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Ruins

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TRAVEL
April 10, 2011
Discover Mayaland Hotel, only 100 yards from the spectacular reconstructed temple city of Chichen Itza in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. In Travel.
NEWS
August 30, 1994 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
For their own safety and to prevent further vandalism, a group of neighborhood "town watchers" has started night and early-morning patrols around the burned ruins of the Palumbo Cafe-Restaurant in South Philadelphia. The Bella Vista Community Association took the action following last Thursday's three-alarm fire at the CR Club. The club was the only portion of the restaurant complex that remained standing after a four-alarm fire destroyed the 100-year-old landmark at 824 Catharine St. on June 20. The fire marshal's office has ruled both fires arsons.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1995 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
As an anxious mother and her teenage son prepare to move from the country to Rome, the boy complains and asks what he will do in the big city. "You'll keep an eye on the ruins," she responds in a tone that suggests they will encounter more ruins among the people than the ancient monuments. Pier Paolo Pasolini's Mamma Roma unfolds as one woman's tragedy in a world of moral dilapidation, and the mother's worst fears are soon realized in ways she could never have imagined. Mamma Roma, filmed by the late and still controversial Pasolini in 1962, is a movie that was released amid tumult and never received the distribution it merited.
NEWS
December 28, 1986 | By June Goodwin, Special to The Inquirer
The shapes and colors of this rock-carved city in the Jordanian desert wash gradually through a visitor's consciousness until, after a day of strolling in the ruins, the clamor of the ancient metropolis, echoing across more than a thousand years, is virtually audible. Today, when a donkey lets out its hee-haw bray, the noise goes on and on, bouncing off the sandstone cliffs and ricocheting through the canyons and man- made caves, as though electronically amplified. Petra is one of the world's better-kept tourist secrets.
NEWS
July 14, 2011 | Staff Report
Fire marshals are investigating a fire that ripped through a house in Gloucester County early today, leaving it a smoking, charred ruin. Two children reportedly were treated for smoke inhalation at the scene while firefighters battled the blaze in the 2-story house at 22 Stanger Court in Clayton. The fast spreading fire apparently started before 5 a.m. in the attached garage of the house bordering Scotland Run Park and it took firefighters about a half-hour to bring it under control.' Contact the Online Breaking News Desk at online@phillynews.com or 215-854-2443.   
NEWS
April 27, 1997 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
The Incan ruins at Machu Picchu, Peru's most popular tourist destination, could find themselves in the spotlight - literally. The National Culture Institute said this month that it was considering a plan by a French company to illuminate the ruins using solar-powered lights mounted outside the mysterious city, according to news reports in Lima. Traditionally, the entrance to Machu Picchu closes before darkness falls, and a culture official said that tourists would not be allowed into the ruins after dark even if they are lighted.
NEWS
October 19, 2006 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the heart of the Italian Market, half a block from DiBruno's, photographer Vincent D. Feldman has come across something strikingly evocative of Rome, but this is not a story about cheese or prosciutto. This is a story about ruins, and a not-so-ancient city that is startlingly full of them. And what has brought Feldman to Montrose Street between Eighth and Ninth is an abandoned municipal pool, the Fante Leon pool, whose sculpted granite facade, intricate statuary, and carved moldings speak of a hard-to-fathom grandeur, despite the fact that a tree is now growing out of the pool basin.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1988 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Staff Writer
With the heat bearing down, the humidity wearing down, and the air conditioning breaking down, High Season affords a fast, cheap escape from this ozone-swathed Summer of Hell. An amiable lark of a movie starring that amiable lark of an actress, Jacqueline Bisset, Clare Peploe's High Season is a diverting romantic romp shot in the most diverting of locales - the Greek isle of Rhodes, where whitewashed villages cradled in rocky green hillocks tumble down into cobalt blue seas. It's an idyllic retreat - the idyllic-ness of it all being summarily overrun by camera-snapping hordes of vacationing Brits, who line the beaches like endives lining a produce shelf: thin, white and packed closely together.
NEWS
June 4, 2009 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com
The best thing I can say about "My Life in Ruins," a forced comedy about a woman finding love in the Greek isles, is that there's no ABBA. Bad jokes abound, though, in this story of an American woman (Nia Vardalos) who takes a job as a low-rent guide and gets stuck taking awful tourists to see the sites. One stereotype is worse than the next - ugly Americans (dressed in red, white and blue), an Aussie couple that's drunk all the time, snotty British aristocrats, etc. There were a pair of sexually desperate Spanish divorcees - I'd like to learn more about them - but "My Life in Ruins" is a woman's movie, and is soon fixated on the overwhelmed tour guide's search for love.
TRAVEL
June 15, 2014 | By Fred Beckley, For The Inquirer
I've probably done worse things to our kids than drag them through innumerable ruins - Greek, Roman, Mayan, etc. - but we have been to a lot of ruins. If it was built and fell down, we'll make a detour; if it was built, fell down, buried, and dug up again, we'll book a room. Owing to their proximity to margaritas and warm beaches, we've been to a lot of big-ticket Mayan ruins in particular (Tikal, Tulum, Chichen Itza, Caracol). On a recent cruise, though, we stopped at Costa Maya, Mexico, and discovered, by circumstance and somewhat by accident, a new favorite.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 2, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
Perhaps the painting had survived the flames - the cherished, nearly century-old portrait of Pvt. Boleslaw Grochowski, the first soldier from Bridesburg killed in World War I and the namesake of American Legion Post 396. Firefighters said they had noticed a painting hanging amid the ruins. Perhaps, by some miracle, it was not lost. And the men standing outside the charred remains of American Legion Post 396 on Tuesday morning were looking for some kind of miracle, no matter how small.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Shares in Campbell Soup Co. fell more than 6 percent Friday after the Camden-based food company reported a sales decline for the quarter ended May 1. Campbell blamed cautious consumer spending, weak soup sales from a mild winter, soft results for V-8 juices, and cold, rainy weather in California that disrupted the fresh carrot supply in its Bolthouse Farms division. The carrot problem at Bolthouse, which sells juices, carrot concentrate, and fresh carrots, accounted for $14 million in lost sales in the quarter, Campbell chief financial officer Anthony DiSilvestro told analysts.
SPORTS
April 24, 2016 | By Marc Narducci, Columnist
The story of Barnegat High School lefthander Jason Groome has become national news, since he could stand to make millions in Major League Baseball's first-year player draft. But he must wait a few weeks to pitch for free for his high school team. It brings up some fascinating questions about the NJSIAA, which declared Groome ineligible for either 30 days or half of his team's scheduled regular-season games. The NJSIAA also ruled that Barnegat had to forfeit the two games that the 6-foot-5, 230-pound lefthander pitched and his team won. Here's the short version of what happened to Groome.
NEWS
April 14, 2016 | By Stephanie Farr, Staff Writer
The false-positive syphilis test in 2014 spread through Edna Villafane's life like an insidious infection, ruining everything in its wake, she says. Enraged by the news that his pregnant girlfriend of eight years had a sexually transmitted disease, Villafane's boyfriend kicked down her door - which, she says, led to her eviction from her North Philadelphia apartment. Villafane says the stress of being told she had a venereal disease, and of losing both her love and her home, caused her to go into premature labor.
SPORTS
April 6, 2016 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
CINCINNATI - The pick-your-poison pen that rookie general manager Matt Klentak has assembled for the start of the 2016 season left Phillies manager Pete Mackanin with nothing but wrong doors to open once the eighth inning arrived early Monday evening at Great American Ballpark. Jeremy Hellickson, making the first opening-day start of his career, ended up as the guy who got zonked, and the relievers who coughed up the 2-1 lead he had left for them knew the starter had received a raw deal.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2015 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
Deep inside the vast New Jersey Pinelands, there comes a moment when the utter stillness seems to become its own a sound. Celebrated Princeton writer John McPhee understood that moment and all the others that define this 1.1-million-acre wonder in his critically acclaimed 1968 book, The Pine Barrens . His clarion cry then and now: The region deserves to be cherished and preserved. Continuing what McPhee started is the Pinelands Preservation Alliance (PPA), founded in 1989. The PPA's commitment to preservation is twinned with another goal: getting people to the Pinelands, sometimes with a bit of a McPhee twist.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
LAST SUMMER, Blair Shaw, an attorney who lives in Brewerytown, regularly walked his dog, Bailey, past a dense weed jungle on Master Street near 27th, unaware that in 2011 it had been Marathon Farm, an oasis of veggies in an urban food desert. Its motto: "Spreading the Love: one carrot at a time!" But by 2013, the Marathon Grill restaurant chain, which had cleared the third-of-an-acre lot and created Marathon Farm with such high hopes, suffered financial setbacks and pulled out. By last summer, the raised wood-frame beds had deteriorated and disappeared in the tall weeds, leaving no clue of their brief "one carrot at a time" history.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
Ant-Man is upon us. On Friday, another superhero heads to the multiplexes. A Silver Age brethren of Iron Man, Spider-Man, and Thor, Ant-Man is, um, a little different. Sure, he has the superhuman strength, the supercool costume, and the supersmart-alecky retorts of a Marvel Comics crimebuster. But this guy is less than an inch high, and if he joined his fellow Formicidae in an invasion of your kitchen pantry, you'd grab the Raid and gun him down with the rest of the pests. How can this tiny speck possibly do battle with evil masterminds bent on world domination?
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | By Steve and Mia
Q: My father-in-law, who lives with us, asked me if my husband and I were having sex because he said he hadn't heard any noises coming from our bedroom. I was caught off guard and didn't answer him. Ever since, I've felt uncomfortable when my husband and I are making love in our bedroom. I feel like my father-in-law is listening at the door. He's disabled and can't afford to live on his own. I resent him being in my house all day snooping on our sex lives. How should I handle this? I want to put him out, but my husband wouldn't stand for it.  Mia: Find a senior-citizen apartment that he can move into.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | By Steve and Mia
Q: I was having sex with this guy I'm seeing, and, out of the blue, he started hollering out things like, "Yes! That's it, that's it!" At one point, he started calling out my name. It was really loud, so loud that I completely lost the mood. I told him about it, but he started up again the next time he came over. What do you think? Mia: I think you should stay at his house. That way, if he starts calling out your name, anybody who hears it won't know who you are. Steve: How do you know he wasn't thinking about a new invention?
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