IN THE NEWS

Rye

FEATURED ARTICLES
FOOD
November 12, 2000 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
What is corned beef without good rye? A singer without a stage. A yin without yang. Deli meat without a ride. So where can you find the best authentic bread for your sandwich? Philadelphia still has several good old-fashioned rye bakeries, whose breads we sampled. According to local preference, they tended to be thin-crust and soft, but of largely comparable quality. Moish's Addison Bakery. 10865 Bustleton Ave., Philadelphia; 215-464-8055. The lightest crumb of the group, with a soft pliant texture that works best in sandwiches that aren't too wet with dressing.
FOOD
June 8, 1986 | By Andrew Schloss, Special to The Inquirer
Give anyone in this country over the age of 3 a couple of slices of bread, and the kid'll probably know what to do with them. Slap them with peanut butter, pastrami or jam. Stack them with turkey breast, cheddar and ham. Toast them. Grill them. Batter them and fry them. Roll them around a sausage, a hot dog or a steak. Drown them with gravy over meat loaf or beef. There is no food in our culture as easy to prepare and none more soulful than an honest sandwich. In the last decade, the increased availability of alternative breads, from croissant to pita, has changed the look and construction of the typical American sandwich, but most of its rules remain the same.
NEWS
November 1, 2013
What to eat: Get your deli on at the "best meat on the street" truck. Hot corned beef, pastrami and brisket, grilled chicken, roast beef, turkey, tuna, Reubens, salads, matzo ball soup, knishes, kosher dogs, latkes. We could go on, but we're getting hungry. Suffice it to say, the menu is huge, as long as you're not on a low-carb diet. Details: In a city full of food trucks serving tacos and desserts - and, trust us, we have nothing against tacos and desserts, particularly in that order - Reuben on Rye is a nice change of pace.
NEWS
February 9, 1988 | By ROBERT STRAUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
It's Dec. 8, 1980, and John Lennon, the man who said he didn't want to be a 40-year-old Beatle, is a 40-year-old martyr. When police arrive at the scene outside Lennon's Manhattan apartment building , they find Lennon's assassin, Mark David Chapman, still hanging around. Tonight's PBS "Frontline" segment, "The Man Who Shot John Lennon" (10 p.m. on Channel 12), makes a grand attempt at discovering why the 25-year-old Chapman murdered the world's most famous rock star. Yet the result seems to glorify Chapman's mission to eliminate "phoniness" more than it castigates him for the crime.
NEWS
August 21, 1991 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
What's the difference between a person who eats a ham sandwich in a luncheonette and a person who gets a ham sandwich to go? One is a member of a class-action suit, the other is not. It all began in October 1989 with what was billed as the largest fine for meat-adulteration in the history of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Sandy Mac Inc. of Pennsauken admitted pumping water into hams from 1975 to 1987 and bribing federal meat inspectors to look the other way. The company agreed to pay a $1 million fine.
NEWS
July 26, 2001 | By Joann Klimkiewicz INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When three rowdy boys, ages 12 and 13 and charged with disorderly conduct, ended up before District Justice Deborah Truscello-McHugh about a year ago, she knew that merely slapping them with fines wouldn't do. She needed something that would rattle them awake, something that would keep them off the streets and out of her courtroom - something like a book club. Now a youngster found guilty of such a minor offense as disorderly conduct or underage drinking may be given three months to read a book assigned by the judge and write a five-page report.
NEWS
March 13, 1993 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / AKIRA SUWA
The ingenuity of 600 young scientists shone yesterday at the 15th annual George Washington Carver Science Fair at Temple University. The fair, named for the botanist and chemist, drew students from high schools areawide. Among them was Romana Antoniow, 17, who explained her project, "The Effects of Hydrocarbons on the Growth of Pasture of Rye," to judges James McGonigle and Kristine Matzko.
NEWS
December 16, 2012
'We're the distillery of unseen things," says Meredith Grelli. And she isn't kidding. First came the "Monongahela rye" that Wigle, her family's new craft distillery in Pittsburgh, debuted earlier this year to reclaim Pennsylvania's colonial heritage as a rye center (with Dad's Hat in Bristol also joining the push). Now comes Wigle's Ginever, a take on the proto-gin popularized by the 18th-century Dutch that, in contrast to the crisper English style made with neutral spirits, uses fuller-bodied grain whiskey as its base.
FOOD
May 3, 1989 | By Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: I recently purchased a blue suede jacket. Is there a good way to clean it at home? A professional cleaner said he would charge about $50. - Gweneth Dear Gweneth: I really can't recommend home cleaning for suede. To remove daily dust and keep it looking good, you can gently brush the jacket with a very soft brush; however, major cleaning must be done by a professional. The only thing I can suggest is to shop around to try to find a cleaner who can give you a better price.
FOOD
May 2, 2001 | by Rachel Rogala For the Daily News
One of the elements that makes a traditional Reuben sandwich taste so good is the rye bread. However, at Hymie's Merion Deli at 342 Montgomery Ave., Merion, the "Reuben Latke" switches rye for another ingredient - potato pancakes (latkes). It's an open-faced sandwich that incorporates the usual Reuben flavors - sauerkraut, corned beef, Swiss cheese, Russian dressing. But the potato latkes give it a fun twist. Owner Louis Barson (who practically grew up in the business since his family bought the original deli from Hymie in 1974)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 26, 2015
In beer, as in whiskey, rye is on the rise. But the best versions, as with most trends centered on big personalities, capture that boisterous character in a delicate balance. In the case of rye's signature kick, too many I've tasted let the grain's edgy spice overwhelm. The new Rye IPA seasonal offering from Yards Brewing, however, is a nice exception. The amber brew has a vivid freshness from whole-flower clusters of herbal Chinook hops, followed by Centennial, Citra, Simco and Columbus hops that bring a citrusy, piney brightness to the IPA's bitterness.
FOOD
August 1, 2014 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
When Robert Cassell first popped onto the spirit scene in 2006 as the master behind Bluecoat gin and Philadelphia Distilling, his company was a pioneer in a Pennsylvania craft distilling movement, that, at the time, numbered just one. Eight years later, after a split with his founding partners, Cassell, 35, is starting anew in a big way, launching an innovative line of stills, chairing the newly formed Pennsylvania Distillers Guild, and firing up...
FOOD
January 24, 2014 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Whenever I get the chance to travel to Northern California, there is always great wine. But San Francisco and the nearby wine country, of course, also serve up some of America's best dining - typically the kind setting trends that Philadelphians might see in a year (or two). That gap may be closing, though, based on some of the highlights from my brief eating stops in San Francisco on the way to Sonoma. The fermentation craze (kimchi-pickled everything), local ingredients, craft cocktails, artisanal coffee, and small plates we have.
NEWS
November 1, 2013
What to eat: Get your deli on at the "best meat on the street" truck. Hot corned beef, pastrami and brisket, grilled chicken, roast beef, turkey, tuna, Reubens, salads, matzo ball soup, knishes, kosher dogs, latkes. We could go on, but we're getting hungry. Suffice it to say, the menu is huge, as long as you're not on a low-carb diet. Details: In a city full of food trucks serving tacos and desserts - and, trust us, we have nothing against tacos and desserts, particularly in that order - Reuben on Rye is a nice change of pace.
NEWS
February 18, 2013
We're living in the age of barrel-aged improvement, as everything from beer to Manischewitz is getting a moment inside charred oak to pick up extra tannins and woody caramels. Even City Hall is doing barrel time these days - the cocktail, that is. "City Hall" is what Pub & Kitchen bar master George Costa calls the combination of Rittenhouse rye, Laird's apple brandy, Bual Madeira, Cynar, and Ramazzotti Amaro he concocted for a Philly-themed drink competition a few years ago. For some reason, it didn't win. What it obviously needed was a date with a barrel.
NEWS
December 16, 2012
'We're the distillery of unseen things," says Meredith Grelli. And she isn't kidding. First came the "Monongahela rye" that Wigle, her family's new craft distillery in Pittsburgh, debuted earlier this year to reclaim Pennsylvania's colonial heritage as a rye center (with Dad's Hat in Bristol also joining the push). Now comes Wigle's Ginever, a take on the proto-gin popularized by the 18th-century Dutch that, in contrast to the crisper English style made with neutral spirits, uses fuller-bodied grain whiskey as its base.
NEWS
July 16, 2012 | Craig LaBan
There is serious Pennsylvania pride in play as new craft distillers suddenly bid to reclaim the state's historical place as America's rye whiskey mecca. But there is also family history in Dad's Hat Rye, a whiskey meant to evoke the taste of Herman Mihalich's grandfather favorite drink — and a staple in the family's tavern in Monessen, Pa., where Mihalich lived as a child upstairs. The year-old Mountain Laurel Spirits distillery he's created with old college chum and partner, John Cooper, is state of the art, despite the historic setting in a rehabbed woolen mill in downtown Bristol, which opens to the public this weekend for Saturday tours, tastings, and sales.
NEWS
May 14, 2012 | Craig LaBan
Philip Wigle (a.k.a. Vigol) was one of the first heroes of Pennsylvania's storied "Monongahela rye," a convicted instigator in the Whiskey Rebellion sentenced to hang, then pardoned by a reluctant George Washington. It's only fitting that one of the new distilleries now reviving Pennsylvania's rightful place as a rye capital should be named in his honor. Wigle Whiskey, opened just two months ago with a visitor-friendly distillery in Pittsburgh's Strip District, is a family affair — retired lawyer Mark Meyer running the still with son Eric, daughter Meredith Grelli doing marketing, and mother Mary Ellen Meyer spiking the marshmallow treats with booze for her signature "Wigle Krispies.
NEWS
November 10, 2011
WELCOME TO Cheap Buzz, where we eavesdrop as sommelier Marnie Old attempts to teach the joys of wine and fine spirits to Buzz, a guy with no sophistication and not much money. Here's their latest conversation: BUZZ: When I was a kid and the weather turned chilly, my grandma drank rye Manhattans. She'd let me have the cherry. MARNIE: Brown spirits like whiskey are great for shaking a winter chill. Not only does the alcohol feel warm going down, the oak aging adds toasty flavors reminiscent of caramel, vanilla and brown baking spices.
NEWS
June 12, 2011
While the eating may be suspect at the Farmers' Cabinet, the libations are solid gold. The beer geeks will be in heaven with 26 stellar taps of unusual Euro suds, including cask renditions of rare salty, wheaty Swiss La Douze from BFM, among many others. But with a ragtime band pumping away, I was really channeling the pre-Prohibition cocktail inspirations from mix-mistress Phoebe Esmon. There are renditions of the classics (a tart whiskey sour amped up with egg whites and Yamazaki whisky)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|