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NEWS
April 11, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The president of Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia was named the 20th president of Rutgers University at one of the most controversial times in the flagship state school's history. Robert L. Barchi, a Philadelphia native who has run the health sciences university since 2004 and was due to step down this summer, was approved by both the Board of Governors and Rutger's board of trustees at a special meeting Wednesday morning on the main campus in New Brunswick. Culminating a nine-month search process, Barchi will begin at the more than 58,000-student Rutgers system on Sept.
NEWS
April 19, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Francis L. Lawrence, 75, who served as president of Rutgers University from 1990 to 2002, died Tuesday, April 16, in his Mount Laurel home, the university said Wednesday. A cause of death was not disclosed. Dr. Lawrence oversaw a period of sweeping changes at the state's flagship public university, including the implementation of the school's first long-term strategic plan, "A New Vision for Excellence," and the establishment of more than 50 new undergraduate and graduate degree programs and more than 45 research centers and institutes, the school said.
NEWS
November 30, 2012 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rutgers University severed its ties to the sports apparel giant Adidas Group on Monday, responding to student concerns about the company's obligation to workers at a former Indonesian manufacturing plant. The company is no longer licensed to use the Rutgers name or logos, university spokesman E.J. Miranda said. After the campus bookstores' stock of Adidas gear is sold, it will not be reordered. Rutgers president Robert L. Barchi announced the decision in a letter to Rutgers United Students Against Sweatshops, which began an anti-Adidas campaign in August.
NEWS
July 12, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Rutgers University professor who has twice attempted to run for president of Iran says he is disappointed, but not angry or surprised, that the United States reportedly has monitored his e-mail. The online news outlet the Intercept reported Wednesday that e-mail addresses linked to Hooshang Amirahmadi, along with four other prominent Muslim Americans, appeared on a list of more than 7,000 monitored by the FBI and National Security Agency beginning between 2002 and 2008. It remains unclear whether monitoring continues.
SPORTS
March 1, 1996 | By John McBride, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The NJSIAA boys' and girls' individual swimming championships will begin tonight at Rutgers University with the boys' preliminaries at 6 p.m. The girls' preliminaries are set for tomorrow at 9:30 a.m. Finals for both are slated for 5:30 p.m. The boys' diving championships are scheduled for 5 p.m. Tuesday at Trenton State College, the girls' competition for Thursday at 5 p.m. 200 MEDLEY RELAY. Cherry Hill West's boys will be chasing Hunterdon Central and Mountain Lakes.
LIVING
March 27, 1996 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, FOR THE INQUIRER
Julius Lazarus knew what it felt like to be an outcast. He was a Jewish teenager in Austria in the '30s when Adolf Hitler came to power. His oldest brother was one of the first killed at the Nazi concentration camp in Dachau. So when he began a career as a photographer in New York, it was the unpopular causes and struggles that stirred his blood. He snapped images of Communist rallies to save Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, who later were executed for selling atomic secrets to the Soviets.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW BRUNSWICK - Tuition at Rutgers University will increase 2.2 percent for the "typical" undergraduate student this fall, the university's board of governors decided Wednesday. Base tuition in the university's most popular school - Arts and Sciences - will increase to $10,954 for the 2014-15 school year, up from $10,718. Mandatory fees will also rise. A full-time, in-state undergraduate in the School of Arts and Sciences in New Brunswick will pay $13,813 in tuition and fees next year; a similar student in Camden will pay $13,683.
NEWS
May 19, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Whatever the weather, graduation ceremonies at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, N.J., will mark Christopher Jones' final steps from the darkness into the sunlight. In 2011, Jones transferred to Rutgers after two years at Delaware Valley College in Bucks County, where he was the target of abuse for being gay. Simply for being himself, in other words. The harassment had begun in the fall of 2010, shortly after Rutgers freshman Tyler Clementi committed suicide days after a straight roommate outed him on the Internet.
NEWS
June 17, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a girl growing up in Galloway Township, just outside Atlantic City, Cierra Kaler-Jones was wowed by the beauty pageant queens who visited her elementary school after they won. "All the little girls dreamed of being Miss America - you look at the crown, and the sash, and the glamor and think it's the end-all deal," she said. But as the newly crowned Miss New Jersey, the Rutgers University student said she now understands the role is much more. "It's about working for your community . . . and being intelligent and a mentor to others," she said in an interview Sunday, a day after she captured the title at the Ocean City Music Pier.
NEWS
June 8, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Is it a critter making a South Jersey comeback or just Internet innuendo making the rounds? It's hard to say, but Pennsauken has posted on its website that the township has had "a handful of reports" that a creature known to some as a "fisher cat" had been sighted in the last few days. "While this animal's natural habitat is much farther north than Pennsauken, the Township is currently looking into this matter to confirm or deny this claim's validity," the website says, adding, "Any issues regarding animal control in Pennsauken Township should be directed to 856-663-3058.
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NEWS
July 18, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW BRUNSWICK - Tuition at Rutgers University will increase 2.2 percent for the "typical" undergraduate student this fall, the university's board of governors decided Wednesday. Base tuition in the university's most popular school - Arts and Sciences - will increase to $10,954 for the 2014-15 school year, up from $10,718. Mandatory fees will also rise. A full-time, in-state undergraduate in the School of Arts and Sciences in New Brunswick will pay $13,813 in tuition and fees next year; a similar student in Camden will pay $13,683.
NEWS
July 12, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Rutgers University professor who has twice attempted to run for president of Iran says he is disappointed, but not angry or surprised, that the United States reportedly has monitored his e-mail. The online news outlet the Intercept reported Wednesday that e-mail addresses linked to Hooshang Amirahmadi, along with four other prominent Muslim Americans, appeared on a list of more than 7,000 monitored by the FBI and National Security Agency beginning between 2002 and 2008. It remains unclear whether monitoring continues.
NEWS
June 23, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman and Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writers
Locked in a struggle to reshape Rutgers University, New Jersey Senate President Stephen Sweeney last week declared a de facto three-month cease-fire even as he seemed to issue an ultimatum. Sweeney on Thursday gave the university's two governing boards - of trustees and governors - 90 days to act on recommendations laid out in an internal Rutgers report. Failure to do so, he said, would prompt the Assembly to move forward with legislation, already passed by the Senate, that would increase the number of politically appointed members on the board of governors.
NEWS
June 21, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman and Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writers
TRENTON - State Senate President Stephen Sweeney said Thursday that he would give Rutgers University 90 days to change its governance structure, based on an internal university report, or he would move forward with controversial legislation to expand its governing board. If the board of governors and board of trustees do not act, Sweeney (D., Gloucester) said, he would deliver the legislation to the Assembly. "The proposition is simple: Rutgers has a chance to reform itself or the state will reform Rutgers," Sweeney said in a statement about an hour after the Senate passed the bill on a 22-13 vote.
NEWS
June 17, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a girl growing up in Galloway Township, just outside Atlantic City, Cierra Kaler-Jones was wowed by the beauty pageant queens who visited her elementary school after they won. "All the little girls dreamed of being Miss America - you look at the crown, and the sash, and the glamor and think it's the end-all deal," she said. But as the newly crowned Miss New Jersey, the Rutgers University student said she now understands the role is much more. "It's about working for your community . . . and being intelligent and a mentor to others," she said in an interview Sunday, a day after she captured the title at the Ocean City Music Pier.
NEWS
June 14, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman and Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writers
TRENTON - New Jersey lawmakers voted Thursday to amend Senate President Stephen Sweeney's proposal to expand Rutgers University's board of governors, a day after the Legislature's counsel warned that it might not withstand a court challenge. The board's chairman, Gerald C. Harvey, said that he initially viewed the amendments "as proactive" but that they continue to address a nonexistent problem. In the latest twist in Sweeney's continuing battle to reshape Rutgers' leadership, the senator told reporters that it was Harvey who recommended the changes.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN THE MAN from Philadelphia arrived in Las Vegas, the city was starting to wake up. Casinos were being built, but the Mafia had too much influence, and Bugsy Siegel had just been slain. Nevertheless, the period of the early 1950s was called the "Golden Era" because the potential was not just a glint in the eyes of a few rich men. It was real. Alvin "Al" Benedict, a Central High School grad and Rutgers swimming champ, arrived in town and eventually became a casino executive who helped some of those rich men get richer.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
A memo issued Wednesday questions the legality of a bill that New Jersey's Senate president has introduced to expand the number of political appointees to Rutgers University's main governing board. The bill "may be held to be an impairment of the 1956 legislative contract between Rutgers and the state, implicating the contract clause of the constitution," reads the memo, which lawmakers requested from the Office of Legislative Services. Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester)
NEWS
June 12, 2014
A story Sunday about the role of the Teamsters union at the Convention Center misidentified a union leader who was known to work well with others at the center. He was Michael Conway. A story Wednesday on the Cheltenham Township School District budget gave an imprecise figure. For the 2014-15 academic year, the overall budget will increase 4.23 percent, and the school tax rate will increase 3.26 percent. A column Tuesday on historical markers in Haddon Heights misstated when a marker was reported missing.
NEWS
June 12, 2014 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
You remember that adage, Those who can, do. Those who can't, attempt to control education. Education is already a political hot mess before elected officials become involved. New Jersey Senate President and Gloucester County Democrat Stephen Sweeney's epic, ongoing battle over Rutgers University's governance makes Philadelphia City Council's issues with the public schools look like finger painting. Chartered a decade before independence as Queen's College, Rutgers evolved into the state university, with a 1956 act installing a powerful board of governors in addition to the historic board of trustees, which helped maintain the school's independence and limited political interference.
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