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Ruins

NEWS
February 12, 2013 | By Jan Hefler, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The gravel lot tucked into a remote area of Gloucester County once housed a fleet of 100 yellow school buses that would rumble back and forth on weekdays. But when Hurricane Sandy hit in the fall - soon after the bus company moved out - the empty lot in Glassboro was assigned a new purpose: More than 300 vehicles that were damaged by raging rivers of saltwater were hauled to the five-acre property, Glassboro officials said. In New Jersey, lots like these have been tapped to temporarily hold an estimated 72,000 devastated cars, trucks, boats, and jet skis while they are processed for resale or salvaged parts.
NEWS
February 9, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The stone wall in the excavation trench is low and humble, and until recently was buried under a compost pile. But to officials in East Pikeland Township, it is part of a national treasure, the most important piece of the Chester County community's claim to a place in the nation's history. It is the remnant of a gunpowder mill destroyed by Hessian troops in September 1777 during the Revolutionary War. "It was the very first U.S. government armory," James Garrison, chair of the township historical commission, said in an interview.
NEWS
January 28, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
For two centuries, give or take a few years, an enormous stone barn has occupied a patch of land now at the end of a winding Main Line driveway on Waterloo Road in Easttown Township. In the township's historic archives, it is known as the Kennedy Barn. For residents in the area, it's Mrs. Rossi's barn; for years, it was part of the estate of Rose Rossi, one of the cofounders of ANRO Inc., a printing company. But lately, it has been the central figure in the Battle of the Barn, pitting longtime Main Line residents against a builder of some of the region's largest and most luxurious residences.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
ATLANTIC CITY - First, the good news for this resort: Fewer people now erroneously believe the Boardwalk was destroyed by Hurricane Sandy. The bad news? Twenty-five percent of respondents to an online survey still think it was. Tourism officials fear the misconception is discouraging some visitors. The Atlantic City Alliance, the new marketing arm of the casino resort, said the survey represents an improvement from a similar poll in November, in which 41 percent of respondents believed the entire Boardwalk was gone.
NEWS
January 14, 2013 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
New art often comes with a backstory, which can be useful in helping identify a point of entry into otherwise-enigmatic work. The genesis of Daniel Arsham's sculpture at the Fabric Workshop and Museum is particularly dramatic, to the point where the story implants itself so firmly in the viewer's consciousness that it biases one's evaluation of the artist's efforts. Arsham makes sure this happens by including in his installation, "Reach Ruin," a sculpture incorporating sound, light, and music that re-creates a cataclysmic event and his enduring memory of it. The event was Hurricane Andrew, one of the most powerful and destructive storms in U.S. history, which struck Florida in late August 1992.
NEWS
January 10, 2013 | By Peter Mucha, Breaking News Desk
"Brutal cold wave heading for the U.S.," trumpets AccuWeather.com. Yet Philadelphia's forecast for the next week looks wonderfully mild, with highs in the mid 50s today, upper 40s Thursday and Friday, and upper 50s Saturday, Sunday and Monday, according to the National Weather Service. It could even hit 60 on Sunday. Lows might stay in the 40s from Friday night to Monday night in Philadelphia. Then come "bitter cold" and "progressively colder and colder waves of air"? Maybe.
NEWS
November 25, 2012 | By Jay Reeves, Associated Press
CORDOVA, Ala. - Main Street in this old mill town looks about the same as it did the day after tornadoes killed about 250 people across Alabama a year and a half ago: Battered red bricks and broken glass litter the pavement, and the buildings still standing are rickety and roofless. The entire one-block downtown, still deemed unsafe, remains sealed off by a chain-link fence. City officials blame the Federal Emergency Management Agency, saying the money to demolish skeletons of the old buildings is mired in miles of red tape.
NEWS
October 29, 2012 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: My husband insists that meticulous plans are necessary before embarking on anything - but he hates to plan himself. Here's how it plays out: Me: How about we go to Annapolis this weekend? I'll find a B&B, ask some friends for restaurant recommendations, and get a dog-sitter. Husband: What else will we do there? What are the hours of the museums? The admission costs? Is the dog-sitter insured? Are you sure we should drive our car?
NEWS
October 21, 2012 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN, Daily News Staff Writer
FORMER REPUBLICAN presidential candidate Herman Cain wants employers to advise their employees about how to vote in the Nov. 6 general election. Cain, speaking to about 30 people at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Philadelphia Friday as part of his 30-day "Truth Tour," said employers must educate their workers about the presidential candidates' public policy proposals. "Because one of the reasons we had to do this truth tour is that stupid people are ruining America," Cain declared. "Some of them don't know they're stupid.
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