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Rye Bread

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2001 | by Kent Steinriede For the Daily News
Germany, probably more than any other country on the planet, is hellbent on quality. This ranges from cars to cutlery to even the spartan yet satisfying sandwiches served at both breakfast and lunch. Take heavy, dark rye bread, some cold cuts and maybe a slice of cheese or a dab of mustard, and you've got the classic German sandwich. Don't even think about mayonnaise or butter, says Walter Rieker, co-owner of Rieker's Prime Meats, 7979 Oxford Ave. (215-745-3114) in Fox Chase, where nearly all the meat cold cuts and sausages are made and smoked on the premises.
FOOD
April 2, 1995 | By Mary Carroll, FOR THE INQUIRER
Pates are savory combinations of ingredients packed into a loaf pan and baked slowly or pureed and refrigerated, then served sliced or spread onto crackers. They are the busy host's dream appetizer, since they can be made ahead. Plus, not much can go wrong with a pate. Pates made from vegetables and grains are considerably lower in fat and salt than those made with meat. But to get the rich flavor that pates deserve, you must saute the vegetables, herbs and other ingredients before baking or chilling the pate.
FOOD
November 18, 1987 | By BARBARA GIBBONS, Special to the Daily News
Every turkey fan has his own favorite first sandwich after Thanksgiving; its creation is a tradition that must not vary. For some it's a pair of size- 10 slabs of rye bread slathered with mayonnaise and layered with white meat. For others it's a mini-buffet, a replication of the Thanksgiving dinner table between two slices of bread - turkey, dressing and cranberry sauce, a colorful mess! When I was 14 years old (and over 200 pounds), I lost just such a sandwich somewhere in Woolworth's on my way to my after-school job. I never did get it back, even though I went to Woolworth's Lost and Found to claim it. The people behind the counter tried hard not to laugh at a little fat kid in tears over a sandwich.
FOOD
February 3, 1988 | By JEANMARIE BROWNSON, Special to the Daily News
It is no coincidence that one of the world's oldest spices is found commonly in many dishes. Caraway flavors rye bread, cheeses, cabbage dishes such as sauerkraut, as well as a host of cooked dishes and desserts. Almost everything from fish to poultry and meats is complemented by caraway's unique flavor. In addition to savory dishes, caraway can be used in yeast breads, quick breads and sweet desserts. Native to Europe and the Middle East, caraway is popular in the cooking of Germany, Hungary, Austria and Scandinavia.
NEWS
May 1, 1987 | By SAM GUGINO, Daily News Restaurant Critic
I've never been to the Catskills, but the convivial communal dining hall atmosphere of Hesch's on a Saturday night is just how I envisioned Grossinger's. Owner Harry Katz (Hesch is Yiddish for Harry), having developed a dubious reputation as a kind of Harold Stassen of Philadelphia entrepreneurship, now seems to have a winner on the site of the old Frankie Bradley's. Katz clearly revels in his new found success, dapper as always, schmoozing with the clientele like a Jewish version of Casablanca Rick while offering samples of food as if the prodigious portions at Hesch's weren't already enough to send your body into hibernation.
NEWS
December 24, 2006 | By Julie Stoiber INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some years back, he can't say just how many, Larry Kozak of Drexel Hill decided to check out a little shop on Salmon Street that he had heard made some of the tastiest smoked sausage around. Two hours he waited in line, an unwitting participant in a decades-old holiday ritual in Port Richmond, where regulars camp out like concert fans for kielbasa that is stuffed and smoked right there in the rowhouse neighborhood. Now Kozak has his own tradition: getting there early. Which was how he came to be at Swiacki's Meats two Thursdays before Christmas, picking up provisions for his extended family: two babka cakes, four jars of Polish mustard, 28 dozen pierogi, and 30 pounds of the fat, garlicky links that are a mainstay of the Polish table at Easter and Christmas.
FOOD
March 1, 1998 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Virgil Thomson loved his "Missouri meatloaf. " Rossini relished his tournedos. The composer and gourmet devised a salad dressing of truffles, and even invented a way of stuffing macaroni with foie gras using a silver syringe. And what about George Gershwin? It's a question that got Fritz Blank thinking, this being the centennial year of the composer's birth. The chef-owner of Deux Cheminees answered in gastronomic form several Sunday nights ago with a dinner for a hundred guests that re-created a meal Blank figures Gershwin might have thought 'swonderful.
BUSINESS
March 23, 1992 | By Susan Q. Stranahan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A move by Stroehmann Bakeries to streamline production will create about a dozen jobs at the company's large Norristown facility and about 80 at its bakery near Hazleton. At the same time, Stroehmann, based in Horsham, has announced plans to close its bakery in Queens, N.Y., which employs about 500 people. The company also is closing one of two bakeries in Williamsport, which until last fall employed 155 people. Stroehmann's employs 4,300 people and ranks as one of the largest bakeries in the Northeast.
FOOD
November 2, 2012 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
When I tell people I make bread, they inevitably ask if I use a bread machine. That's like asking if I buy my pie crust in the freezer aisle. No. Never. For me, home-baked bread is more than a recipe. The process ties me to my Swedish great-grandmother, to my ancestors. The first bread my mother taught me to bake was Swedish rye, a bread that she serves on Christmas Eve as part of a traditional meal handed down from her Swedish grandmother. Filled with molasses, shredded carrots, orange zest, and bran, this rye bread is sweet and filling and tastes even better with a good slathering of butter.
FOOD
April 13, 1994 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
Cherries in Michigan, grapes in California, potatoes in Idaho . . . Pleasing to the eye, tasty to the palate, this was a map you could sink your teeth into. The map, made of rye bread, earned Mary Ellen Hatch a spot on the U.S.A. Bread Baking Team, which competed last month in an international bread-baking competition. Hatch, head baker at Breadsmith in Chestnut Hill, made the three-member team in the artistic category. That's where you start with a blob or two of dough and wind up with something arty.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
November 2, 2012 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
When I tell people I make bread, they inevitably ask if I use a bread machine. That's like asking if I buy my pie crust in the freezer aisle. No. Never. For me, home-baked bread is more than a recipe. The process ties me to my Swedish great-grandmother, to my ancestors. The first bread my mother taught me to bake was Swedish rye, a bread that she serves on Christmas Eve as part of a traditional meal handed down from her Swedish grandmother. Filled with molasses, shredded carrots, orange zest, and bran, this rye bread is sweet and filling and tastes even better with a good slathering of butter.
NEWS
December 24, 2006 | By Julie Stoiber INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Some years back, he can't say just how many, Larry Kozak of Drexel Hill decided to check out a little shop on Salmon Street that he had heard made some of the tastiest smoked sausage around. Two hours he waited in line, an unwitting participant in a decades-old holiday ritual in Port Richmond, where regulars camp out like concert fans for kielbasa that is stuffed and smoked right there in the rowhouse neighborhood. Now Kozak has his own tradition: getting there early. Which was how he came to be at Swiacki's Meats two Thursdays before Christmas, picking up provisions for his extended family: two babka cakes, four jars of Polish mustard, 28 dozen pierogi, and 30 pounds of the fat, garlicky links that are a mainstay of the Polish table at Easter and Christmas.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2001 | by Kent Steinriede For the Daily News
Germany, probably more than any other country on the planet, is hellbent on quality. This ranges from cars to cutlery to even the spartan yet satisfying sandwiches served at both breakfast and lunch. Take heavy, dark rye bread, some cold cuts and maybe a slice of cheese or a dab of mustard, and you've got the classic German sandwich. Don't even think about mayonnaise or butter, says Walter Rieker, co-owner of Rieker's Prime Meats, 7979 Oxford Ave. (215-745-3114) in Fox Chase, where nearly all the meat cold cuts and sausages are made and smoked on the premises.
FOOD
March 1, 1998 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Virgil Thomson loved his "Missouri meatloaf. " Rossini relished his tournedos. The composer and gourmet devised a salad dressing of truffles, and even invented a way of stuffing macaroni with foie gras using a silver syringe. And what about George Gershwin? It's a question that got Fritz Blank thinking, this being the centennial year of the composer's birth. The chef-owner of Deux Cheminees answered in gastronomic form several Sunday nights ago with a dinner for a hundred guests that re-created a meal Blank figures Gershwin might have thought 'swonderful.
FOOD
April 2, 1995 | By Mary Carroll, FOR THE INQUIRER
Pates are savory combinations of ingredients packed into a loaf pan and baked slowly or pureed and refrigerated, then served sliced or spread onto crackers. They are the busy host's dream appetizer, since they can be made ahead. Plus, not much can go wrong with a pate. Pates made from vegetables and grains are considerably lower in fat and salt than those made with meat. But to get the rich flavor that pates deserve, you must saute the vegetables, herbs and other ingredients before baking or chilling the pate.
FOOD
April 13, 1994 | by Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
Cherries in Michigan, grapes in California, potatoes in Idaho . . . Pleasing to the eye, tasty to the palate, this was a map you could sink your teeth into. The map, made of rye bread, earned Mary Ellen Hatch a spot on the U.S.A. Bread Baking Team, which competed last month in an international bread-baking competition. Hatch, head baker at Breadsmith in Chestnut Hill, made the three-member team in the artistic category. That's where you start with a blob or two of dough and wind up with something arty.
FOOD
August 22, 1993 | By Bev Bennett, FOR THE INQUIRER
During the summer, I turn the refrigerator into a personal deli. After loading up on smoked chicken, roasted red peppers, oil-packed dried tomatoes, cheeses, three kinds of mustards, four kinds of bread (to be stored in the freezer), and as many olives as the grocery store has, I'm ready for a month of lazy Saturday lunches. Rather than cook, my spouse and I rummage through the refrigerator, seeing what heady concoctions we can assemble. For the first week, this was hedonism, and our sandwiches resembled the total weekly diet of some teens.
BUSINESS
March 23, 1992 | By Susan Q. Stranahan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A move by Stroehmann Bakeries to streamline production will create about a dozen jobs at the company's large Norristown facility and about 80 at its bakery near Hazleton. At the same time, Stroehmann, based in Horsham, has announced plans to close its bakery in Queens, N.Y., which employs about 500 people. The company also is closing one of two bakeries in Williamsport, which until last fall employed 155 people. Stroehmann's employs 4,300 people and ranks as one of the largest bakeries in the Northeast.
FOOD
February 3, 1988 | By JEANMARIE BROWNSON, Special to the Daily News
It is no coincidence that one of the world's oldest spices is found commonly in many dishes. Caraway flavors rye bread, cheeses, cabbage dishes such as sauerkraut, as well as a host of cooked dishes and desserts. Almost everything from fish to poultry and meats is complemented by caraway's unique flavor. In addition to savory dishes, caraway can be used in yeast breads, quick breads and sweet desserts. Native to Europe and the Middle East, caraway is popular in the cooking of Germany, Hungary, Austria and Scandinavia.
FOOD
November 18, 1987 | By BARBARA GIBBONS, Special to the Daily News
Every turkey fan has his own favorite first sandwich after Thanksgiving; its creation is a tradition that must not vary. For some it's a pair of size- 10 slabs of rye bread slathered with mayonnaise and layered with white meat. For others it's a mini-buffet, a replication of the Thanksgiving dinner table between two slices of bread - turkey, dressing and cranberry sauce, a colorful mess! When I was 14 years old (and over 200 pounds), I lost just such a sandwich somewhere in Woolworth's on my way to my after-school job. I never did get it back, even though I went to Woolworth's Lost and Found to claim it. The people behind the counter tried hard not to laugh at a little fat kid in tears over a sandwich.
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