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Rutgers University

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NEWS
April 11, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The president of Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia was named the 20th president of Rutgers University at one of the most controversial times in the flagship state school's history. Robert L. Barchi, a Philadelphia native who has run the health sciences university since 2004 and was due to step down this summer, was approved by both the Board of Governors and Rutger's board of trustees at a special meeting Wednesday morning on the main campus in New Brunswick. Culminating a nine-month search process, Barchi will begin at the more than 58,000-student Rutgers system on Sept.
NEWS
April 19, 2013 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Francis L. Lawrence, 75, who served as president of Rutgers University from 1990 to 2002, died Tuesday, April 16, in his Mount Laurel home, the university said Wednesday. A cause of death was not disclosed. Dr. Lawrence oversaw a period of sweeping changes at the state's flagship public university, including the implementation of the school's first long-term strategic plan, "A New Vision for Excellence," and the establishment of more than 50 new undergraduate and graduate degree programs and more than 45 research centers and institutes, the school said.
NEWS
April 9, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
NOW HERE'S the kind of husband every woman should cherish. Carlis F. Cook Jr. would prepare gourmet meals just for his wife, Aqila - breakfast, lunch and dinner. Imagine breakfast in bed served by a doting husband! Eat your hearts out, ladies! But Carlis loved to cook, and who better to express his talents upon than a receptive family? Carlis Cook, an optician and longtime maintenance supervisor for Rutgers University, Air Force veteran of the Korean War, and loving family man, died last Wednesday.
NEWS
November 30, 2012 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rutgers University severed its ties to the sports apparel giant Adidas Group on Monday, responding to student concerns about the company's obligation to workers at a former Indonesian manufacturing plant. The company is no longer licensed to use the Rutgers name or logos, university spokesman E.J. Miranda said. After the campus bookstores' stock of Adidas gear is sold, it will not be reordered. Rutgers president Robert L. Barchi announced the decision in a letter to Rutgers United Students Against Sweatshops, which began an anti-Adidas campaign in August.
SPORTS
March 1, 1996 | By John McBride, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The NJSIAA boys' and girls' individual swimming championships will begin tonight at Rutgers University with the boys' preliminaries at 6 p.m. The girls' preliminaries are set for tomorrow at 9:30 a.m. Finals for both are slated for 5:30 p.m. The boys' diving championships are scheduled for 5 p.m. Tuesday at Trenton State College, the girls' competition for Thursday at 5 p.m. 200 MEDLEY RELAY. Cherry Hill West's boys will be chasing Hunterdon Central and Mountain Lakes.
LIVING
March 27, 1996 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, FOR THE INQUIRER
Julius Lazarus knew what it felt like to be an outcast. He was a Jewish teenager in Austria in the '30s when Adolf Hitler came to power. His oldest brother was one of the first killed at the Nazi concentration camp in Dachau. So when he began a career as a photographer in New York, it was the unpopular causes and struggles that stirred his blood. He snapped images of Communist rallies to save Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, who later were executed for selling atomic secrets to the Soviets.
NEWS
May 19, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
A car door slammed on South Reeds Beach Road, and 300 feeding shorebirds - ruddy turnstones, sandpipers, and red knots - took wing, shrieking out over the Delaware Bay. The commotion caught the attention of Rutgers University biologist Joanna Burger. She rose from the nearby bulkhead where she was monitoring an experiment, and started walking over. All seemed calm on this Middle Township beach in Cape May County. And yet there is growing tension here between economics and ecology, conservationist and oyster farmer.
NEWS
February 26, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
Nothing says New Jersey like a plump homegrown tomato. Researchers at Rutgers University say they have perfected an improved and juicier version, not found in supermarkets, that will delight discerning taste buds of tomato lovers. Home gardeners have a chance this spring to grow a new version of the famous, classic "Rutgers" variety, which became synonymous with the Jersey tomato for decades after it was released to the public in 1934. The Rutgers New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station (NJAES)
NEWS
June 8, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Is it a critter making a South Jersey comeback or just Internet innuendo making the rounds? It's hard to say, but Pennsauken has posted on its website that the township has had "a handful of reports" that a creature known to some as a "fisher cat" had been sighted in the last few days. "While this animal's natural habitat is much farther north than Pennsauken, the Township is currently looking into this matter to confirm or deny this claim's validity," the website says, adding, "Any issues regarding animal control in Pennsauken Township should be directed to 856-663-3058.
NEWS
July 27, 2013
A story Wednesday contained incorrect figures supplied by Rutgers University for its new Biomedical and Health Sciences division. The correct numbers for the division are 2,689 faculty, 8,628 staff, and nearly 8,000 students.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 20, 2016
ISSUE | CAMPAIGN 2016 Let's get civil President Obama gave an inspirational speech Sunday at Rutgers University's commencement, addressing the dangers of ignorance and anti-intellectualism ("Get smart," Monday). This is one of the scary characteristics of many of the followers of presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump. It's based on anger and xenophobia. This elicits further division and has the potential to encourage violence. We have created terrorism within ourselves as our demographics have changed.
NEWS
May 19, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
A car door slammed on South Reeds Beach Road, and 300 feeding shorebirds - ruddy turnstones, sandpipers, and red knots - took wing, shrieking out over the Delaware Bay. The commotion caught the attention of Rutgers University biologist Joanna Burger. She rose from the nearby bulkhead where she was monitoring an experiment, and started walking over. All seemed calm on this Middle Township beach in Cape May County. And yet there is growing tension here between economics and ecology, conservationist and oyster farmer.
NEWS
May 17, 2016 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, POLITICS WRITER
PISCATAWAY, N.J. - Speaking at the Rutgers University commencement Sunday, President Obama condemned what he said was a disturbing anti-intellectual strain in contemporary politics and delivered a thinly disguised takedown of presumed Republican nominee Donald Trump. "In politics and in life, ignorance is not a virtue," Obama told more than 50,000 people in Highpoint Solutions Stadium, home to the school's football program. "It's not cool to not know what you're talking about.
NEWS
May 2, 2016
Two New Jersey universities pay their commencement speakers sums much higher than their peers across the region, according to an Inquirer survey. Rutgers University is paying $35,000 to veteran journalist Bill Moyers for speaking at its New Brunswick commencement ceremony May 15. (President Obama, who will be the featured speaker, did not accept the invitation until after Moyers had been announced. He will not be paid.) Kean University's undergraduate and graduate commencement speakers will both be paid $40,000.
NEWS
May 1, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
Rutgers University's New Brunswick commencement ceremony next month - with President Obama as speaker - will be ticketed for crowd control, which is riling some college seniors who say they now have to decide whom to invite. Each of the 12,000 graduating Rutgers-New Brunswick students is being offered three guest tickets for the May 15 event at High Point Solutions Stadium in Piscataway. Rutgers-Camden and Rutgers-Newark students also are being invited to attend the ceremony as guests, which has made some New Brunswick students angry.
NEWS
April 16, 2016 | By Jonathan Lai, Staff Writer
President Obama will be the featured speaker at Rutgers University's commencement ceremony on the New Brunswick campus next month as the university celebrates its 250th anniversary. The university and the White House announced Obama's acceptance Thursday. The Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colo., and Howard University in Washington also said the president would speak at their graduation ceremonies. They will be the final three commencement speeches Obama delivers as president.
NEWS
April 10, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
University scholars who work under threat in countries that suppress academic freedom will be offered "safe haven" through a new endowment established in honor of Beau Biden, late son of the vice president. The $1 million gift, from an anonymous donor, will pay for one scholar each year to move to an American university and work free from danger. The Institute of International Education announced the gift Friday afternoon at a news conference at the University of Delaware's campus in Wilmington.
NEWS
February 26, 2016 | By Melanie Burney, Staff Writer
Nothing says New Jersey like a plump homegrown tomato. Researchers at Rutgers University say they have perfected an improved and juicier version, not found in supermarkets, that will delight discerning taste buds of tomato lovers. Home gardeners have a chance this spring to grow a new version of the famous, classic "Rutgers" variety, which became synonymous with the Jersey tomato for decades after it was released to the public in 1934. The Rutgers New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station (NJAES)
NEWS
February 25, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
Tide gauges show that average sea levels have been steadily rising since the late 1800s, a worrisome trend that scientists blame on emissions of heat-trapping greenhouse gases. But what about the centuries before then, when those gauges were mostly nonexistent? Part of the answer, a team of researchers reported this week, lies in the salt marshes of South Jersey. In a study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, authors calculated sea levels over thousands of years by analyzing cores of sediment from the salt marshes and 23 other geological sites around the world.
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