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Rudy Giuliani

NEWS
October 3, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
Former New York City Police Commissioner William Bratton has been selected to be police chief of Los Angeles, a city councilman there confirmed yesterday. "We have been told that Bratton will be named as chief tomorrow," City Council member Jack Weiss said. "It is a positive step forward for the city of Los Angeles. " Bratton, 54, was police commissioner in New York from 1994-1996 before resigning under pressure from then-Mayor Rudy Giuliani. Prior to that, he led the New York City Transit Police and the Boston Police Department.
NEWS
April 24, 2011 | By Samantha Gross, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Donald Trump says he's considering running in the primary for the Republican presidential nomination, but the real estate mogul didn't vote in primary elections for more than two decades, according to the New York City Board of Elections. Trump voted in the primary election in the 1989 New York mayor's race - when Rudy Giuliani beat businessman Ronald Lauder - then didn't vote in a primary for 21 years, board spokeswoman Valerie Vazquez said Saturday. The report on Trump's voting record initially appeared on TV station NY1 a day earlier.
NEWS
August 3, 2016
Even if the so-far-slippery, politically facile Donald Trump bounces back from Hillary Clinton's post-convention bump and survives condemnation from veterans' groups, Gold Star moms and calls for Republicans to disavow him, he still faces a heavy lift. Even if he again manages to divert and move on from the mess he created with the American Muslim family whose Army son was killed in Iraq (then talking about his own "sacrifices" as a builder and job-creator), he still faces trouble down the road.
NEWS
June 27, 1988 | By ROSE MARIE ARCE, New York Daily News
Tawana Brawley's advisers yesterday accused U.S. Attorney Rudolph Giuliani of conspiring with WCBS-TV to publicize the story of a man who claimed he recorded them debunking her sexual-assault story. "Rudy Giuliani may be your fair-haired boy, but he is our civil rights nightmare," the Rev. Al Sharpton told reporters at Bethany Baptist Church in Brooklyn. Brawley's mother, Glenda, has taken "sanctuary" in the church to avoid arrest for contempt of a grand jury that is investigating Tawana's case.
NEWS
January 7, 1995 | by Jorge Fitz-Gibbon, Laura Fahrenthold and Don Singleton, New York Daily News
An act of everyday heroism led to tragedy yesterday in the Bronx. James Chenault, a veteran welfare clerk and Vietnam vet, was riding an elevator in his Bronx office building when it apparently stopped slightly above the second floor and the doors opened. As Chenault, 55, held the door open with his back to allow a woman to get off, a second woman got her foot caught as she tried to step off, and Chenault quickly moved to free her. He did, but while he was still in the doorway, leaning in, Car No. 1 lurched suddenly upward, the doors still open.
NEWS
December 18, 2007
THE CITY'S Commission on Human Relations says it will take about two months to decide whether cheesesteak entrepreneur Joey Vento discriminates against customers who don't speak English. Two months? Two minutes would be more like it. This case is weak where it needs to be strong. There's no proof anyone was denied service because he failed to adhere to the sign on Vento's steak-shop window: "This is America. When ordering, please speak English. " Say what you will about the sign.
NEWS
March 2, 2007
Political supporters known as "bundlers" are an inevitable part of federal election campaigns. Bundlers are wealthy or well-connected individuals who promise to raise, well, bundles of cash for a candidate, in return for who knows what. In the case of former Texas state Sen. Teel Bivins, the reward for being a "bundler" for George W. Bush in 2000 and 2004 was an appointment as U.S. ambassador to Sweden. Bivins was a Bush "pioneer" in 2000, raising at least $100,000 from other donors.
NEWS
September 4, 2008 | By Jonathan Storm INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
A star was born last night. Feisty and smart, tripping rarely on her words, Sarah Palin accomplished what she needed to do, introducing herself as a legitimate national candidate who knows how to gleam through a TV camera. Speaking authoritatively and forcefully as an energy expert, while also presenting herself as a hockey mom, Palin charmed and invigorated her audience at the Republican National Convention. "The difference between a hockey mom and a pit bull," she quipped: "lipstick.
NEWS
January 10, 2008
If this is chaos, let's have some more. The results of the presidential primaries in New Hampshire have kept both races wide open, giving voters in New Jersey and elsewhere a chance to cast meaningful votes. That's good for democracy. The danger of this early primary calendar was that the races would be settled by mid-January, with only Iowans and New Hampshire residents having their say. But the lack of front-runners is turning the Democratic and Republican primaries into the most exciting in recent memory.
NEWS
November 4, 2001
Afghanistanism used to be a derisive term applied to pundits who delighted in pontificating on far-flung topics, while ignoring local problems. These days, most Americans understandably engage in constant Afghanistanism. The word no longer refers to some remote area whose repressive government and dire living circumstances make for an interesting intellectual exercise. Now it calls to mind the front line of the war on terrorism. Yet on Tuesday - Election Day - Americans necessarily must shift back to thinking locally.
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