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NEWS
December 20, 2004 | By Mark McDonald INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
A man who saved America - and probably the world - is living out his days on a tiny pension in a dank apartment in a forlorn suburb of Moscow. He has a bad stomach, varicose veins, and a mangy, spotted dog named Jack the Ripper. Stanislav Petrov's life is small now. He walks Jack, makes tea from herbs he picks in the park, and harangues his 34-year-old son about getting off the computer and finding a girlfriend. There was a time when Petrov, now a 65-year-old widower, was almost larger than life, a privileged member of the Soviet Union's military elite, a lieutenant colonel on the fast track to a generalship.
NEWS
December 8, 2005 | By Warren P. Strobel INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice chided Russia yesterday over a Kremlin-backed proposal that could significantly limit the role of activist groups and nongovernmental organizations, particularly foreign ones. Rice, who has sought to avoid a public confrontation with President Vladimir V. Putin over the issue, said the United States had concerns about the legislation. "We would certainly hope that the importance of nongovernmental organizations to a stable, democratic environment would be understood by the Russian government," Rice said after a meeting here with Ukrainian President Viktor A. Yushchenko.
NEWS
July 26, 1995 | by Nels Nelson, Daily News Staff Writer
Walter Dallas, artistic director of Freedom Theater, returned this week from a wholly unexpected summer adventure in theater. He had spent 12 days at the annual National Playwrights Conference in Waterford, Conn. - also referred to by theater folk as "the O'Neill" - directing a cast of five Russian actresses in a script written entirely in the Russian language. "I know only six words in Russian," offered Dallas, "and two of them are 'vodka.' " The assignment broke suddenly on July 4 in a phone call from the conference artistic director, Lloyd Richards.
SPORTS
September 10, 1992 | by Mark Kram, Daily News Sports Writer
In an effort to shore up their defense, weakened with the defection of Mark Howe to the Detroit Red Wings and the trade of Steve Duchesne and Kerry Huffman to Quebec as part of the Eric Lindros package, the Flyers announced the signing of Russian defenseman Dimitri Yushkevich to a contract. In yesterday's press conference at a South Philadelphia restaurant to preview the opening of training camp in the small Canadian province of Prince Edward Island Saturday, general manager Russ Farwell said there is "still some small question over who owns his foreign rights.
NEWS
March 16, 1991 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
She strode confidently into a job fair for Russian emigres in Northeast Philadelphia two months ago, a Horatio Alger in a dark business suit. Yelena Razumouskaya had been a lawyer in Moscow, but was willing to start over in her new country as an office clerk. She would polish her English, learn American customs and slowly win more responsibility from her employer. The problem was no one would hire her as a clerk. This week, her rags-to-riches story skipped a few pages. She got a job as a lawyer.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1995 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The Mann Music Center opened Monday as festively as it could, given the rain and cool winds that all but swept the lawn-seating area clear and probably kept many concertgoers at home. The Philadelphia Orchestra began its 66th summer in Fairmount Park with Russian conductor Vassily Sinaisky on the podium to lead a program of Russian music in a Mann Center displaying new touches. The theater has undergone some painting and lighting improvements; seats have replaced benches outside the theater; and the food in the tent at the top of the hill has been upgraded for those who want to eat before the concert.
NEWS
April 1, 2012 | By Irina Titova, Associated Press
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia - For years, kopek-pinching Soviets sat down in a cheap restaurant in a former mansion of the nobility for plain meals, unaware of the treasure secreted nearby. Workers restoring the building last week finally found it, unexpectedly, in a storage space hidden between two floors - more than 1,000 pieces of jewelry, silver service sets stamped with the name of one of Russia's most prominent noble families, mirrors and brushes in silver frames. Many of them were wrapped in newspapers dated from the early months of 1917, as Russia careened toward the Bolshevik Revolution that ended life as the nobles had known it. Friday's announcement of the find by the Intarsia company, which is performing the restoration work, excited the news media and sparked arguments over who can claim the valuables.
SPORTS
July 1, 1994 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Sergei Kobazev had just become the first Russian fighter to win an American professional championship, an event of some historic significance. "This is glasnost," said Bob Lee, president of the International Boxing Federation. "Somebody call Boris Yeltsin. " Kobazev's capturing the United States Boxing Association cruiserweight title at Trump's Castle might not rate up there with the fall of communism in his homeland as a worldwide news story, but his absolute domination of Robert Daniels is bound to cause some ripples in a sport too often deeply divided by national partisanship.
NEWS
December 28, 1992 | by Francis Fukuyama, From the New York Times
The plight of the 25 million Russians outside of Russia has become a foreign-policy concern of President Boris Yeltsin's government. In this issue are the seeds of another crisis more dangerous than the breakup of Yugoslavia. Estonia has passed and Latvia has proposed discriminatory citizenship laws requiring Russians, as well as other ethnic minorities, to go through a difficult naturalization process during which they cannot vote, own property or hold certain jobs. These policies may be understandable for historical reasons, given Baltic fears of being overwhelmed by the Russians.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1992 | By Lesley Valdes, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC Dennis Romero, Nich Cristiano and Karl Stark also contributed
The bass tremolos in Shostakovich's Prelude No. 14 in E-flat minor seem made to order for Keith Jarrett, their cosmic rumble reminiscent of some of the popular pianist's earliest improvisations. Some of the Russian composer's most lulling phrases also bring out Jarrett's penchant for fluid, lyrical sonority. In fact, there are laps and laps of swimmingly pretty piano tones on Jarrett's recently released Shostakovich album, 24 Preludes and Fugues (Op. 87) (ECM New Series ECM 1469/70, 437 189-2 )
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