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NEWS
July 2, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
The City of Philadelphia won't ban rush-hour protests during the Democratic National Convention after all. And officials are granting a permit for a protest march down South Broad Street on the convention's opening day, all as part of settling a lawsuit filed last week by the Pennsylvania chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union. Cheri Honkala, the longtime activist who heads a group called the Poor People's Economic Human Rights Campaign, had sought a permit to march from City Hall to the Wells Fargo Center beginning at 3 p.m. July 25, the convention's opening day. The city at first denied the request, saying protests would be banned during rush hour - a ban the ACLU argued posed an overwhelming limit on First Amendment rights.
NEWS
February 7, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A fatal accident in Moorestown is causing heavy delays on Route 38 at rush hour, near the stretch of highway where the female driver died around 1:30 p.m., police said. In the single-vehicle accident, a woman driving alone and heading eastbound on Route 38 between Fellowship Road and Moorestown-Mount Laurel Road veered off the road and struck a pole and several signs before striking a second pole and coming to a stop. When Moorestown police arrived minutes later, Lt. Lee Lieber said, the driver was dead at the scene.
NEWS
September 20, 2011 | Staff Report
Blame it on the rain - from Aug. 14. A previously rained-out Phillies game rescheduled for 1:05 p.m. today at Citizens Bank Park could cause traffic havoc during the evening rush hour because it could coincide with - you guessed it - more rain. Phillies fans should be leaving the park some time after 4 p.m. The release of about 43,000 fans into the traffic stream is normally enough to impact the commute along I-95, the Schuylkill Expressway (I-76) and the Walt Whitman and Ben Franklin bridges.
NEWS
January 29, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
Winter's prolonged toll included overcrowded PATCO trips during rush hour Monday morning - so much so that some travelers could not board the trains. The packed trains became a reality after 7:30 a.m., when several cars' electric motors failed, forcing cancellation of some trips, according to the Delaware River Port Authority. DRPA spokesman Timothy Ireland attributed the motor problems to accumulated snow in the engines, which can cause short circuits when it melts and freezes. Ireland said the circumstances were not unusual given the weather.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By Mari A. Schaefer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A newborn, clearly in a hurry during rush hour, was delivered this morning morning in a car on the Pennsylvania Turnpike. According to state police at the King of Prussia Barracks, the unidentified parents were on their way to the hospital. They pulled over and called for assistance around 7:24 a.m., police said. The full-term baby boy was delivered inside the blue Toyota Prius which stopped at milemarker 336.7 on the westbound lanes in Whitemarsh Township. The mother and infant were transported by Ambler EMS to Albert Einstein Medical Center, police said.
NEWS
August 2, 2013 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
If the Blue Route seems packed now, just imagine what it will be like in 2040, when the region's population has grown by 600,000 people, an 11.5 percent bump. More cars. More Shore traffic on Friday nights in summer. More logjams when the Phillies are in town. But relief may be on the way. Regional planners are floating a plan to convert the shoulders of I-476 during rush hour, easing traffic flow during the busiest times without spending money to widen the road. During peak hours in the morning and afternoon, vehicles would be allowed to drive on the shoulder, creating a bonus lane for the estimated 90,000 drivers that use the road each day. The plan was mentioned in a recent report on managing growth from the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission.
NEWS
June 25, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
The American Civil Liberties Union sued the City of Philadelphia in federal court Thursday over denial of a permit for a protest march down Broad Street on the opening day of the Democratic National Convention. The suit comes five weeks after longtime activist Cheri Honkala, who heads a group known as the Poor People's Economic Human Rights Campaign, sought a permit to march from City Hall to the Wells Fargo Center beginning at 3 p.m. July 25. Honkala, who aims to highlight the plight of the homeless, said she thinks officials want to create a "festival" atmosphere here during the July 25-28 convention.
NEWS
December 3, 1992 | For The Inquirer / MARK STEIN
A Deptford woman was trapped for 40 minutes last night after her car struck a tractor-trailer on Route 47 during rush hour in Deptford. Marilyn Paullin, 58, was in critical but stable condition at Cooper Hospital-University Medical Center last night. Traffic had to be detoured off Route 47 for about an hour.
NEWS
March 5, 2013 | Breaking News Desk
A truck carrying mail this morning lost its load on Route 611 in Warrington, Bucks County. The accident at Rout 611 and Bristol Road occurred shortly after 7 a.m. and during the start of rush hour, hampering local traffic. Only one lane was getting by as crews at the scene worked to remove the truck and gather the mail. Hundreds of pieces of the multi-colored envelopes and other mail scattered across several lanes.
NEWS
June 17, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
The American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania has some questions about how the city will handle protesters during the Democratic National Convention. Will protesters without a permit be arrested? Will the city really forbid marches on Broad Street? And what happens if thousands try to stay overnight in FDR Park? Less than two months out from the convention, the organization sent a letter to Mayor Kenney on Wednesday seeking answers on how protesters will be treated. The city responded the same day. "This is about clarity," said Mary Catherine Roper, the organizations's deputy legal director.
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NEWS
July 8, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
Here is some advice on how to avoid the Regional Rail chaos. Tag-team transit. No need to stick to one mode of transportation. If you live near a Regional Rail station, take advantage of 40 percent off Uber rides to and from the stop - through Sept. 5 - and take the car-pooled ride to your nearest subway or trolley stop. The Norristown Elm Street Station is just a six-minute drive from the Norristown High Speed Line stop, Fox Chase is about 16 minutes from the Broad Street Line, Elwyn about five minutes from Media for the Route 101 trolley, and Trenton 30 to 40 minutes from Frankford Transportation Center.
NEWS
July 2, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
The City of Philadelphia won't ban rush-hour protests during the Democratic National Convention after all. And officials are granting a permit for a protest march down South Broad Street on the convention's opening day, all as part of settling a lawsuit filed last week by the Pennsylvania chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union. Cheri Honkala, the longtime activist who heads a group called the Poor People's Economic Human Rights Campaign, had sought a permit to march from City Hall to the Wells Fargo Center beginning at 3 p.m. July 25, the convention's opening day. The city at first denied the request, saying protests would be banned during rush hour - a ban the ACLU argued posed an overwhelming limit on First Amendment rights.
NEWS
June 25, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
The American Civil Liberties Union sued the City of Philadelphia in federal court Thursday over denial of a permit for a protest march down Broad Street on the opening day of the Democratic National Convention. The suit comes five weeks after longtime activist Cheri Honkala, who heads a group known as the Poor People's Economic Human Rights Campaign, sought a permit to march from City Hall to the Wells Fargo Center beginning at 3 p.m. July 25. Honkala, who aims to highlight the plight of the homeless, said she thinks officials want to create a "festival" atmosphere here during the July 25-28 convention.
NEWS
June 17, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
The American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania has some questions about how the city will handle protesters during the Democratic National Convention. Will protesters without a permit be arrested? Will the city really forbid marches on Broad Street? And what happens if thousands try to stay overnight in FDR Park? Less than two months out from the convention, the organization sent a letter to Mayor Kenney on Wednesday seeking answers on how protesters will be treated. The city responded the same day. "This is about clarity," said Mary Catherine Roper, the organizations's deputy legal director.
NEWS
March 14, 2016
David Karen is a professor of sociology at Bryn Mawr College By law and in practice, drivers and bike riders are ostensibly committed to sharing the road as fellow vehicles. My recent experience suggests that we must abandon this strategy: Drivers need to treat bicyclists like they treat pedestrians. Having cut my driving teeth on getting into the Midtown Tunnel in New York City at rush hour, I have grown up to be a very aware - some might say aggressive, but let's agree on very engaged - driver for the last 45 years.
NEWS
January 7, 2016 | By Robert Moran, STAFF WRITER
SEPTA's regional rail travel got jammed in Center City Tuesday afternoon after a report of smoke in a train caused rush-hour delays of up to an hour. Smoke was reportedly being emitted from overhead equipment on a Warminster Line train between Jefferson Station and 30th Street Station about 5:50 p.m., said SEPTA spokesman Andrew Busch. The train arrived at 30th Street and the passengers were evacuated. The train was placed out of service for investigation. Commuters reported hearing at an announcement at Jefferson Station suggesting they find alternative transportation.
NEWS
February 27, 2015 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
FEW THINGS in daily life are scarier than being trapped on a train with no heat or power that's draped with live wires. Except maybe a puddle of unidentified goo on the seat or the floor, but this story is not about that. Instead, about 500 rush-hour commuters found themselves stranded on SEPTA's Warminster Line after the live wire came down on the Center City-bound train just before 8:15 a.m. south of the Roslyn Station in Montgomery County. The passengers kept their cool - and their sense of humor - until SEPTA was able to scramble a "rescue train" to the disabled train to retrieve the marooned riders.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2015 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Why has Chris Tucker, big-screen comic foil, been crisscrossing the country doing stand-up shows? This is a guy who at the height of his popularity, when the Rush Hour movies made him for a time the highest-paid actor in Hollywood, never worked a day more than he had to. As he explained at the Tower Theater on Friday night, he owes a towering sum in back taxes. He joked that IRS agents were backstage as he performed, tallying the box office and eating chicken. His tax troubles are both the impetus and the foundation of his act. He complained about TMZ reporting his debt as more than $14 million.
NEWS
January 27, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
A storm forecasters warned could become a "crippling and potentially historic blizzard" for New York City and New England might dump as much as two feet of snow around the Philadelphia region. The wintry blast was expected to begin softly overnight into Monday morning, with one to three inches of snow certain to complicate the early rush hour. The National Weather Service said a second, behemoth storm would arrive Monday evening, slamming the region with 14 to 24 inches into Tuesday, with wind gusts as high as 30 m.p.h.
NEWS
February 12, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum and Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writers
PATCO officials have started a "lessons learned" session on Monday afternoons to figure out how to improve service on the troubled commuter line between South Jersey and Center City. They had plenty to work with Monday. During both the morning and evening rush-hours, trains were disabled on the lone working track on the Ben Franklin Bridge, forcing evacuation of the trains and causing significant delays on a line already slowed by construction. The morning breakdown was over the Delaware River, while the evening failure was on the approach to the bridge on the Philadelphia side.
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