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NEWS
November 27, 1989 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a dramatic display of national and religious fervor, an estimated 180,000 Ukrainians yesterday marched and held a public Mass to press demands for the legalization of their outlawed church. The demonstration, held peacefully and without police interference, was the most dramatic illustration yet of the issue expected to be at the center of a historic meeting in Rome on Friday between Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Pope John Paul II. The Pope already has made it clear that he expects Gorbachev to reinstate the Ukrainian Catholic Church, which was outlawed in 1946 and forcibly put under the jurisdiction of the Russian Orthodox Church.
NEWS
August 20, 2000
Sainthood. The Russian Orthodox Church canonized Nicholas II, the last czar, saying he died a martyr when executed by Bolsheviks in 1918. . . Penalized. A defunct Miami jet-repair company, SabreTech, was ordered to pay $11 million for mishandling the cargo of oxygen canisters blamed for causing the 1996 ValuJet crash. . . Men's Waistlines. University of Chicago researchers said there seemed to be a link between the quality of sleep and middle-age spread at the waist and under the chin; decreased sleep means decreased production of growth hormone, they found, which leads to flab.
NEWS
October 5, 1993 | by Marianne Costantinou, Daily News Staff Writer
The talk was of Russia. In the living rooms of Russian immigrants, the TV was tuned to CNN, the 24- hour cable news station, and fingers were poised on the redial button of phones. So many folks called loved ones in Russia that phone lines were jammed and some calls couldn't go through, said Patty Timsom, a spokeswoman for AT&T. Nationwide yesterday, 24,000 calls an hour were placed to Russia, she said, compared with 11,000 during an average hour. On Sunday, when violence broke out, the number of calls was five times higher than average, she said.
NEWS
May 3, 1992 | By Fen Montaigne, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
His code name was "Drozdov. " And over the last 25 years, "Drozdov" surfaced often in KGB reports about high-level agents inside the Russian Orthodox Church. In October 1969, KGB archives show that "Drozdov" went to England for a meeting of the European Conference of Churches, bringing back information "about certain persons of interest to the KGB. " In 1983, a KGB officer reported that "agents 'Drozdov' and 'Rock' did some educational work among the monks at the Pskov-Pechoy monastery.
NEWS
December 1, 1989 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Pope John Paul II and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev meet at the Vatican today, Archbishop Stephen Sulyk will be watching with keen interest. Archbishop Sulyk, head of the Ukrainian Catholic Archdiocese of Philadelphia, was one of three Ukrainian prelates summoned to Rome by the Pope two weeks ago for a special pre-summit meeting. The meeting was of great significance for Ukrainian Catholics because "we had a say about our church, that things are not done behind our back," Archbishop Sulyk said.
NEWS
May 22, 1988 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
Under a law being drafted on freedom of conscience in the Soviet Union, a ban on priests visiting people in hospitals is to be lifted, according to a senior official of the Russian Orthodox Church. Currently, priests in the Soviet Union are permitted only to administer extreme unction to a dying person. Aspects of the new law, which was referred to recently as being in the draft stage by Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev, were revealed during an interview with Archimandrite Gavriil, abbot of the Pechory Monastery.
NEWS
March 29, 1988 | By Steve Goldstein, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Russian Orthodox Church has requested government permission to hold ceremonies celebrating the church's 1,000th anniversary in the famed Bolshoi Theater in June, the party newspaper Izvestia said yesterday. Indications are that approval will be granted, marking a rare convergence of church and state in the Soviet Union, where atheism is the accepted norm. As the millennium of Christianity in the Soviet Union approaches, there are other signs that Communist Party officials might be taking a more relaxed attitude toward the church.
NEWS
January 27, 2000 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an overgrown garden shaded with orange and palm trees, a reprise of the Cold War is playing itself out. It is in fact a fight between two rival Russian churches for control of a monastic compound in the West Bank, but the U.S. and Russian Consulates have been dragged into taking sides. The central player in the drama, an Orthodox nun who has barricaded herself in the compound, is the older sister of President Clinton's former aide George Stephanopoulos. At issue is a rivalry that harks back to the Russian Revolution of 1917, when anti-Bolshevik exiles formed their own church, popularly known as the White Russian church.
LIVING
October 22, 1992 | By W. Speers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story includes information from the Associated Press, Reuters and the New York Post
Billy Graham was welcomed to Moscow yesterday by the head of the Russian Orthodox Church, who also warned him about seeking converts there. "If your desire to help the Russian Orthodox Church is sincere, then you (will) tell the people who have gone through the heaviest spiritual captivity they ought to go back to their spiritual roots," said Patriarch Alexi II. This weekend, Mr. Graham will lead a three-day prayer meeting in Olympic Stadium, the largest such gathering ever in a former communist country.
NEWS
September 5, 1992 | By Fen Montaigne, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Ozark twang of evangelist Cecil Todd rang out in a dingy, cavernous movie theater. "Are you ready?" the Missouri preacher asked 300 Muscovites, adding the warning, "The trumpet will soon sound!" "Hundreds of thousands of Russians are coming to Jesus to be baptized. Soon, very soon, Jesus is coming, and only those who are his children will go to meet him in the sky! Get ready right now!" Dozens of adults and more than 20 twittering children walked behind the stage, donned turquoise baptismal robes and soon found themselves stepping into a fiberglass bathtub under the floodlights.
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NEWS
July 1, 2013
Croatia marks entry into EU ZAGREB, Croatia - Fireworks were ready and champagne was flowing as festive crowds gathered on the streets Sunday to mark Croatia's entry into the European Union, a major milestone 20 years after the country won independence in a bloody war that shook the continent. Croatia became the 28th EU member on Monday, the bloc's first addition since Bulgaria and Romania joined in 2007. Though enthusiasm for the achievement has been dampened by the EU's financial turmoil, it is a historic turning point for the small Balkan nation of 4.2 million, which endured years of carnage after declaring independence from the former Yugoslavia in 1991.
NEWS
December 13, 2012 | By Kathy Lally, Washington Post
MOSCOW - President Vladimir V. Putin delivered his state of the nation address Wednesday, and he made conditions in his country sound enviable - a view immediately rejected by his critics. "We will implement everything we planned," Putin said, describing a Russia committed to democracy, where corruption would be fought, more jobs would be created, affordable housing would be built and pay would be increased. "He has repeated all the unfulfilled promises he has made in the course of his 13 years in power," Vladimir Ryzhkov, an opposition politician, wrote in his blog, pointing out that new points included promises to improve spirituality and collegiality.
NEWS
August 24, 2012
By Tobias Peter This isn't just a story about a punk band. Yes, the three women sentenced to two years in jail last week for criticizing Vladimir Putin are members of a Russian rock group called Pussy Riot. But their case shows not only that there is no freedom of speech in the country, but that life for its people has only gotten worse since Putin was elected president for the third time. The band members were arrested after they stormed the altar at a Russian Orthodox cathedral in Moscow and belted out a "punk prayer" beseeching the Virgin Mary to rid their country of Putin.
NEWS
April 23, 2012 | By Lynn Berry, Associated Press
MOSCOW - Tens of thousands prayed outside Moscow's main cathedral on Sunday to show their support for the Russian Orthodox Church in a controversy over a punk rock protest that has added to political tensions in Russia. Christ the Savior Cathedral was the scene of a brief surprise performance in February by a female punk rock group protesting Vladimir Putin's return to the presidency. Three members of the band Pussy Riot remain in police custody and face up to seven years in prison on charges of hooliganism.
FOOD
April 1, 2010 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marina Zavialova's favorite Easter tradition will take place in the early hours of Sunday morning when Father Athanasy of the Russian Orthodox Church in Fairmount blesses her basket of meats and cheeses. No chocolate bunnies in this Easter basket. Since the Great Schism of 1054 split the Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholic Churches, the two have charted their holy days by different calendars, so their celebrations do not often take place on the same days. But this year, the Eastern Orthodox Julian and Roman Catholic Gregorian calendars do coincide.
NEWS
August 20, 2000
Sainthood. The Russian Orthodox Church canonized Nicholas II, the last czar, saying he died a martyr when executed by Bolsheviks in 1918. . . Penalized. A defunct Miami jet-repair company, SabreTech, was ordered to pay $11 million for mishandling the cargo of oxygen canisters blamed for causing the 1996 ValuJet crash. . . Men's Waistlines. University of Chicago researchers said there seemed to be a link between the quality of sleep and middle-age spread at the waist and under the chin; decreased sleep means decreased production of growth hormone, they found, which leads to flab.
NEWS
January 27, 2000 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an overgrown garden shaded with orange and palm trees, a reprise of the Cold War is playing itself out. It is in fact a fight between two rival Russian churches for control of a monastic compound in the West Bank, but the U.S. and Russian Consulates have been dragged into taking sides. The central player in the drama, an Orthodox nun who has barricaded herself in the compound, is the older sister of President Clinton's former aide George Stephanopoulos. At issue is a rivalry that harks back to the Russian Revolution of 1917, when anti-Bolshevik exiles formed their own church, popularly known as the White Russian church.
NEWS
October 22, 1999 | By John Corr, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The St. Petersburg Choir Community, "Russicum," will be presenting a concert of sacred music and Russian folk songs at 4 p.m. Sunday at the Church of the Loving Shepherd, 1066 S. New St., West Chester. Russicum is five soloists who sing a cappella and who have served as soloists and choir conductors in the Russian Orthodox Church and in Russian opera and philharmonic societies. Members of Russicum say their international tour is aimed at promoting "ecumenical and cultural exchange which builds friendships based on Christian vocal traditions from different countries" and "maintaining the continuity of liturgical music from earlier times to the present.
LIVING
March 16, 1997 | By Mary Beth McCauley, FOR THE INQUIRER
"For if ye forgive others their trespasses, your heavenly Father will also forgive you; but if ye do not forgive others, neither will your Father forgive your trespasses. " - Matthew 6:14-15 'Forgiveness is so characteristic of Christianity that it is central to every Christian's daily prayer," the Lord's Prayer, said Pastor Michael Carlson of Christ's Lutheran Church in Oreland. During Lent, many church members inventory their relationships and try to make amends, he said.
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