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LIVING
October 25, 1987 | By Dan Gutman, Special to The Inquirer
An electronic bulletin board concerning AIDS has started up in San Francisco. You can dial up the system and read articles, theories, statistics, political data and other information on the subject. Set your computer to dial 415-626-1246. Apple, in cooperation with Dow Jones & Co., has begun shipping Desktop Express. This is an electronic mail system that allows Macintosh users to send and receive graphics and text over the MCI Mail network. It sells for $149. Computer games, which were pronounced dead several years ago, are back in vogue.
NEWS
July 14, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
I've got some foreign policy good news. Really. Never mind that U.S. foreign policy appears irrelevant in Gaza, spineless in Syria, irresponsible in Iraq, and grossly stupid in Germany (whoever OKd our dumb spy efforts there should be fired). There is one important country where U.S. efforts may yet achieve a positive outcome. I'm talking about Ukraine, where Russia's Vladimir Putin has just blinked in his efforts to dismantle the country - in large part because Western sanctions (even mild ones)
NEWS
December 11, 1988 | By John Ellis, Special to The Inquirer
It was an awkward situation for Sophia Wisniewska. The conversation had just turned to profit-sharing, and the Hatboro resident was at a loss for words. Not that Wisniewska couldn't debate the merits of profit-sharing, she just couldn't think of the Russian language translation for the American word. As a pierovodchik, or interpreter, it was Wisniewska's job to keep conversation going at the recently concluded U.S.-U.S.S.R. Emerging Leaders Summit. "The vocabulary became more difficult as the groups became more comfortable with each other," said Wisniewska, 36. The summit, which brought together 185 Soviet and 179 American delegates, was designed to forge strong ties between the next generation of leaders in both countries.
NEWS
April 30, 1992 | by Leigh Jackson, Daily News Staff Writer
This is a story about the indomitable spirit of immigrants, and about getting to know a foreign country and succeeding in it. This is also a story about food. For one man, the story begins 13 years ago, among the cans and produce of a supermarket in the Northeast. That is where Gregory Taits, now 45, found himself on the second day of his new life in Philadelphia. Taits, now a real estate agent and radio talk show host, had come to Philadelphia with his wife and daughter from Riga, Latvia.
NEWS
March 30, 1992 | By Martha Woodall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Every school-day morning, Clint Ely opens the back of his 1988 tomato-red Toyota hatchback to double-check his teaching materials. He makes sure he has his books, tapes, videocassettes, posters, individual chalkboards, and Russian-language Monopoly game. Ely has taught Russian to high school students since 1959. But because of dwindling enrollments, he has been forced to take his instructional program on the road. He rides a circuit among three area independent schools, teaching Russian to a grand total of 16 students.
NEWS
June 21, 1992 | By Carol Morello, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Behind its glass facade pasted with stickers for politicians and parties, the Zohar Hotel is bubbling with molten anger. Walk into the Spartan lobby where litter rolls with the breeze from the doorway like so much tumbleweed, and a dozen elderly Russian Jews warehoused there spring up from their chairs, hoping that a stranger, any stranger, might be there to help. "We live in poor conditions," one says. "The elevator doesn't work," interrupts another. The litany continues: no ventilation, no air conditioning, no mail, no refrigerators, only one pay telephone that works.
NEWS
December 29, 1991 | By Kathryn Quigley, Special to The Inquirer
For $39, high school students in Morrisville Borough can get a personalized guide to college financial aid that can cost hundreds of dollars. The school district is able to offer the reduced rate because of corporate contributions that have also underwritten a new scoreboard for the football field, microscopes for the advanced-placement biology students, new chairs for the teachers in the high school and even a weekly after-school class in...
NEWS
November 16, 1989 | By Lisa Scheid, Special to The Inquirer
Make room for the preschoolers. That is what Octorara Area School District officials say they will have to do next year. According to a federal law passed two years ago, 2- to 5-year-olds must be included in special education programs by the 1990-91 school year. For Octorara, that will mean making room for six to 15 new students in the already overcrowded Octorara elementary school, superintendent Richard P. McAdams told the school board Monday. To accommodate the new students, the school board agreed with McAdams' recommendation to turn the school's music room into a preschool special education classroom.
NEWS
June 4, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Vladimir Posner, a Soviet television commentator, said yesterday that his government's jamming of Western radio broadcasts was "counterproductive" and actually attracted undue attention to the programs. Posner, appearing before the American Enterprise Institute, also said that the Soviet military intervention in Afghanistan was not popular with everyone at home. Posner, who frequently appears on American television to give Soviet views on international issues, said the jamming was done because some programs broadcast into the Soviet Union in Russian and other languages were "subversive.
NEWS
June 22, 2000 | By George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The owner of a North Jersey ambulance company and his wife were indicted yesterday on allegations that they defrauded state Medicaid programs of more than $200,000. The indictment charges that Gregory Sverdlov, 42, and Raisa Zeltser, 29, submitted phony and inflated bills for transportation and related services. The indictment also charges that they paid kickbacks to those who used their company. Most of the clients were Russian emigres, according to investigators, and the kickbacks included paid subscriptions to a Russian-language cable-television and radio network.
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