CollectionsRuling Class
IN THE NEWS

Ruling Class

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1995 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
From the Ealing Studio comedies to the barbs hurled by the Monty Python troupe, savage attacks on the English class system have been a staple of British screen comedy. Peter Medak's The Ruling Class was made in 1972, but it's not dated because the ruling class is still alive and well. Peter Barnes adapted his own play and gave Peter O'Toole a heavy cross to bear as the 14th Earl of Gurney. The earl thinks he's Jesus Christ and spends some of his time in a trance on the cross he totes around.
NEWS
June 14, 2012 | By Randal O'Toole
Despite all the talk about the 1 percent vs. the 99 percent, America's real cultural and economic divide is between the middle class — college-educated people with knowledge-based jobs — and the working class — less educated people with physical and repetitive jobs. This little-discussed divide shapes much of our political and social debate.   Members of the middle class preach tolerance and inclusion, yet they regard working-class tastes, values, and politics with contempt.
NEWS
September 29, 2008
IN RESPONSE to your recent editorial on the murder of Philadelphia Police Officer Patrick McDonald, I would like to ask what exactly you're referring to when you suggest that this brutal cold-blooded murder represents a "battle of haves versus have-nots. " Are the editors at the Daily News so unconsciously caught up in a Marxist interpretation of history that every conflict the paper covers is ultimately seen through the lens of a perpetual conflict between classes with opposing interests, rather than - as most of your readers see the world - as individuals with moral agency freely making decisions each and every day of their lives?
NEWS
February 8, 1992
HOW TO SPEED MUNICIPAL UNION NEGOTIATIONS I note that negotiations of new contracts between the city and many labor unions will most certainly accelerate quite soon. What I am about to suggest was done in New York City some years ago and was used as a last resort, but I am suggesting its immediate use. Put the negotiations on public television. Let all view the actual give and take, who is reasonable, who is making unreasonable and unjust demands. It will work. Outrageous demands will not be put forth nor argued for weeks.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1990 | By Renee Lucas Wayne, Daily News Staff Writer
Though one would be hard-pressed to sum up in a few words all the themes woven throughout the ragged tapestry that is Athol Fugard's challenging drama "Boesman and Lena," from the first glimpse of the set to the final line, two words repeatedly come to mind. Desolate places. The last of Fugard's "Port Elizabeth" plays - which were written in the 1960s - "Boesman And Lena" is the story of a black South African couple who have been displaced by bulldozers and forced to flee their shanty town.
NEWS
August 20, 1991 | By GEORGE WILL
Among the jokes Soviet citizens use to keep despair at bay is - was - this: Gorbachev says, "When I came to power, Soviet society was on the verge of a deep abyss. Now we have taken a bold step forward. " He was never nearly bold enough. Now he has suffered condign punishment, discarded by a system he never considered discarding. The two great questions of the Gorbachev era were answered in the asking of them: Would an entrenched, brutal and cynical ruling class liquidate itself in order to improve the lot of the masses it exists to exploit?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2003 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The trouble with Young Turks is that those radicals who bring down regimes inevitably grow middle-aged and establishment. So it is with the directors interviewed in A Decade Under the Influence, one of two new documentaries about how the rock-and-roll generation changed Hollywood. (The other is Easy Riders, Raging Bulls, taken from Peter Biskind's book, and has no scheduled release date.) Today Robert Altman, Francis Ford Coppola and Martin Scorsese - to name some of the lean and hungry revolutionaries who stormed the Hollywood gates 30 years ago - radiate the discreet charm of the ruling class.
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | by Ellen Gray, Daily News Staff Writer
Sometimes it's hard to imagine that anyone could love Jane Tennison. We meet a man who says he does, in the opening minutes of "Prime Suspect 3," but as he almost immediately leaves London to return to America and is never seen again in the series' ensuing four hours, he can hardly be considered an authority. Tennison (Helen Mirren), who in the original "Prime Suspect" shed a husband and who has subsequently shed a lover or two, is more than ever a woman on her own as the much-awaited third series opens tonight on PBS' "Mystery!"
NEWS
January 28, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
The TV ads take pains to point out the similarities between "Edge of Darkness" and "Taken," a huge sleeper hit this time last year. Could be the start of a new midwinter movie tradition - during the coldest and darkest days of the year, we all get to warm our hands over a barrel of flaming whup-ass. You can get good and toasty watching "Edge of Darkness," with Mel Gibson in the Liam Neeson role of avenging dad, a man (to paraphrase "Taken") whose particular set of skills make him a nightmare for the people who mess with his daughter.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 14, 2012 | By Randal O'Toole
Despite all the talk about the 1 percent vs. the 99 percent, America's real cultural and economic divide is between the middle class — college-educated people with knowledge-based jobs — and the working class — less educated people with physical and repetitive jobs. This little-discussed divide shapes much of our political and social debate.   Members of the middle class preach tolerance and inclusion, yet they regard working-class tastes, values, and politics with contempt.
NEWS
March 24, 2012 | By Rick O’Brien, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
STATE COLLEGE - Imhotep Charter had its ups and downs during the regular season and Public League playoffs, where it bowed out early. But the Panthers sorted through their problems, found their way back to Penn State's Bryce Jordan Center, and ruled the PIAA Class AA boys' roost again. On Saturday, overcoming poor free-throw shooting and a rash of turnovers, Imhotep fought past District 7's Beaver Falls, 56-54, in overtime for its third state crown in four seasons. "We had some chemistry issues, lost some kids due to academic eligibility, and we kicked a few kids off the team," coach Andre Noble said.
NEWS
November 19, 2011 | By Evan Burgos, FOR THE INQUIRER
HERSHEY - One thing better than winning a championship is being practically perfect while doing it. And Conestoga, it can now say, was practically perfect in 2011. The Pioneers topped Upper St. Clair, 1-0, to win the PIAA Class AAA state boys' soccer championship Saturday night at Hersheypark Stadium. The win completes an undefeated season in which the Pioneers went 24-0-1, with a tie to Shipley on Oct. 22. When the final whistle blew, the team took to the stands, where a raucous, vuvuzela-blowing, cowbell-ringing crowd embraced the school's first boys' soccer state champions since 1988.
NEWS
January 28, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
The TV ads take pains to point out the similarities between "Edge of Darkness" and "Taken," a huge sleeper hit this time last year. Could be the start of a new midwinter movie tradition - during the coldest and darkest days of the year, we all get to warm our hands over a barrel of flaming whup-ass. You can get good and toasty watching "Edge of Darkness," with Mel Gibson in the Liam Neeson role of avenging dad, a man (to paraphrase "Taken") whose particular set of skills make him a nightmare for the people who mess with his daughter.
NEWS
September 29, 2008
IN RESPONSE to your recent editorial on the murder of Philadelphia Police Officer Patrick McDonald, I would like to ask what exactly you're referring to when you suggest that this brutal cold-blooded murder represents a "battle of haves versus have-nots. " Are the editors at the Daily News so unconsciously caught up in a Marxist interpretation of history that every conflict the paper covers is ultimately seen through the lens of a perpetual conflict between classes with opposing interests, rather than - as most of your readers see the world - as individuals with moral agency freely making decisions each and every day of their lives?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2003 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The trouble with Young Turks is that those radicals who bring down regimes inevitably grow middle-aged and establishment. So it is with the directors interviewed in A Decade Under the Influence, one of two new documentaries about how the rock-and-roll generation changed Hollywood. (The other is Easy Riders, Raging Bulls, taken from Peter Biskind's book, and has no scheduled release date.) Today Robert Altman, Francis Ford Coppola and Martin Scorsese - to name some of the lean and hungry revolutionaries who stormed the Hollywood gates 30 years ago - radiate the discreet charm of the ruling class.
NEWS
September 12, 2002
I DON't often agree with columnist Michael Smerconish, but I am more hopeful of a positive solution knowing that an influential white conservative supports some form of reparations. Your agreeing that there is disparity in the standard of living between whites and blacks in America is on target. Infant mortality, education, income, crime, and long-term health care are all barriers to black families' success. We are way behind whites in all respects. Please continue to spread the word on getting fathers more involved in their children's lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1995 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
From the Ealing Studio comedies to the barbs hurled by the Monty Python troupe, savage attacks on the English class system have been a staple of British screen comedy. Peter Medak's The Ruling Class was made in 1972, but it's not dated because the ruling class is still alive and well. Peter Barnes adapted his own play and gave Peter O'Toole a heavy cross to bear as the 14th Earl of Gurney. The earl thinks he's Jesus Christ and spends some of his time in a trance on the cross he totes around.
NEWS
December 18, 1994 | By Jeff Eckhoff, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Charging that Montgomery County's new procedures governing class-action property tax appeals amount to "illegal stumbling blocks" to a taxpayer's right to due process, lawyers for two groups of property owners have filed suit, asking that the procedures be scrapped. The lawsuits, filed over the last 10 days, one in Common Pleas Court and the other in Commonwealth Court, allege that the assessment board overstepped its authority in drafting the class-action procedures that it approved Nov. 17. The suits seek court orders overturning the rules and ordering the assessment board to begin immediate hearings on the class-action appeals, which, if successful, could take several hundred thousand dollars from county, municipal and school district coffers.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|