, Mass., yesterday that he favored "precise intelligence over indiscriminate bombing" as the U.S. response to the murderous attack by terrorists two weeks ago. The political and social activist and occasional candidate said he was willing to confer with world leaders and urge offenders to cooperate with a third party, such...
NEWS
July 1, 2006 | By Inquirer staff writer Miriam Hill
The life story of Bernard Bailey Kerik has switched from degradation to glory and back again. His guilty plea was only the latest in a long list of Kerik headlines: He was born Sept. 4, 1955, in Paterson, N.J. In his autobiography, The Lost Son: A Life in Pursuit of Justice, he describes his mother as an alcoholic prostitute who abandoned him and was later murdered. A high school dropout, he eventually received a general equivalency high school diploma and then a bachelor's degree in 2001 through mail courses at Empire State College, a division of the State University of New York.
NEWS
June 14, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
Rudolph Giuliani isn't shedding any tears for John Gotti. The former mayor is appalled by the media's lavish coverage of the Gambino crime boss's death - particularly in comparison with the amount of ink accorded to former New York Police Commissioner Benjamin Ward, who died the same day. "The emphasis should have been on [the passing] of Ben Ward, not John Gotti," Giuliani said. "Ward was a great friend, a great New Yorker. " Gotti "has always been mythologized, romanticized," Giuliani said Tuesday night in New York, where he spoke at a Reader's Digest event about the people who inspired him. Compared with the heroes of Sept.
NEWS
September 28, 1999 | by William Bunch, Daily News Staff Writer
She came. She listened. She gathered up a bunch of three-zero checks, and left. Hillary Rodham Clinton, the first lady and undeclared Democratic Senate candidate in New York, took a Philadelphia detour from her much ballyhooed "listening tour" of the Empire State last night. But unless you were able to pony up at least $1,000 to contribute to her political committee, you probably saw little more than a smile and a wave from the back seat of a car that whisked into City Hall for a fund-raising cocktail party.
NEWS
July 13, 2006 | By Marc Schogol INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They joked about getting each other's autograph, then Rudolph Giuliani and Lynn Swann stood there and let everyone see that the mayor who had led New York through the 9/11 crisis and the NFL Hall of Famer were a team. At a news conference after a joint appearance in King of Prussia yesterday, veteran Giuliani praised rookie Swann as "somebody new . . . what we need in America right now. " And if Republican gubernatorial candidate Swann should defeat Gov. Rendell, Giuliani indicated he and Swann might have an even closer relationship.
NEWS
March 26, 2007 | By Jim Sleeper
The deluge of commentary on Rudolph Giuliani's presidential prospects has forced me finally to break my long silence about the man. Somebody's got to say it: He shouldn't be president, not because he's too "liberal" or "conservative," or because his positions on social issues have been heterodox, or because he seems tone-deaf on race, or because his family life has been messy, or because he's sometimes been as crass an opportunist as almost every other...
NEWS
May 16, 2000 | By Nathaniel Frank
As scores of reporters shuffled into the cramped foyer of Public School 63 in the East Village, it was as if the irony had been scripted. What happened at P.S. 63 indicates that we're responsible for what the media do to our public figures - and our public discourse. The city's controversial mayor, Rudolph Giuliani, suddenly at the center of a personal drama that has become all too familiar on the political stage, had arrived to announce a food drive operated by City Harvest, a food rescue organization.
NEWS
August 16, 1995 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
BRITISH JUDGE ROCKED BY DISAPPEARANCE OF WIG A British judge's ceremonial wig and robes were nowhere to be found just before he was due to enter court - seems his rock-musician son had borrowed them to wear on stage. John Wroath, 30, a singer and bass guitarist in a band called the Wayward Sons, wore his father's legal duds during a rock concert and then forgot to return them. Judge John Wroath was not amused, British newspapers noted yesterday. "If the case I was due to hear had not collapsed I would have been in the embarrassing position of not having any robes or wig," the 63-year-old judge said.
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NEWS
October 21, 2007 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER SENIOR WRITER
For the leaders of the religious right, the dilemma is obvious and troubling: how to deal with a Republican presidential front-runner when he is not with you on your core issues and you haven't agreed on an alternative. Yesterday, the source of their predicament, the pro-choice former mayor of New York, tried to ease their worries, addressing their Values Voters Summit. In his speech, Rudolph Giuliani neither defended nor disguised his views, asking, "Isn't it better that I tell you what I really believe than to change my positions to fit the prevailing winds?"
NEWS
October 21, 2007 | By Larry Eichel, Inquirer Senior Writer
WASHINGTON - For the leaders of the religious right, the dilemma is obvious and troubling: how to deal with a Republican presidential front-runner when he is not with you on your core issues and you haven't agreed on an alternative. Yesterday, the source of their predicament, the pro-choice former mayor of New York, tried to ease their worries, addressing their Values Voters Summit. In his speech, Rudolph Giuliani neither defended nor disguised his views, asking, "Isn't it better that I tell you what I really believe than to change my positions to fit the prevailing winds?"
NEWS
March 26, 2007 | By Jim Sleeper
The deluge of commentary on Rudolph Giuliani's presidential prospects has forced me finally to break my long silence about the man. Somebody's got to say it: He shouldn't be president, not because he's too "liberal" or "conservative," or because his positions on social issues have been heterodox, or because he seems tone-deaf on race, or because his family life has been messy, or because he's sometimes been as crass an opportunist as almost every other...
NEWS
July 13, 2006 | By Marc Schogol INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They joked about getting each other's autograph, then Rudolph Giuliani and Lynn Swann stood there and let everyone see that the mayor who had led New York through the 9/11 crisis and the NFL Hall of Famer were a team. At a news conference after a joint appearance in King of Prussia yesterday, veteran Giuliani praised rookie Swann as "somebody new . . . what we need in America right now. " And if Republican gubernatorial candidate Swann should defeat Gov. Rendell, Giuliani indicated he and Swann might have an even closer relationship.
NEWS
July 1, 2006 | By Inquirer staff writer Miriam Hill
The life story of Bernard Bailey Kerik has switched from degradation to glory and back again. His guilty plea was only the latest in a long list of Kerik headlines: He was born Sept. 4, 1955, in Paterson, N.J. In his autobiography, The Lost Son: A Life in Pursuit of Justice, he describes his mother as an alcoholic prostitute who abandoned him and was later murdered. A high school dropout, he eventually received a general equivalency high school diploma and then a bachelor's degree in 2001 through mail courses at Empire State College, a division of the State University of New York.
NEWS
December 30, 2002 | By E.J. Dionne Jr
Democrats dispirited by this year's election results can turn to the Empire State and to the nation's largest city for confirmation that their political views are gaining ground and that even very liberal policies can triumph. New York City, after all, has a mayor who recently pushed through a record increase in property taxes to avoid further cuts in the city's budget. New York's governor signed a landmark gay-rights bill this month and has refused to rule out tax increases next year.
NEWS
December 9, 2002 | By Larry Fish INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rudolph Giuliani used to be New York's mayor. Nowadays, he seems to be turning into one of its major industries. For almost any organization with a problem, Giuliani has become the go-to guy. He's been hired to help the National Thoroughbred Racing Association recover from a bet-rigging scandal, to assist Mexico City in cutting crime, to revive bankrupt WorldCom, to assist a pharmaceutical company in preventing abuse of one of its products....
NEWS
November 19, 2002
HEY, GUYS, where do you get those halos? Both New York former mayor, Rudolph Giuliani and Philadelphia's former police commish, John Timoney, are named as potential candidates for big, important jobs so often that we wonder what their secret is. Giuliani's name has lately come up in connection with a WorldCom board position, the SEC and a Homeland Security post. Timoney's name is on more than one mayoral short list in this city, and was on the list for L.A. police commish.
NEWS
June 14, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
Rudolph Giuliani isn't shedding any tears for John Gotti. The former mayor is appalled by the media's lavish coverage of the Gambino crime boss's death - particularly in comparison with the amount of ink accorded to former New York Police Commissioner Benjamin Ward, who died the same day. "The emphasis should have been on [the passing] of Ben Ward, not John Gotti," Giuliani said. "Ward was a great friend, a great New Yorker. " Gotti "has always been mythologized, romanticized," Giuliani said Tuesday night in New York, where he spoke at a Reader's Digest event about the people who inspired him. Compared with the heroes of Sept.
NEWS
January 22, 2002 | Inquirer news services and staffers Frank Wilson and Carrie Rickey contributed to this column
Germantown resident David Wiesner, illustrator and author of a new version of The Three Pigs, yesterday won the Randolph Caldecott Medal, awarded each year to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book for children. Linda Sue Park, author of A Single Shard, the story of an orphan living under a bridge in 12th-century Korea, was awarded the John Newbery Medal. The awards are the most prestigious in children's literature. Both awards were announced during the American Library Association's Midwinter Meeting in New Orleans.
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