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Ruins

NEWS
February 23, 2012 | By Nick Perry, Associated Press
WELLINGTON, New Zealand - As families of the 185 people killed in the Christchurch earthquake marked Wednesday's one-year anniversary of the disaster, signs of a city still broken were all around them. Hundreds of wrecked buildings downtown are waiting to be torn down so reconstruction can begin in earnest - many of them within sight of the morning ceremony at Latimer Square. The slow pace of recovery is drawing criticism from residents and developers as it wears at the reputation of Mayor Bob Parker, who was praised in the days after the quake for his leadership and for calmly articulating the pain and frustration many were feeling.
NEWS
February 12, 2012 | By Mark Stevenson, Associated Press
MEXICO CITY - When neighbors in the hills east of Mexico City saw backhoes ripping up pre-Hispanic relics for a highway, they did something unexpected in a country where building projects often bulldoze through ruins: They launched protests to stop the digging and demanded an accounting of what is there. Dozens of residents set up a protest camp and filed complaints with state and federal officials, demanding the highway be rerouted, hoping that studies of the site could help solve an age-old riddle.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2012
DEAR ABBY: My wife, "Kate," and her sister, "Judy," do not get along, to the point that my wife refuses to be in the same room with her. I have a class reunion coming up, and Judy is in my class. Because we're not sure Judy will show up, Kate has said she will attend - but she'll leave if Judy arrives. We had planned on going in separate cars so Kate could escape if necessary. But now she says if Judy puts in an appearance, she'll be upset with me if I don't leave with her. I don't get along with Judy either, but I'd like the chance to catch up with other classmates.
NEWS
December 16, 2011 | BY REGINA MEDINA, medinar@phillynews.com 215-854-5985
OVERWHELMED, depressed, frustrated - no one ever said that being a Catholic schoolteacher, parent or student these days would be a cakewalk. Looming over the Catholic-school hallways, faculty lounges, households and blogs is talk of school closings by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and endless "what if" scenarios. Archbishop Charles Chaput met Tuesday with an advisory panel assigned to develop a plan for Catholic education, which has been plagued by dropping enrollment and rising tuition.
NEWS
October 20, 2011 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, farrs@phillynews.com 215-854-4225
AN 84-YEAR-OLD ex-university official savagely attacked by four young punks during a walk in Wissahickon Valley Park earlier this week theorizes that the beating he endured was a cruel game of "get the old geezer. " Jim Shea, a former vice president of university relations for Temple, from 1968 to 1983, walks up to five miles on Forbidden Drive, in Fairmount Park, three times a week, but that type of stamina wasn't enough to stave off the lowlifes who not only beat him bloody, but dealt a blow to one of the things he holds most dear - his pride.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2011 | By Tim Grant, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
When Wall Street banks hit rock bottom three years ago and investors across the nation were crying uncle, members of one American subculture emerged relatively unscathed: the Amish. "Their whole worldview is based on living below their means, never ever above their means," said Lorilee Craker, author of the book Money Secrets of the Amish: Finding True Abundance in Simplicity, Sharing and Saving (Thomas Nelson, $15.99). "They are so much more prudent than the rest of us," Craker said.
NEWS
September 11, 2011 | By George Jahn, Associated Press
PETRONELL-CARNUNTUM, Austria - They lived in cells barely big enough to turn around in and usually fought until they died. This was the lot of those at a sensational scientific discovery unveiled this month: well-preserved ruins of a gladiator school in Austria. The Carnuntum ruins are part of a city of 50,000 people 28 miles east of Vienna that flourished about 1,700 years ago, a major military and trade outpost linking the far-flung Roman empire's Asian boundaries to its central and northern European lands.
TRAVEL
August 21, 2011 | By Christopher Elliott, TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES
Question: My partner and I returned from a six-day vacation at Barcelo Puerto Vallarta in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. While we were there, many guests were afflicted by a serious illness. We began hearing about it soon after our arrival, and within two days, we were both violently ill with vomiting, diarrhea, and fever. For the last four days of our trip, we were barely able to eat or drink and wouldn't dare take the chance of leaving the resort for any excursions. Judging by the large number of complaints posted online, many other guests were also affected.
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