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Sacred Heart Hospital

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NEWS
July 4, 1997 | By Scott Cech, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
County officials and contractors are at a loss to explain how 375 feet of copper pipe disappeared, apparently in broad daylight, from the former Sacred Heart Hospital, which the county is renovating for offices. The project's construction management consultant estimated the loss, reported to borough police last week, at $6,200, including installation costs. David Gill, project manager for Philadelphia-based general contractor Ernest Bock & Sons, said no security workers are on duty at the building during the 7 a.m.-to-3:30 p.m. workday.
NEWS
May 7, 1996 | By Rena Singer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Montgomery County's on-again, off-again relationship with private physicians interested in renting a chunk of the mothballed Sacred Heart Hospital is on again. John Sgarlata, assistant chief operating officer for the county, said the county commissioners had been in contact with a number of physicians envisioning a clinic-emergency room at the 294,000-square-foot facility, which the county bought in 1994. Sgarlata would not say who those physicians were or the kind of medicine they practiced.
NEWS
November 20, 1994 | By Jere Downs, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Because Montgomery County already has a surplus of private nursing home beds, state Department of Health regulations may put a damper on the county's proposed conversion of the former Sacred Heart Hospital into a government-run nursing home for the poor. By state standards, there is a surplus of 1,400 private nursing home beds in the county, said Carol Cochran, deputy secretary at the state Department of Health. As a result, she said, county officials may find it difficult to obtain the required certificate of need to open a second county nursing home.
NEWS
May 19, 1994 | By Jere Downs and Kristin E. Holmes, FOR THE INQUIRER
By 3:45 p.m. yesterday, the last patient was gone. Otherwise, Sacred Heart Hospital looked as it always did. Employees in surgical whites lingered outside the emergency room. Traffic buzzed past on Norristown's DeKalb Street under cloudy skies. But near the landscaped entrance, a white-haired man loaded some books into his station wagon. "I came back to say goodbye," said Robert Byrne, gazing up at the brick building where he was once chief of orthopedic surgery. "I still don't understand how it happened.
NEWS
December 14, 1995 | By Rena Singer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Normally a check for $639,000 brings smiles to people's faces. Not yesterday. The Montgomery County Commissioners had expected to raise as much as $1 million from a sealed-bid sale of stethoscopes, X-ray machines, bed linens and assorted other items from the old Sacred Heart Hospital, which the county bought in 1994. Yesterday, they accepted the high bid, which turned out to be $710,000, including the $639,000 check. "We did this in as competitive a method as we could," said County Commissioner Joseph M. Hoeffel 3d, expressing disappointment.
NEWS
February 25, 2000 | By Robert Sanchez, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Montgomery County will file a lawsuit against the architects who helped revamp a Norristown hospital to be used as a county geriatric facility, the county's solicitor said yesterday. Solicitor Steven O'Neill said the county was filing the suit against Horsham Township-based architect The Kwait Organization because of delays and cost overruns in the remodeling of Sacred Heart Hospital. He declined to say what the suit would ask for, but said it should be filed within 30 days. Commissioners Chairman Michael Marino said the county had expected to pay $30 million to buy and renovate the Sacred Heart building, but now it appeared that an additional $10 million might be needed to complete the project.
NEWS
May 18, 1994 | By Jere Downs, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The financially troubled Sacred Heart Hospital in Norristown abruptly announced last night that it will shut down today, transferring 97 patients and laying off 870 full- and part-time employees. Hospital president J. Russell Walsh made the announcement shortly after 9 p.m., following a vote to close by the board of directors. "Despite aggressive cost-saving measures and months of extensive review of operating alternatives," Walsh said, "resources will not be available to sustain the services necessary to guarantee quality care for our patients, and we must take the necessary steps to not place them in jeopardy.
NEWS
November 21, 1995 | By Michelle Conlin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For more than a year, the sprawling stone building has sat empty, a mausoleum to medicine. But after enduring a stunning, overnight closure in May 1994 and a rancorous bidding war in U.S. Bankruptcy Court the following September, the former Sacred Heart Hospital is set to get its first push toward becoming the county's new one-stop-shopping human services center. The county received nearly 200 bids yesterday as part of an auction to sell off the hospital's contents, ranging from X-ray equipment to bedpans to the marble altar in the chapel.
NEWS
June 4, 1994 | By Jere Downs, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Montgomery Hospital in Norristown has made an offer to buy its shuttered neighbor, Sacred Heart Hospital, with plans to open a long-term injury- rehabilitation center, Sacred Heart attorney Vincent Marriott said yesterday. Montgomery officials would not discuss details of the offer yesterday. Sacred Heart's board of directors discussed the offer Thursday night. The Sacred Heart board shut the 270-bed hospital down with little warning May 18, days after it defaulted on a $26 million bond.
NEWS
June 10, 1993 | For The Inquirer / ROGER TUNIS
Medieval storyteller Lady Denise - also known as Norristown-Montgomery County librarian Denise Pulgino - entertains youngsters and adults at Norristown's Family Celebration, the borough's annual street fair, held Saturday. Musicians, jugglers and puppeteers also provided entertainment. Art works were on sale, and Sacred Heart Hospital provided free health screenings.
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NEWS
April 12, 2013 | By Rachel Weiner, Washington Post
A Kentucky Democrat said Thursday that two activists connected to a local political group were responsible for recording a private conversation between Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R., Ky.) and his senior campaign staff. The recording was disclosed earlier this week by Mother Jones magazine, prompting McConnell to request an FBI investigation and accuse liberals of bugging his office. On the tape, McConnell's campaign staffers discuss using comments made by actress Ashley Judd about her faith and her mental health against her in a possible Senate run. Judd has since decided not to run for Senate.
NEWS
July 13, 2010 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
William P. Rumsey, 93, of Wallingford, chief of surgery at Sacred Heart Hospital in Chester in the 1970s, died Friday, July 9, at Crozer-Chester Medical Center. Born in Swarthmore, Dr. Rumsey graduated from Swarthmore High School in 1935, earned a premed bachelor's degree at Pennsylvania State University in 1939, and graduated from Temple University School of Medicine in 1943. A daughter, Joanne Jenkins, said that for much of the remainder of World War II, Dr. Rumsey was an Army surgeon at a military hospital outside London.
NEWS
June 13, 2009 | By Derrick Nunnally INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The last 60 people living in Pennsylvania's only county-operated assisted-living home will be forced out this summer when Montgomery County shuts down the facility. They will instead live in private assisted-living centers, at taxpayer expense, for the rest of their lives, as the county attempts to shave its budget by privatizing its experiment as an assisted-living provider. Although Montgomery County spent $750,000 a decade ago to renovate Norristown's former Sacred Heart Hospital as an assisted-living center, officials decided they can no longer afford to spend $2 million a year running the place.
NEWS
January 3, 2009 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Rev. Joseph E. Walsh, 87, pastor emeritus of St. Francis de Sales Church in Lenni, Delaware County, died of congestive heart failure Monday at St. Francis Country House in Darby. Father Walsh was pastor of St. Francis from 1974 until he was given emeritus status in 1990. A Philadelphia native, Father Walsh graduated from St. Joseph's Preparatory School and St. Charles Borromeo Seminary, and was ordained in 1947 at the Cathedral Basilica of SS. Peter and Paul. Archdiocesan spokesman Kevin Mulligan said Father Walsh's other parish assignments were: St. Paul's, Philadelphia, June 1947 to May 1952; Old St. Mary's, Philadelphia, May 1952 to March 1953; St. Catherine of Siena, Reading, September 1954 to June 1955; St. Francis of Assisi, Norristown, June 1955 to September 1956; St. Frances Cabrini, Fairless Hills, September 1956 to May 1960; Holy Martyrs, Oreland, May 1960 to June 1963; St. Dominic's, Philadelphia, June 1963 to June 1968; and St. David's, Willow Grove, June 1968 to June 1974.
NEWS
September 15, 2007
ALLENTOWN - A Lincoln University student celebrating a friend's birthday at a nightclub was shot to death early yesterday in the parking lot. City police responding to a fight at the Bananas Nightclub at 1:30 a.m. found several vehicles with bullet holes, but no victims. Soon after, police received a report that two males with gunshot wounds had arrived at nearby Sacred Heart Hospital. One was the student, Michael A. Douglas, 19, who died within minutes. Douglas, of Easton, was with about a half-dozen friends celebrating a friend's birthday, according to friends and family.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2005 | By Howard Gensler gensleh@phillynews.com Daily News wire services contributed to this report
IF YOU'RE like Tattle, obsessing over the comings and goings of movie stars, rappers and pop tarts in between watching screener tapes for the Philadelphia Film Festival, you were probably thrown for a bit of a loop when Britney Spears' Web site pregnancy announcement mentioned a recent hospital visit. Fortunately, the Star has a team of reporters and photographers poised in and around Britney's birth canal, so here's the latest: Star reports she's almost 4 months pregnant and while she was on a Florida vacation with her layabout husband (since their marriage, has there been a day when they've not been on vacation?
NEWS
June 7, 2003 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nino de Prophetis Sr., 88, a retired thoracic surgeon and chief of surgery who earned a Bronze Star for rescuing a fellow medical corpsman during World War II, died of heart failure Tuesday at Fair Acres in Lima. Dr. de Prophetis was serving in Austria when he ventured out alone to save a serviceman who had been captured by the German army. He yelled out military orders pretending to be a corps of soldiers and not a lone Army physician. Dr. de Prophetis fooled the enemy soldiers, who then retreated, freeing the medical corpsman.
NEWS
October 31, 2000 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Stella H. "Jerry" Dunlap, who could work at being a wife, mother and homemaker with enough child's play mixed in so that everyone wanted to be in the game, too, died Wednesday of a heart attack. She was 84 and lived in Chester. Jerry Dunlap had found and opened the tiny, secret door to a happy life while still very young and though eight decades would pass, she never let it close behind her. She didn't have to seek out a holy man in the Himalayas to unlock the mystery of life.
NEWS
February 25, 2000 | By Robert Sanchez, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Montgomery County will file a lawsuit against the architects who helped revamp a Norristown hospital to be used as a county geriatric facility, the county's solicitor said yesterday. Solicitor Steven O'Neill said the county was filing the suit against Horsham Township-based architect The Kwait Organization because of delays and cost overruns in the remodeling of Sacred Heart Hospital. He declined to say what the suit would ask for, but said it should be filed within 30 days. Commissioners Chairman Michael Marino said the county had expected to pay $30 million to buy and renovate the Sacred Heart building, but now it appeared that an additional $10 million might be needed to complete the project.
NEWS
February 18, 2000 | By Jason Wermers, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Zoning Hearing Board dealt another setback Wednesday night to a proposed substance-abuse treatment center, much to the delight of the more than 60 residents attending the meeting. After listening to more than two hours of testimony from borough residents and officials of Diversified Health Associates, the board unanimously upheld the Planning Commission's December ruling that the facility is an "institutional home," not a "hospital. " Because of the ruling, Diversified would need to obtain a variance to operate the treatment center in Norristown's health-care district, which runs along DeKalb Street near the former Sacred Heart Hospital, and along Fornance Street around Montgomery Hospital.
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