CollectionsRussian Children
IN THE NEWS

Russian Children

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 28, 2012 | By Will Englund, Washington Post
Russian President Vladimir V. Putin, acceding to the anti-American fervor that has gripped the country's legislature, said Thursday that he intends to sign a bill barring Americans from adopting Russian children. Various Kremlin officials had criticized the bill, which was designed as a means of retaliation against a new American law that targets corrupt Russian officials, but Putin has chosen not to heed their advice. Having spent the last year stoking hostility toward the United States, he is now faced with an emotional response from the parliament that seems to be on the verge of getting away from him. Though he raised questions about the adoption bill at his annual news conference earlier this month, and Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov and Science and Education Minister Dmitry Livanov, among others, have called it ill-advised, on Thursday Putin said, "I have not seen any reason why I should not sign it. "   'Cannibalistic' bill The journalist Alexander Minkin, on his blog for the Ekho Moskvy website, described the Russian bill as "cannibalistic": With Americans placing sanctions on certain corrupt Russian bureaucrats, he wrote, Moscow strikes back by punishing its own orphans.
NEWS
August 13, 1999 | By Michael Rothfeld, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Debbie Haley peered through the bus windows to catch one last glimpse of Vitali Golishev, 7, and Anya Shevcova, 6, the Russian orphans who for the last five weeks had been her children. It was a morning full of crying for Haley, 40, and the host parents of eight other children who returned to Russia last week after spending the summer in West Chester. "It's very hard to say goodbye to the kids and think you might never see them again," Haley said. By bringing 209 Russian children to visit the United States this year, Kidsave International, the group sponsoring the program, hopes to introduce them to potential adoptive parents.
NEWS
January 31, 1995 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Tearfully, she looked at Polaroid photos of a baby girl. After two years of trying to have a baby, Gail Recht and her husband, Steven, had decided on another way to become parents. Now they were in the home of a adoption matchmaker who has made it her cause to reach inside Russia and other countries to find children for area families. "Do you like her?" asked Barbara Harle, director of CARE, the Childrens Adoption Referral Exchange. "You have to be happy. " For the Rechts, who had traveled from Long Island to meet with Harle, there was no question.
NEWS
April 23, 2013 | By Carolyn Davis and Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writers
A teenager says his parents treated him badly, hassling him about little things until they finally kicked him out of the house, forcing him to sleep in a culvert. His parents describe a willful young man who ignored house rules, disrespected teachers and others, and chose to leave. It's a scenario that plays out in communities across the United States. In this instance, the troubles between a Collegeville couple - Jackie and Steve Salotti - and their son became an international incident when Russia framed it as an example of Americans mistreating adoptive Russian children.
NEWS
January 14, 2013 | By Lynn Berry, Associated Press
MOSCOW - Thousands of people marched through Moscow on Sunday to protest Russia's new law banning Americans from adopting Russian children, a far bigger number than expected in a sign that outrage over the ban has breathed some life into the dispirited anti-Kremlin opposition movement. Shouting "shame on the scum," protesters carried posters of President Vladimir Putin and members of Russia's parliament who overwhelmingly voted for the law last month. Up to 20,000 took part in the demonstration on a frigid, gray afternoon.
NEWS
January 16, 1986
I am a native born American citizen. My parents are native born American citizens, but my grandparents (like many people) were naturalized citizens. It is not so long ago that they and others immigrated to this country, is it? We are privileged to live in a "free" country, a country that is peopled by many nations, an understanding country that has accepted the poor, the tired, the huddled masses. That is how America started and thrived, isn't it? Then are we turning back time?
NEWS
December 21, 2012 | By Michael Birnbaum, Washington Post
MOSCOW - Russian President Vladimir V. Putin countered tough questions Thursday about a proposal to ban U.S. adoptions of Russian children by directing harsh criticism at the U.S. government, but he refused to say clearly whether he would approve the legislation. The proposal, which lawmakers say will be on his desk within a week, is a retaliation for a new U.S. law that takes action against Russian human-rights violators. Putin - who appears caught between the actions of hot-headed allies in parliament and members of his cabinet who say the ban would penalize Russian children while doing little to strike back at U.S. lawmakers - called it "an emotional response" but said it was "appropriate.
NEWS
July 11, 2012 | By Nataliya Vasilyeva, Associated Press
MOSCOW - Russia's parliament Tuesday ratified a long-awaited agreement with the United States regulating the adoption of Russian children by Americans. The ratification by a 244-96-2 vote in the State Duma came a year after the two countries worked out the agreement. Russian officials have long complained about the abuse and even killings of children by their adoptive parents - saying at least 19 Russian adoptive children have died at their American parents' hands. The issue came to a head in April 2010 when an American adoptive mother sent her 7-year-old boy back to Russia on a one-way ticket, saying he had behavioral problems.
NEWS
July 1, 1999 | By Michael Rothfeld, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
They waited expectantly at Julie Sim's house - children with U.S. flags, heart-shape cutouts, and welcome signs in Russian; adults chatting with arms folded, feet tapping, cameras ready for their arriving children. "What's more nerve-racking?" asked Linda Fratantoni, talking out back on the deck. "Having your own, or having this?" Then came a shout. "There's a bus coming this way," Debbie Haley, 40, called out. And everyone ran to greet the 10 Russian orphans, ages 5 to 11, who arrived in Chester County for the summer yesterday evening after a full day's journey by plane and bus. On arrival, they pressed hands and noses to the glass.
NEWS
December 29, 2012 | By Carolyn Davis and Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writers
Update: This story was published before Russian President Vladimir V. Putin signed a bill Friday that bans Americans from adopting Russian children. *** Little children entangled in a big, bad political brawl between Moscow and Washington. That's how a Wynnewood adoption agency, a Burlington County family who adopted a child from Russia, and an international adoption expert describe the possibility that Russia will ban Americans from adopting children. Russian President Vladimir V. Putin said this week that he will sign the ban, which the country's legislative chambers recently passed.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 18, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
For a while, Jody Johnson was hopeful. She kept the clothes and toys she had bought for Oksana, the young Russian girl with Down syndrome she planned to adopt. Johnson, a divorced mother from Lansdale, listened in on conference calls with U.S. officials and corresponded with other families who felt as abandoned as the children they were forced to leave behind. But a year after President Vladimir V. Putin signed legislation banning the adoption of Russian children by Americans, families such as Johnson's have been forced to change course, albeit reluctantly.
NEWS
July 13, 2013 | By Will Englund, Washington Post
MOSCOW - A Russian court wrapped up the trial of a dead man Thursday, finding whistle-blower Sergei Magnitsky guilty of fraud but waiving a sentence on the grounds that his life ended while he was imprisoned. Magnitsky was a lawyer who unearthed a $230 million fraud by police and tax officials, but he was arrested and charged with perpetrating the fraud himself. He died in a Moscow prison in 2009, apparently after a severe beating. Outrage over his case inspired a U.S. law placing financial and visa sanctions on corrupt Russian officials, which in turn led to a Russian law banning American adoptions of Russian children.
NEWS
April 23, 2013 | By Carolyn Davis and Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writers
A teenager says his parents treated him badly, hassling him about little things until they finally kicked him out of the house, forcing him to sleep in a culvert. His parents describe a willful young man who ignored house rules, disrespected teachers and others, and chose to leave. It's a scenario that plays out in communities across the United States. In this instance, the troubles between a Collegeville couple - Jackie and Steve Salotti - and their son became an international incident when Russia framed it as an example of Americans mistreating adoptive Russian children.
NEWS
April 15, 2013 | By Jim Heintz, Associated Press
MOSCOW - Russia on Saturday banned 18 Americans from entering the country in response to Washington imposing sanctions on 18 Russians for alleged human rights violations. The list released by the Foreign Ministry includes John Yoo, a former Justice Department official who wrote legal memos authorizing harsh interrogation techniques; David Addington, the chief of staff for former Vice President Dick Cheney; and two former commanders of the Guantanamo Bay detention center: retired Maj. Gen. Geoffrey Miller and Adm. Jeffrey Harbeson.
NEWS
March 28, 2013 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sam Salotti, 19, woke up Tuesday to a Facebook message from a woman who said she was an editor with Russia's state-run Channel One. The channel was planning a show about Salotti's adoptive brother, Josh, 18, who returned to Russia late last year after a tumultuous stay with the Collegeville couple who adopted the pair six years ago. Josh Salotti, now going by the name Alexander Abnosov, sparked an uproar in Russia by accusing his and Sam's adoptive...
NEWS
March 27, 2013 | By Robert Moran, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sam Salotti, 19, woke up Tuesday to a Facebook message from a woman who said she was an editor with Russia's state-run Channel One. The channel was planning a show about Salotti's adoptive brother, Josh, 18, who returned to Russia late last year after a tumultuous stay with the Collegeville couple who adopted the pair six years ago. Josh Salotti, now going by the name Alexander Abnosov, sparked an uproar in Russia by accusing his and Sam's adoptive...
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By Jim Heintz, Associated Press
MOSCOW - After weeks of anxiety plodding through the opaque Russian legal system, two U.S. women have custody of their adopted Russian children and are preparing to take them home to start a new life together. Jeana Bonner of South Jordan, Utah, and Rebecca Preece of Nampa, Idaho, told the Associated Press on Saturday about the expenses, the confusion, and emotional swings they have gone through since arriving in Moscow in mid-January, expecting to quickly leave with their children, both of whom have Down syndrome.
NEWS
January 24, 2013
JERUSALEM - Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu emerged weakened and facing a redrawn political map Tuesday after Israeli television projections showed a surge for a new centrist party, Yesh Atid, in Israel's elections, making it a key element of a future coalition. The surprise result, according to the projections, was the surge to 19 seats of Yesh Atid, or There is a Future. Its leader, Yair Lapid, a former television anchorman, based his campaign on a demand to end the exemption of tens of thousands of ultra-Orthodox Jews from compulsory military service so that they can pursue religious studies with government stipends.
NEWS
January 23, 2013
Children leave Russia for U.S. MOSCOW - Some of the Russian children caught in limbo by their country's ban on adoptions by Americans have left for the United States with their new parents, the U.S. Embassy in Moscow said Wednesday. The confirmation from press attaché Joseph Kruzich was the first official word that any of the 46 children had been allowed to leave Russia. Kruzich did not say how many of the children had already left, but it was clear that all of these adoptions could now go forward, bringing huge relief to the children's would-be parents in America.
NEWS
January 14, 2013 | By Lynn Berry, Associated Press
MOSCOW - Thousands of people marched through Moscow on Sunday to protest Russia's new law banning Americans from adopting Russian children, a far bigger number than expected in a sign that outrage over the ban has breathed some life into the dispirited anti-Kremlin opposition movement. Shouting "shame on the scum," protesters carried posters of President Vladimir Putin and members of Russia's parliament who overwhelmingly voted for the law last month. Up to 20,000 took part in the demonstration on a frigid, gray afternoon.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|