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Sabbath

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NEWS
January 3, 1995 | By ROLAND MERULLO
The Soviet writer Isaac Babel opened his magnificent short story, "Gedali," with these words: "On Sabbath eves I am oppressed by a dense melancholy of memories. " The sentence captivates me, because on Sabbath eves I am oppressed by my own dense melancholy, a melancholy trimmed with memories of great peace and joy. My father's parents, Italian immigrants, bore eight children and raised them in Revere, Mass., near Boston. In those days, Revere - though only four miles from the center of the metropolis - was a mixture of gently rolling farmland, and neighborhoods of crowded houses with small yards.
NEWS
February 11, 2003
THERE WAS a time in Philadelphia when "blue laws" prohibited selling anything on Sunday. Apparently, the idea was to remember the Sabbath and keep it holy. Didn't matter that some of us worship in places where they remember the Sabbath on Saturday or Friday - and keep that holy. Or that some folks are offended by keeping anything holy. The blue laws fell under the weight of these arguments, ushering in a new age when we were free to buy our buttons and bows on Sunday. When the wrath of God didn't come down on us, it just figured that someone would take it to the next step: Sunday sales of retail liquor.
NEWS
October 11, 1989 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Under ancient Torah law, Orthodox Jews are forbidden to carry anything - even a small child or a stroller - outside their homes on the Sabbath. That effectively means that many families cannot go out together from sunset Friday to sunset Saturday each week. For some Orthodox Jews in the Northeast, the modern solution is an eruv, a symbolic extension of the walls of their domains. They plan to accomplish this extension by attaching an inconspicuous but sturdy black string to utility and light poles surrounding their neighborhoods, including all or parts of Oxford Circle, Lawndale, Rhawnhurst and Fox Chase.
NEWS
March 3, 1990 | By Carol Morello, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is Friday night in the Holy City, the beginning of the Sabbath. The streets are deserted, the cafes are empty, the buses have all stopped running. But for Ronan Ohana, the night is young and made for boogieing. "I come here to forget everything," said the 19-year-old soldier, who had donned a fashionably slouchy black-and-white checked jacket for the night, as he took a break from dancing in the aisle of a glitzy discotheque in Jerusalem's new nightclub area. "I just want to think about the lights, the music, the girls.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2010 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
A version of this article appeared in the Oct. 17 issue of The Inquirer. For nearly 4,000 years, the phrase has been a bedrock among observant Jews: "Remember the Sabbath day, and keep it holy. " The Fourth Commandment has the power to still storefronts, fill synagogues, and turn the sidewalks of some neighborhoods into a sea of black-garbed Orthodox Jews from sundown Friday to sundown Saturday as they fulfill the obligation to enjoy a day of rest. But ancient practice created a very contemporary predicament for the National Museum of American Jewish History, which will open its new building off Independence Mall on Nov. 26. And dealing with the sanctity of the Sabbath required a Solomonic solution.
NEWS
August 25, 1995 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
On a recent broiling hot summer afternoon, Rabbi Shlomo Caplan, dressed in a black suit, white long-sleeved shirt, gray tie, and with a black fedora pushed back from his forehead, stood in the middle of Wiltshire Road in Wynnewood. Above him, in the bucket of a cherry picker, electrician Jim Hober followed the rabbi's shouted instructions as he pulled a black nylon line through the branches of a tree. "That's good," he said. "Pull it up a bit. . . . Perfect! Good!" Arnold Koffler, coolly attired in sandals and a pair of shorts, strolled out of his house and watched for a few minutes before approaching the man in black.
NEWS
October 25, 1997 | By Rev. Donna Schaper
Whatever happened to Sabbath? It used to mean Sunday for Christians and Saturday for Jews. It was the day taken off from work for religion - and for the rest that religion brought to people who took regular Sabbaths. It was not television and its dramatic replacement of our story with someone else's story. It was not "blitzing out. " It was not hiking, with its grand viewpoints and heavy breathing and body-changing, feel-good potential. Nor was Sabbath time to do errands or get caught up on our desk stress or pay our bills or visit our relatives.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2011
Perhaps the stickiest issue of all surrounding the opening of the National Museum of American Jewish History last November was whether it would be open on Saturdays. On the one hand, Saturday is potentially the best-attended day of the week for any such institution. But on the other hand, it is also the Sabbath day for observant Jews; operating Saturday could be perceived as a sign of disrespect. But in Solomon-like fashion, a compromise was conjured: The museum is open Saturday, but because Jewish law prohibits cash transactions on Sabbath, tickets must either be purchased in advance, or with credit cards at the museum (the transactions are posted electronically the next day)
NEWS
October 17, 2010 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
For nearly 4,000 years, the phrase has been a bedrock among observant Jews: "Remember the Sabbath day, and keep it holy. " The Fourth Commandment has the power to still storefronts, fill synagogues, and turn the sidewalks of some neighborhoods into a sea of black-cloaked Orthodox Jews from sundown Friday to sundown Saturday as they fulfill the obligation to enjoy a day of rest. But ancient practice created a very contemporary predicament for the National Museum of American Jewish History, which will open its new building off Independence Mall on Nov. 26. And dealing with the sanctity of the Sabbath required a Solomonic solution.
NEWS
August 14, 2000
The cartoon on the Aug. 11 Commentary Page was drawn by Paul Lachine. Statements made in an article by Alan Caruba on that page require clarification about the religious practice of Orthodox Jews. The skullcap is traditionally worn at all times, but some Orthodox Jews wear it only for prayer. The Torah is read on Mondays, Thursdays, on the Sabbath and on holy days. Divorce and remarriage, while not encouraged, are allowed. Traditional Orthodox teaching stresses that human conception and gestation are of divine origin and are not to be interfered with.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
October 27, 2014 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
For as long as she can remember, Susan Stapler Davis has loved fabric. Actually, it's in her DNA. When you come of age in the Stapler family, longtime owners of Stapler Fabric at 1222 Walnut St. until it closed in 2007, that sort of predilection is predictable. "I loved the store, and I loved being there. I spent most of my adult years working there in sales and design after the kids were grown," Davis fondly recalls in her cooperative apartment on JFK Boulevard, where lush fabrics are everywhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2014 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
I've been greeting the mailman as if he were Brad Pitt these days. I practically attack him, and by now he knows why. Three of our seven grandchildren - Carly, Danny, and Emily - are away at summer camp. While they have faithfully promised to write, the grand total so far, nearly halfway in, is one letter from one granddaughter. Eleven-year-old Emily, suddenly tall and graceful and the wordsmith among our grandchildren, has sent a full description of life up there in the Poconos.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
The legend of the first edition of Black Sabbath - heavy metal's loudest, sludgiest, darkest band - looms large; large enough to survive Ozzy Osbourne's leaving after Never Say Die! in 1978; large enough, even, to survive the demonic singer's family-friendly time as a reality television staple. Since the band's 1969 start, guitarist Tony Iommi's arsenal of thick, monster riffs and archly sinister solos, along with bassist Geezer Butler's nimble-fingered low-end rumble (to say nothing of his meanly fantastical lyrics)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2012 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Ever since 2006's Age of Winters , the Sword and its lyricist/guitarist/singer J.D. Cronise have combined fantastical tale-telling and complex heavy metal in a way that would make H.P. Lovecraft and Tony Iommi stand up and take notice. From Cronise's Ozzy-like vocal esprit to co-guitarist Kyle Shutt's raging pyrotechnics, the Sword's overall sonic demeanor has been gloriously Black Sabbath-esque since Day 1. "I think a lot of our fans see us as sort of picking up where Sabbath and Zeppelin left off," Cronise said from the band's home base of Austin, Texas.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2011
Perhaps the stickiest issue of all surrounding the opening of the National Museum of American Jewish History last November was whether it would be open on Saturdays. On the one hand, Saturday is potentially the best-attended day of the week for any such institution. But on the other hand, it is also the Sabbath day for observant Jews; operating Saturday could be perceived as a sign of disrespect. But in Solomon-like fashion, a compromise was conjured: The museum is open Saturday, but because Jewish law prohibits cash transactions on Sabbath, tickets must either be purchased in advance, or with credit cards at the museum (the transactions are posted electronically the next day)
NEWS
November 17, 2010
Freedom of choice has its limits In her remarks at the Plumstead Christian School, Sarah Palin declared her support for "freedom of choice" by stating, "Who should be making the decisions, what [children] eat in school" ("Cookie charge half-baked," Saturday). She was arguing for freedom of choice for those who wish to eat cookies and other sweets in public schools rather than having a state-imposed standard. Does her support for "freedom of choice" apply equally to women's rights?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2010 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
A version of this article appeared in the Oct. 17 issue of The Inquirer. For nearly 4,000 years, the phrase has been a bedrock among observant Jews: "Remember the Sabbath day, and keep it holy. " The Fourth Commandment has the power to still storefronts, fill synagogues, and turn the sidewalks of some neighborhoods into a sea of black-garbed Orthodox Jews from sundown Friday to sundown Saturday as they fulfill the obligation to enjoy a day of rest. But ancient practice created a very contemporary predicament for the National Museum of American Jewish History, which will open its new building off Independence Mall on Nov. 26. And dealing with the sanctity of the Sabbath required a Solomonic solution.
NEWS
October 17, 2010 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Staff Writer
For nearly 4,000 years, the phrase has been a bedrock among observant Jews: "Remember the Sabbath day, and keep it holy. " The Fourth Commandment has the power to still storefronts, fill synagogues, and turn the sidewalks of some neighborhoods into a sea of black-cloaked Orthodox Jews from sundown Friday to sundown Saturday as they fulfill the obligation to enjoy a day of rest. But ancient practice created a very contemporary predicament for the National Museum of American Jewish History, which will open its new building off Independence Mall on Nov. 26. And dealing with the sanctity of the Sabbath required a Solomonic solution.
NEWS
December 20, 2009 | By Melissa Gittelman FOR THE INQUIRER
On Friday evenings in Jerusalem, after the sun lies down to rest, the Jewish people close their shops and restaurants in preparation for Shabbat. From sundown Friday to sundown Saturday, technology and labor cease, and rest and religion commence. I was brought up in a very secular household, and tradition and rituals like this never played an important role in my life. So when Friday evening arrived on my first visit to Jerusalem, I'd forgotten how sacred the Sabbath is to religious Jews.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2009 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
Not that you would call him svelte. By any means. But I ask Mitch Lipkin, 60 now, hasn't he lost some weight? "I lose some. I find some," he shrugs. He is leaning over the counter at Lipkin's Bakery (est. 1975, "before the Bicentennial"), at Castor and Rhawn, which is to say the deep Northeast, the streetscape tending to workaday two-story storefronts, or lower. A Pizza Hut sign looms at the corner, hogging the view. Such as it is. It has been 14 years now since I talked to him at any length.
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