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Rush Hour

NEWS
August 17, 1988 | By Craig S. Palosky, Special to The Inquirer
As officials in Moorestown and Mount Laurel hammer out the final details for a proposed 563-acre luxury development to be built on the border between the two towns, the developers are being asked to provide financing for traffic, water and sewer improvements. According to Harry McVey, Moorestown's community-development director, the Planning Boards in the two townships appear headed toward approving the project proposed by Moorestown Foursome Ltd., which includes 470 homes, more than a million square feet of office space and an 18-hole professional golf course.
NEWS
April 2, 1991 | By John Ellis, Special to The Inquirer
State Police Cpl. Edward Kroll arrived in Montgomery County in the late 1960s as a 25-year-old rookie, sent to patrol a peaceful, quiet stretch of country highway - Route 73 between Worcester and Skippack Townships. Today, Kroll, 48, still patrols the same stretch of asphalt. And he still considers his section of Route 73 to be a country highway. But forget about that peaceful, quiet stuff. "The volume is so heavy at rush hour, you can't speed," Kroll said. "You can tailgate, but it is almost impossible to speed when you are going to work.
NEWS
February 23, 1988 | By RON GOLDWYN, Daily News Staff Writer
Who says you can't get there from here? The Daily News called for a cab yesterday and tried to get stuck in traffic. That's been easy lately. The closing of the Walnut Street bridge to through traffic was the coup de grace, mixing with Schuylkill Expressway repairs, Vine and Market street construction and other Center City projects. By last Friday afternoon, in the rain, city motorists were driven to distraction - but nowhere else. The ingredients for motoring nightmares remained everywhere yesterday.
NEWS
August 2, 2008 | By Joseph A. Gambardello INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
David Lipow, a lawyer, used to take the train from Exton to his office in Center City every day. Six weeks ago, that changed. Now, Lipow is driving to Conshohocken and riding his bike the 13 miles to work on as many days as he can, joining a slowly growing number of people commuting on two wheels under their own power. The reasons are not limited to gas prices hovering around $4 a gallon. Exercise and the joie de vivre of being outdoors regularly top the list. "It's exhilarating and I love it," Lipow said.
NEWS
April 24, 1988 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Route 422 Bypass northwest of Philadelphia can seem a lovely country road - rolling through farmland and woodland, sometimes within sight of the Schuylkill, rolling into western Montgomery County, edging into northern Chester County, ending in southern Berks County. At quiet times - a late morning on a weekday - it is a driver's dream, an uncluttered road with an uncluttered view of the countryside. At hectic times - a late afternoon rush hour - it is a truck-heavy, traffic-thick irritant and frustration for the hurried driver.
NEWS
January 7, 2000 | By Jere Downs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This town is preening for the Republican convention come July. The economy hums. Times are good. But it wouldn't be Philly without something to grumble about. So even though more people than ever think the quality of life in the Philadelphia region is improving, many of them complain of spending too much of these good times stuck in traffic. In a survey coming out today from the civic-minded Greater Philadelphia First, 31 percent of residents - up from 19 percent in 1996 - buoyantly think the area is "getting better.
NEWS
April 29, 1990 | By Alan Sipress, Inquirer Staff Writer
The lunch-time traffic in the Ellisburg Circle was doing the Jersey Weave. It's just a dart to the left and a dodge to the right, a step on the pedal and then pull up tight. Shake your fist in the air and then slide out right. The pundits out front of Ponzio's diner in Cherry Hill were trying to figure out whether there was any choreography to this chaos. Put simply: Who has the right of way? "I don't know," said Barbie Scibal of Linwood. "The standing order is to keep moving.
FOOD
October 11, 2012
AMY KIM / Washington Post
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