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Rudy Giuliani

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NEWS
November 29, 2007 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
IOWA CAUCUS- goers will cast their first ballots in the 2008 presidential race in just five weeks, and Rudy Giuliani, trailing rival Mitt Romney in the Hawkeye State, needs to spend every available moment campaigning there. Yet on Tuesday, Rudy could instead be found in a state whose April primary has for years meant little to the presidential nominating process. He was drawn to Pittsburgh by matters of friendship, loyalty and respect - concepts seldom broached with focus groups and direct messaging.
NEWS
February 20, 1999 | By Sidney Zion
The country may be glad it's over, but plenty of us pundits would be wailing the post-impeachment blues today if all 2000 promised was Al Gore against Bush the Younger. But in the metropolis, hope lives that Hillary Rodham Clinton will say yes to Rudy Giuliani for the Senate, setting up the undercard as the Fight of the Century. Rudy and Hillary have yet to agree to the match, of course, but all signs say that at least he will run. But first, let's look at Hillary as candidate.
NEWS
March 14, 1997 | by Donald M. Rothberg
His image too dour, Bob Dole put aside his suit and tie. But it was not enough. Maybe he should have tried a blond wig and a dress, like Rudy Giuliani. The tough-guy mayor of New York is up for re-election. The former prosecutor and anti-crime crusader does not come across as a lighthearted guy. At least not until the night he cavorted on stage at a press dinner in a gown, wig and heavy makeup. If Giuliani wins a second term in a landslide later this year, political consultants might see irresistible possibilities.
NEWS
October 26, 1994
Republicans have been dreaming about a political tide strong enough to take out some of the biggest names in the Democratic Party: Ted Kennedy, Tom Foley and Mario Cuomo. Those dreams got a rude jolt on Monday when the Republican mayor of New York, Rudolph W. Giuliani, gave Gov. Cuomo a ringing endorsement for a fourth term. Democrats are hailing the mayor as a statesman who acted in the city's best interests, while fellow Republicans are seething that he acted in his own political self-interest.
NEWS
September 27, 2007 | By DANIEL A. CIRUCCI
MORE AND MORE, it's looking like the 2008 Democratic and Republican nominees for president will be Hillary Clinton and Rudy Giuliani. And the two front-runners are certainly acting the parts. Giuliani's latest salvo at Clinton came in the form of a full-page ad in the New York Times in which he blasted Clinton for questioning Gen. David Petraeus' veracity and chided her for refusing to denounce the tactics of MoveOn.org. Giuliani is out to clearly contrast his approach with that of Clinton's, especially on national security.
NEWS
February 27, 2015
WHEN I WAS about 11 or 12, I saw a made-for-television movie called "The Man Without A Country. " It was based on a short story written by Edward Everett Hale, and told the tale of a man who - angered at being tried for treason against the United States - spouted out in the middle of the trial, "I wish I may never hear of the United States again!" In punishment, the astounded judge grants him his wish: He is found guilty and sentenced to spend the rest of his life on U.S. Navy warships.
NEWS
September 14, 2001 | By Jane R. Eisner
Bravo, Rudy. That's what they're saying in New York this week about the mayor of the most important and, in this crushing time, the saddest city in the world. Since the moment Tuesday that the famous skyline of Manhattan changed its signature forever, Mayor Giuliani has been everywhere - leading, consoling, communicating, in hard hat and windbreaker, answering the needs of that most critical of human beings: the ordinary New Yorker. He even sounds humble. It's natural to expect our political leaders to grow taller and more confident during a crisis; inside, we secretly fear their diminishment.
NEWS
August 30, 2000 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Rudy Giuliani: Emperor of the City By Andrew Kirtzman Morrow, 333 pages, $25 FOR A WHILE THERE, New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani was on a roll. It was unusual enough for a Republican to be elected mayor of America's largest (and mostly Democratic) city, but then Giuliani went on to earn a national reputation for taking a city that, a decade ago, a Time Magazine cover story declared a hopeless mess and giving it new life. Giuliani brought order to the usual chaos of city government, lowered the crime rate, replaced fear with hope and lured billions of dollars' worth of new development.
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Rudy Giuliani's ridiculous comments questioning President Obama's affection for his country are a throwback to when Vietnam War protesters and anyone else who challenged America to cure its shortcomings were urged to "love it, or leave it. " That philosophical intolerance was wrong then and remains so now, especially with Washington caught up in a partisan divide that has threatened funding for Homeland Security. While other politicians have been calling for bipartisanship following last year's election of a Republican-majority Congress, Giuliani prefers to throw bombs at the Democratic president.
NEWS
July 23, 2016
Donald Trump's show-business approach to campaigning and thinly veiled appeals to bigotry have captured public and media attention, but neither tactic is entirely new to presidential politics. Even his weird hair isn't without its forerunners. (We're looking at you, Jackson and Van Buren.) What is truly unprecedented about the man who accepted the Republican presidential nomination Thursday is his lack of obviously relevant experience. If elected, the real estate developer, reality-television star, and onetime gambling mogul would be the first president in U.S. history with no experience in public office.
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NEWS
July 23, 2016
Donald Trump's show-business approach to campaigning and thinly veiled appeals to bigotry have captured public and media attention, but neither tactic is entirely new to presidential politics. Even his weird hair isn't without its forerunners. (We're looking at you, Jackson and Van Buren.) What is truly unprecedented about the man who accepted the Republican presidential nomination Thursday is his lack of obviously relevant experience. If elected, the real estate developer, reality-television star, and onetime gambling mogul would be the first president in U.S. history with no experience in public office.
NEWS
July 19, 2016
Donald Trump's family, veterans, immigration reform advocates, venture capitalists, motivational speakers, and celebrities will take the stage this week at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, along with his former political rivals, more than a dozen members of Congress, and a half-dozen governors. The convention committee on Sunday released the lineup for the convention, scheduled for Monday through Thursday at the Quicken Loans Arena, home of the NBA champion Cavaliers.
NEWS
February 27, 2015
WHEN I WAS about 11 or 12, I saw a made-for-television movie called "The Man Without A Country. " It was based on a short story written by Edward Everett Hale, and told the tale of a man who - angered at being tried for treason against the United States - spouted out in the middle of the trial, "I wish I may never hear of the United States again!" In punishment, the astounded judge grants him his wish: He is found guilty and sentenced to spend the rest of his life on U.S. Navy warships.
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Rudy Giuliani's ridiculous comments questioning President Obama's affection for his country are a throwback to when Vietnam War protesters and anyone else who challenged America to cure its shortcomings were urged to "love it, or leave it. " That philosophical intolerance was wrong then and remains so now, especially with Washington caught up in a partisan divide that has threatened funding for Homeland Security. While other politicians have been calling for bipartisanship following last year's election of a Republican-majority Congress, Giuliani prefers to throw bombs at the Democratic president.
NEWS
February 1, 2008 | By Joseph A. Gambardello and Cynthia Burton INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
With New Jersey's first presidential primary of consequence in years less than a week away, the political landscape shifted yesterday to reflect changes in the races in both parties. The biggest movement was on the Republican side, where more than 20 notables who had backed Rudy Giuliani followed their candidate's lead and tossed their support to Arizona Sen. John McCain. "We are one team, one family, one cause," said State Sen. Bill Baroni (R., Mercer), state chair of the McCain campaign, in embracing the Giuliani camp's former field generals.
NEWS
January 27, 2008 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER SENIOR WRITER
On Friday night, after having finished no better than fourth in the first six tests of the primary season, Rudy Giuliani was still touting his electability. The former mayor of New York told a ballroom full of the party faithful that he remained the GOP's best hope in the fall. Yes, Giuliani conceded, he's "an unconventional candidate" who has run an unconventional campaign. But this, he said, is an unconventional election. And the man who bypassed one state after another in the nomination fight said that only he could mount a competitive, 50-state race against Hillary Rodham Clinton or Barack Obama.
NEWS
December 18, 2007 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER SENIOR WRITER
At lunchtime yesterday, Rudy Giuliani met with about 200 employees at a corporate headquarters here. The Republican presidential candidate opened with a seven-minute speech, stressing the need for America to be on the offense against terrorism and in favor of a growing economy. Then he took five questions from the floor at Goss International Corp., the printing-press-maker. After little more than a half-hour, his only public appearance of the day was over. Voters in New Hampshire's first-in-the-nation primary are accustomed to getting a little more from their suitors.
NEWS
November 29, 2007 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
IOWA CAUCUS- goers will cast their first ballots in the 2008 presidential race in just five weeks, and Rudy Giuliani, trailing rival Mitt Romney in the Hawkeye State, needs to spend every available moment campaigning there. Yet on Tuesday, Rudy could instead be found in a state whose April primary has for years meant little to the presidential nominating process. He was drawn to Pittsburgh by matters of friendship, loyalty and respect - concepts seldom broached with focus groups and direct messaging.
NEWS
November 13, 2007 | By Dick Polman
From time to time we will run excerpts from columnist Dick Polman's blog, "Dick Polman's American Debate. " Watch this page for Polman high points - and check out the blog. Friday. At week's end, let's bestow a few awards: Spiciest Straight Talk . . . Joe Biden. When he was asked . . . whether he would like to be considered as Democratic running mate on a ticket headed by Hillary Clinton, he dispensed with the usual variations of evasion. . . . Instead, he opted for candor mode.
NEWS
September 27, 2007 | By DANIEL A. CIRUCCI
MORE AND MORE, it's looking like the 2008 Democratic and Republican nominees for president will be Hillary Clinton and Rudy Giuliani. And the two front-runners are certainly acting the parts. Giuliani's latest salvo at Clinton came in the form of a full-page ad in the New York Times in which he blasted Clinton for questioning Gen. David Petraeus' veracity and chided her for refusing to denounce the tactics of MoveOn.org. Giuliani is out to clearly contrast his approach with that of Clinton's, especially on national security.
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