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Rupert Murdoch

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NEWS
July 20, 2011
YOU MAY KNOW RUPERT MURDOCH FROM FOX NEWS or the News of the World hacking scandal in the U.K., but the media magnate is the helmsman of a vast empire of newspapers, magazines, TV stations and book publishers. * 1953: Leaving Oxford University, Australian-born Murdoch takes over a newspaper in Adelaide, Australia, after death of his father, newspaperman Sir Keith Murdoch, later expanding his holdings into a newspaper chain. * 1968: Begins his British media acquisitions with the purchase of the News of the World . * 1969: Purchases British daily the Sun . * 1973: Buys his first U.S. paper, a daily in San Antonio.
NEWS
May 9, 1988 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
There used to be a sense of kinship between this newspaper and the old New York Post, both born poor but always managing to do more with less. In his book, "Read All About It," journalistic nomad Sid Zion recalled an incident that zanily illustrated the Post's chronic impoverishment. Joe Kahn, a fine investigative reporter, was just finishing his shift when he got a call from a guy who was about to depart this cruel world by diving off the George Washington Bridge. The caller insisted he couldn't be dissuaded, but first he wanted to pour out his reasons to Kahn.
NEWS
November 7, 1995 | by Ellen Gray, Daily News Staff Writer
Early in tonight's "Frontline" presentation "Who's Afraid of Rupert Murdoch?" we learn that the subject of the piece has refused to cooperate, telling correspondent Ken Auletta he "distrusted PBS. " Say what you want about the guy, he's not stupid. But as senior producer Michael Sullivan told television critics this summer, "Frontline" has found that it's "quite capable of doing a very good job without the main character interviewing with us. " (The example he cited, Rush Limbaugh, probably doesn't trust PBS, either.
NEWS
August 14, 2007
THE RECENT SALE OF Dow Jones, the publisher of the Wall Street Journal, to media shark Rupert Murdoch has raised a lot of questions about media consolidation - questions that, unfortunately, too many news outlets weren't willing to look at until it became clear that they, too, could be chum for News Corp. America's media aren't completely controlled by one person or group, but it is undeniable that we're on that course. Last year, Knight Ridder, the former owner of this paper and publisher of 31 other newspapers, went up for sale, and the growing conglomerate vultures were circling.
NEWS
August 14, 2007
THE RECENT SALE OF Dow Jones, the publisher of the Wall Street Journal, to media shark Rupert Murdoch has raised a lot of questions about media consolidation - questions that, unfortunately, too many news outlets weren't willing to look at until it became clear that they, too, could be chum for News Corp. America's media aren't completely controlled by one person or group, but it is undeniable that we're on that course. Last year, Knight Ridder, the former owner of this paper and publisher of 31 other newspapers, went up for sale, and the growing conglomerate vultures were circling.
NEWS
July 20, 2011
TODAY, the eye of the Rupert Murdoch phone-hacking storm in the United Kingdom moves directly over recently elected Prime Minister David Cameron. Cameron will address a special session of Parliament as officials try to unravel a phone-hacking and bribery scandal at Murdoch's now-defunct tabloid, News of the World . Also, Cameron is expected to face tough questions over his ties to Murdoch and Cameron's hiring of former News of the World editor Andy Coulson as a communications chief.
NEWS
September 30, 1993 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
After saying he no longer wanted to buy the impoverished, strikebound New York Post, Rupert Murdoch changed his mind and reached agreement yesterday with eight craft unions, which agreed to come back to work today. The Post has not published since the Newspaper Guild, which represents editorial workers, struck Monday and the craft unions refused to cross the picket line. The Guild was not included in yesterday's agreement. Barry Lipton, president of the Guild's New York chapter, said he still did not believe the other unions' rank-and-file members would cross the Guild's picket line.
NEWS
February 20, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
LONDON - The successor to Rupert Murdoch's scandal-tarnished News of the World newspaper will start publication in a week, a senior News Corp. executive said yesterday. In an email to staff, News International CEO Tom Mockridge said that Murdoch himself would be staying in the British capital to oversee the launch of the Sun on Sunday . The Sun on Sunday will replace the top-selling News of the World , which was closed in July after revelations that members of its staff had routinely hacked into phones and paid bribes to score exclusives.
NEWS
December 3, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
NO ONE COULD get Irv Borowsky to admit that he had any regrets over losing $3 billion. In fact, knowing what kind of a guy Irv Borowsky was, it wouldn't have been surprising to discover that he actually got a rueful chuckle when he learned that Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. paid that price for the company that owned TV Guide in 1988. After all, Irv started a publication in Philadelphia that ultimately morphed into TV Guide, one of the world's richest magazines. Irv's publication, TV Digest, started in 1948 to list local TV programs, was sold to Walter Annenberg in 1952 for $300,000, half for him and half for his brother Arthur, plus $300 a week for 15 years.
NEWS
July 19, 2011 | By Jill Lawless and Cassandra Vinograd, Associated Press
LONDON - Scotland Yard's assistant commissioner resigned Monday, a day after his boss also quit, and fresh investigations of possible police wrongdoing were launched in the phone-hacking scandal that has spread from Rupert Murdoch's media empire to the British prime minister's office. Prime Minister David Cameron called an emergency session of Parliament on the scandal and cut short his visit to Africa to try to contain the widening crisis. Lawmakers on Tuesday are to question Murdoch, his son James, and Rebekah Brooks, the former chief executive of Murdoch's U.K. newspaper arm. In a further twist, Sean Hoare, a former News of the World reporter who helped blow the whistle on the scandal was found dead Monday in his home, but the death was not believed to be suspicious.
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NEWS
February 6, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Olivier's erotic letters "I woke raging with desire for you," writes the greatest Shakespearean actor of the 20th Century in a scorching, randy, salacious letter to his lover Vivien Leigh . "Oh dear God how I did want you. " Laurence Olivier 's missive is part of a cache of 200 previously unpublished letters between the two lovers that is to be made public. Explicit, anatomical, and yet somehow also poetic, most of the letters, held in the Victoria and Albert Museum archive, can't be printed here.
NEWS
December 5, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Irvin J. Borowsky, 90, of Philadelphia, a television-industry visionary, publisher, and philanthropist, died Tuesday, Nov. 25, of causes related to aging at his home. In 1948, Mr. Borowsky started TV Digest, a magazine that listed programs for the 50,000 area residents who at that time had TV sets. He built up the paid circulation to over 300,000 and extended a contract to Channel 6 guaranteeing that if it showed movies - a rarity on TV then - the publication would purchase advertising time on them.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
ALL THOSE reports that Naya Rivera was booted from "Glee" because of an ongoing feud with Lea Michele ? Tone deaf. "There is no truth to the rumor Naya has been fired from the show," Fox TV noted in a statement released to the Associated Press on Saturday night. "She remains under contract to 'Glee.' " Rivera plays Santana Lopez, a lesbian glee-club member. The show's fifth-season finale is set to air May 20. Show co-creator Ryan Murphy has said that the series' sixth season will be its last.
NEWS
November 14, 2012 | By Robert Barr, Associated Press
LONDON - Few seem to be enjoying the management meltdown at the venerable BBC more than Rupert Murdoch, the News Corp. chief whose rival British newspapers have been caught up in their own lengthy, embarrassing, and expensive phone-hacking scandal. But the troubles for both media organizations highlight the fact that the news industry in Britain is at rock bottom in public esteem, and could face increased restrictions from the government of Prime Minister David Cameron, which appears convinced that the industry has been unable to police itself.
NEWS
August 27, 2012
By Llewellyn King Just what is being cooked up by New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg; Rupert Murdoch, the world's most successful multimedia mogul; and Bill Daley, the Chicago businessman who once sat at the right hand of power as President Obama's chief of staff? This unlikely trio has been on the road calling for more immigration. They see it as the only solution to America's problems, and their text is taken from a new study conducted by the Partnership for a New American Economy.
NEWS
June 17, 2012 | Freelance
Dial M for Murdoch News Corporation and the Corruption of Britain By Tom Watson and Martin Hickman Blue Rider Press/Penguin Group. 360 pp. $26.95 Reviewed by Steve Weinberg For the last six years, day after day, news consumers have been bombarded with coverage of media magnate Rupert Murdoch and his media properties (especially News of the World), besieged by charges of unethical and illegal behavior. Because the scandal has played out largely in London and the rest of England, many of the players are relatively unfamiliar to news consumers in the Philadelphia metropolitan area and the remainder of the United States.
NEWS
June 15, 2012 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - He'd already admitted that relations were too tight between politicians and Rupert Murdoch's media empire. But on Thursday, British Prime Minister David Cameron sat under oath, on the witness stand, answering questions and listening poker-faced as embarrassing evidence of his own coziness was read out loud in court. The grilling, in which a judge and the investigating lawyer often addressed him as "Mr. Cameron" and not "Prime Minister," was the latest chapter in a judicial inquiry on media ethics that he himself had initiated in light of Britain's phone-hacking scandal.
NEWS
May 16, 2012 | By David Stringer, Associated Press
LONDON - One of Rupert Murdoch's most trusted lieutenants and five people close to her were charged Tuesday with conspiring to hide evidence of phone hacking, bringing the scandal that has raged across Britain's media and political elite uncomfortably close to Prime Minister David Cameron. The charges against former tabloid editor Rebekah Brooks, her husband, Charlie, and four aides are the first prosecutions since police reopened inquiries 18 months ago into wrongdoing by the country's scandal-hungry press.
NEWS
April 27, 2012 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - Rupert Murdoch apologized Thursday for the phone-hacking scandal that has tarnished his global media empire, declaring: "The buck stops with me. " But he also blamed underlings at News Corp. for keeping him in the dark and trying to keep a lid on evidence of widespread hacking at the News of the World tabloid, which he shut down in July when the scandal broke wide open. On his second day testifying before a British judicial inquiry on media ethics, the Australian-born tycoon said he had spent "hundreds of millions of dollars" on the legal fallout of the hacking allegations and on cleaning up his newspapers.
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