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ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2011 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
As Phil Rosenthal sees it, why should he travel 6,000 miles to Moscow to be told he's not funny when he can hear that at home in Los Angeles, without the jet lag? Exporting Raymond , his droll documentary that opens the weeklong Philadelphia CineFest on Thursday night, travels to Russia with the creator of Everybody Loves Raymond . Rosenthal's mission impossible - so long as he is not a victim of K&R (as insurers call kidnap and ransom) - is to assist a television network in translating his beloved sitcom for the Russian market, where Raymond is rechristened Kostya.
NEWS
February 15, 1992 | By Fen Montaigne, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ukraine and two other former Soviet republics yesterday refused to join in a unified military force with Russia and the rest of the new Commonwealth of Independent States, dealing a setback to the new union. At a commonwealth summit meeting, Russia and seven other former Soviet republics agreed to keep transitional, united armed forces for the next two years, but said that in 1994 each state would be free to set up its own army. Moldova and Azerbaijan sided with Ukraine in opposing the unified force.
NEWS
May 22, 1991 | BY MICHAEL LACING, WAYNE
SEEING RED Most popular show on Russian TV is SPOTNIK, where Party members chug a bottle of Vodka and say what they think the spot on Gorbachev's head looks like to them and why. WORST CASE SCENARIO Take a vacation to an isolated island and realize you forgot to pack tapes for Walkman, and that the only cassette on the island is a New Age tape titled "Yanni's Love Lullaby. " WORTH THE PRICE Pay-per-view event I would pay to see: William Conrad and Shelly Winters locked in a room for two days without food.
NEWS
March 24, 1993 | By Fen Montaigne, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The burial of President Boris N. Yeltsin's 84-year-old mother yesterday left his opponents looking less than compassionate for carrying on the battle as he grieved. Klavdiya Yeltsin, who suffered a fatal heart attack Sunday - the day after her son imposed "special rule" on the country - was buried yesterday in Moscow's Kuntsevo Cemetery. She was a little-known figure here, but any true Russian could identify with the photograph flashed on TV screens last night - the plump, deeply lined, friendly face of an archetypical Russian babushka.
NEWS
January 6, 1995
The bloody fighting in Chechnya is claiming more casualties than just the innocent civilians who are dying under Russian bombs. Eyewitness reports of the strafing of orphanages, marketplaces and civilian cars - despite Moscow's false claims of pinpoint bombing - have blackened Russian President Boris Yeltsin's reputation abroad and at home. The coverage by daring Russian TV reporters and cameramen from Grozny has horrified viewers all over Russia (while demonstrating that Russia's free press, at least, hasn't been muzzled)
NEWS
June 17, 1992 | By Fen Montaigne, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin is in America, his staunchest, hard-line opponents at home have raised a ruckus by throwing up a tent city around the national television studio to press their demands. The protest by a motley collection of Russian nationalists, communists and anti-Semites - whose key demand is an hour of air time a day - has created a quandary for Moscow officials. The mayor has declared the tent city illegal, but few people seem to have the desire to clean out the protesters by force and risk making martyrs out of them.
SPORTS
December 1, 2004 | By Don Steinberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three native Russians on the Flyers' roster last season will play in a Russia vs. The World all-star game assembled by Igor Larionov, who is retiring from professional hockey after 27 years in the NHL and Russian leagues. Larionov is making the exhibition game, to be held in Moscow, his farewell celebration. Comcast has signed an exclusive deal to televise the game nationally on its many local sports and news channels. CN8 will carry the game in the Philadelphia region - Dec. 13 at 8 p.m. - and will produce the U.S. end of the broadcast, adding English graphics and announcers to the Russian TV feed.
NEWS
June 7, 2000 | by Dan Gross, For the Daily News
Humor Publication Described As Funny As Hell: This is the type of headline you could expect to find on the Madison, Wis.-based satire paper, The Onion. The paper, which calls itself "America's Finest News Source," is published weekly, both in a print format - mainly distributed in Madison, Milwaukee, Chicago and Denver - and on the Internet at www.theonion.com. Between the two media, the Onion, founded in 1988, is read by more than a million people per week. The Onion's stories are fake but disguised as actual news items.
NEWS
December 15, 1993 | By TRUDY RUBIN
I used to wonder what it would have been like to be a foreign correspondent in Europe in the 1930s. Would I have instantly understood the meaning of the German elections in 1933? Would Adolf the clown have been recognizable in 1929 as Hitler the future Fuehrer? The question has become painfully relevant in Moscow this week after the stunning showing of the right wing, ultranationalist Vladimir Zhirinovsky and his Liberal Democratic Party in Sunday's parliamentary elections.
NEWS
August 25, 2008 | Charles Krauthammer
Charles Krauthammer writes for the Washington Post Read the first five paragraphs of the NATO statement on the Russian invasion of Georgia, and you will find not a hint of who invaded whom. The statement is almost comically evenhanded. "We deplore all loss of life," it declared, as if deploring a bus accident. And it "expressed its grave concern over the situation in Georgia. " Situation, mind you. It's not until paragraph six that NATO, a 26-nation alliance with 900 million people and nearly half of world GDP, unsheathes its mighty sword, boldly declaring, "Russian military action" - not aggression, not invasion, not even incursion, but "action" - to be "inconsistent with its peacekeeping role.
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NEWS
September 8, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
In 1949, George Orwell published Nineteen Eighty-Four , his famous portrait of a totalitarian regime whose "Ministry of Truth" spews rank propaganda called "Newspeak" that turns historical facts on their head. Newspeak has been alive and well these past weeks in Moscow, where President Vladimir Putin flatly denied any Russian presence in Ukraine, even as thousands of Russian troops and heavy weapons invaded that country. What's more disturbing is that NATO leaders meeting in Wales last week to discuss Ukraine refused to denounce Putin's aggression as an "invasion.
NEWS
July 21, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Vladimir Putin has become a global menace. There is an irrefutable link between the Russian leader's reckless policies on Ukraine and the downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17. This tragedy is the direct outgrowth of his decision to train and arm Ukrainian separatists with heavy weapons in an effort to destabilize Ukraine. It doesn't matter whether the triggerman thought he was targeting a Ukrainian military plane rather than a civilian airliner. More than 200 European civilians, along with dozens of Aussies, Asians, and North Americans, lie dead because of Putin's determination to force Ukraine to join a new Russian empire.
NEWS
June 6, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
On meeting Ukraine's president-elect, Petro Poroshenko, in Warsaw Wednesday, President Obama said the United States was "absolutely committed to standing behind the Ukrainian people . . . not just in the coming days . . . but in the coming years. " That commitment is important because Ukraine has become the symbol of whether Russia can get away with destabilizing its European neighbors. Poroshenko must not only reform a sinking economy but also combat armed pro-Russian militias that have grabbed chunks of eastern Ukraine.
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
DONETSK, Ukraine - Piles of tires, barbed wire, and edgy guards in fatigues surround the 11-story headquarters of the DPR, or Donetsk People's Republic - the Ukrainian separatists who want to join eastern Ukraine to Russia. The building was seized from the regional government in April, and Russian television blares from a huge screen placed in front of the entrance. Inside, a pathetic collection of elderly potbellied men with iron bars, and young hopped-up men with knives and guns wander 11 flights of filthy stairs (elevators are shut down)
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
It will take cool heads to deal with Vladimir Putin after he dismembers Ukraine. And that moment is coming soon. Even as President Obama welcomed the acting prime minister of Ukraine, Arseniy Yatsenyuk, to the White House, the Russian leader advanced toward annexation of Crimea. Putin continues to deny what the whole world sees - that Russian troops have invaded Crimea - while hinting that he might send forces into eastern Ukraine to "protect" ethnic Russians. It's time for Obama and European leaders to look beyond Crimea to how they can prevent Putin from making even more dangerous moves.
SPORTS
February 25, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
SOCHI - Vladimir Putin hoped these 2014 Winter Olympics would show the world that a bright, new, and modern Russia had emerged from a nation with a mysterious and often dark past. In case anyone missed the point, it was reemphasized spectacularly Sunday night during closing ceremonies rife with 21st-century technology and augmented with the same artistic sensibility with which Russia launched the Sochi Olympics 17 days ago. Laser-lit and with special effects worthy of Hollywood, the colorful and musically rich ceremonies at Fisht Olympic Stadium marked the official end of an Olympiad that not only informed the world but astounded it. Logistically, the Sochi Games were, to a remarkable extent for so vast an enterprise, trouble-free.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2011 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
As Phil Rosenthal sees it, why should he travel 6,000 miles to Moscow to be told he's not funny when he can hear that at home in Los Angeles, without the jet lag? Exporting Raymond , his droll documentary that opens the weeklong Philadelphia CineFest on Thursday night, travels to Russia with the creator of Everybody Loves Raymond . Rosenthal's mission impossible - so long as he is not a victim of K&R (as insurers call kidnap and ransom) - is to assist a television network in translating his beloved sitcom for the Russian market, where Raymond is rechristened Kostya.
NEWS
August 25, 2008 | Charles Krauthammer
Charles Krauthammer writes for the Washington Post Read the first five paragraphs of the NATO statement on the Russian invasion of Georgia, and you will find not a hint of who invaded whom. The statement is almost comically evenhanded. "We deplore all loss of life," it declared, as if deploring a bus accident. And it "expressed its grave concern over the situation in Georgia. " Situation, mind you. It's not until paragraph six that NATO, a 26-nation alliance with 900 million people and nearly half of world GDP, unsheathes its mighty sword, boldly declaring, "Russian military action" - not aggression, not invasion, not even incursion, but "action" - to be "inconsistent with its peacekeeping role.
SPORTS
December 1, 2004 | By Don Steinberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three native Russians on the Flyers' roster last season will play in a Russia vs. The World all-star game assembled by Igor Larionov, who is retiring from professional hockey after 27 years in the NHL and Russian leagues. Larionov is making the exhibition game, to be held in Moscow, his farewell celebration. Comcast has signed an exclusive deal to televise the game nationally on its many local sports and news channels. CN8 will carry the game in the Philadelphia region - Dec. 13 at 8 p.m. - and will produce the U.S. end of the broadcast, adding English graphics and announcers to the Russian TV feed.
NEWS
December 10, 2003 | By Trudy Rubin
In early 2000, I asked a question about Russian President Putin that still reverberates in Moscow. Especially now. "Who is Mr. Putin?" I queried four top Russian officials, who sat on a stage before 1,000 international businessmen at the Davos World Economic Forum. One after the other, each looked around nervously and refused to answer. Russian TV crews filmed the scene, which was rebroadcast for weeks. Over the years, "Who is Mr. Putin?" became a mantra repeated by those who sought to fathom the goals and values of this former KGB officer.
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