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Sacred Places

NEWS
August 26, 1998 | By Mark Alan Hughes and Anais Loizillon
Our region's oldest religious buildings represent an enduring connection between people divided into suburb and city, white and black, rich and poor. After two generations of suburbanization and population loss, many congregations in the city have dissolved or moved to the suburban counties. Yet the buildings endure in older neighborhoods like North Philadelphia. And, in many cases, new congregations with different denominations inherit the historic properties of earlier residents.
NEWS
December 3, 2000 | By Victoria Donohoe, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Sacred art is his forte. Yet Bolton Morris is probably the best 20th-century artist in our region to have had hardly any career as an exhibitor, apart from respectful attention to individual works he was commissioned to make for sacred places. Now that this versatile artist is 80, Villanova University Art Gallery has filled the exhibition gap with a large retrospective show of Morris' work. From beginning to end, this 91-item display is more than a document of one artist's prolific underground career.
NEWS
August 15, 1987 | By Donella H. Meadows
Badly typed, single-spaced, a copy of a copy of a copy. More flaky New Age stuff. It's amazing how much of it floats into my life. "On Aug. 16, 1987, a galactic beam surrounding Earth will phase acceleration to synchronization. There will be a break in the harmonic resonance of the electromagnetic field of Earth. Many enlightened beings are due to return around that time, among them the Lord of Unified Opposites, Quetzalcoatl. " I don't know why I read nonsense like this, but I do, I usually do, with a sort of incredulous fascination.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1992 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The landscapes that Linda Connor explores in her gold-toned, black-and- white photographs are spiritual and metaphorical rather than topographical, even though many of the prints in the exhibition of her work at Haverford College's Comfort Gallery resemble conventional landscapes. To find her pictures, Connor, who lives in California, has visited outposts, often remote, that are steeped in a palpably spiritual ambience - Katmandu in Nepal, the Indian holy city of Benares and the former Inca religious center of Macchu Pichu, perched on an Andean mountaintop.
NEWS
January 30, 1994 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Time was, raising money from a wealthy Rittenhouse Square congregation was a relatively painless task. The minister would stand in front of his parish and explain that the church needed, say, a new roof or repairs to a stained- glass window, and the money would pour in. But times have changed. As much of the city's wealth moved out to the suburbs, and as big-city problems began to cry out for attention, the churches of Philadelphia's wealthiest neighborhoods found themselves spread thin.
NEWS
April 7, 2014 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
ANOTHER YEAR, and the feisty members of Fishtown's St. Laurentius Catholic Church are going toe-to-toe again with their oft-nemesis, the Philadelphia Archdiocese. First came word in 2012 that the archdiocese would shutter the parish school, even though its enrollment was increasing. A fight ensued, led by passionate well-organized parish families, and St. Laurentius prevailed (the school is doing well, by the way.) Then the archdiocese announced in 2013 that St. Laurentius would merge its parish operations into Holy Name Church, a few blocks away.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
The University of Pennsylvania's Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, founded in 1887, amassed many of its treasures during the so-called golden age of museum collecting - an era well known for unprecedented institution-building, less so for cultural sensitivity. (The decades since have brought negotiations and lawsuits over the repatriation of artifacts to various tribes and nations.) That backdrop provides a striking contrast with the museum's newest exhibition, Native American Voices: The People - Here and Now , which opens Saturday.
NEWS
February 1, 2011 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
What is the dollar value of a marriage saved? A suicide averted? An addiction conquered? A teenager taught right from wrong? In short: What is a church's economic worth to the community it serves? Last summer, a University of Pennsylvania professor and a national secular research group based in Center City took up that seemingly unanswerable question. With a list they devised of 54 value categories, they attempted to calculate the economic "halo effect" of a dozen religious congregations in Philadelphia - 10 Protestant churches, a Catholic parish, and a synagogue.
NEWS
April 7, 2001 | By Jim Remsen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As President Bush's point man for faith-based initiatives, John J. DiIulio Jr. is trying to convert a vision of government-religion synergy into bricks-and-mortar reality. Critics have been quick to shoot holes in the vision, but the bricks and mortar often have their own holes. Literal, gaping holes. And sagging old walls, and leaky roofs. That is the plight of thousands of the inner-city congregations that are on the front lines of Bush's "community-serving" agenda. Many are in dilapidated buildings that hamper their ability to provide or increase social ministries.
NEWS
March 6, 2005 | By Gene D'Alessandro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For photographer Tom Crane, it's all about the light. Manipulating it in his work space. Controlling it within his spectacular studio/barn. Even toying with it in his playfully unorthodox home. "My whole being - my mode of operation - is determined by light," said Crane, relaxing at his spacious Bryn Mawr residence on Cumberland Hill. Crane takes pictures for a living. Specifically, he's an architectural photographer, artfully capturing images of buildings and their interiors on film.
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